Support and Establish Community Coalitions

Recommendation 5: Federal, state, and local governments should support the creation and maintenance of broad-based community resilience coalitions at local and regional levels.

*Note that for the purpose of the afternoon workshop, the committee’s scorecard recommendation was split into two different breakout sessions: one that addressed scorecard development and one that addressed scorecard implementation.

Approximately 60 attendees were invited to participate in the afternoon breakout sessions based on their expertise, experience, and perspectives. Each participant was placed in a group that rotated through three of the four topics (see Appendix A for afternoon workshop agenda), and each of the topic areas was moderated and recorded by National Research Council staff members. At the conclusion of the afternoon breakout sessions, a plenary session with all participants was held. Staff members reported back to the entire group on the main points from the breakout discussions on the four topics. This chapter summarizes discussions from the breakout and plenary sessions.

NATIONAL RESILIENCE SCORECARD

 

The committee’s report called for the need to develop indicators to measure progress toward increasing resilience in communities and for such a basis of measurement to be initiated at a national level through a mechanism called a “national resilience scorecard.” The committee envisioned that such a scorecard would identify areas that merit priority, provide a baseline from which to measure change, and offer a systematic approach for measuring progress in building resilient communities (National Academies, 2012). The report recommendation identified the process of developing a scorecard as one that would involve engagement by all levels of government (federal, state, local), the private sector, and community groups and individuals. In addressing a national resilience scorecard, the afternoon workshop held two separate discussion breakout groups: one that focused on issues for developing a scorecard, and another that focused on issues for implementing a scorecard (see also Box 3-1).



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