Appendix D

List of Questions for Afternoon Breakout Sessions

National Resilience Scorecard Development

(1)   Scorecard content and structure

•   What broad categories of information are important to include in a scorecard (e.g. health, infrastructure, emergency management structure, socioeconomic context, building codes)?

•   How would we measure these? Are there specific indicators for each of these and which ones are most important?

•   Which data are/are not available at the community level to measure these specific indicators?

•   How should these indicators and data be incorporated in one scorecard (quantitative, qualitative, some combination of these) to maximize use and effect?

 

(2)   Scorecard application and process (group learning and goal setting)

•   Are there any measurement “best practices” or operating principles that communities should use when setting goals and evaluating progress over time?

•   How can the federal and community coalition roles in scorecard development be linked for best result?

 

(3)   Ensure scorecard development in the short and long term

•   What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 1-2 years to move the scorecard forward?

•   What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 3-5 years to move the scorecard forward?



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Appendix D List of Questions for Afternoon Breakout Sessions National Resilience Scorecard Development (1) Scorecard content and structure  What broad categories of information are important to include in a scorecard (e.g. health, infrastructure, emergency management structure, socioeconomic context, building codes)?  How would we measure these? Are there specific indicators for each of these and which ones are most important?  Which data are/are not available at the community level to measure these specific indicators?  How should these indicators and data be incorporated in one scorecard (quantitative, qualitative, some combination of these) to maximize use and effect? (2) Scorecard application and process (group learning and goal setting)  Are there any measurement “best practices” or operating principles that communities should use when setting goals and evaluating progress over time?  How can the federal and community coalition roles in scorecard development be linked for best result? (3) Ensure scorecard development in the short and long term  What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 1-2 years to move the scorecard forward?  What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 3-5 years to move the scorecard forward? 55

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56 Launching a National Conversation on Disaster Resilience in America: Workshop Summary National Resilience Scorecard Implementation (1) Scorecard engagement—involving communities  How can federal agencies successfully engage with communities, including the private sector, to develop a general scorecard framework and who should be engaged at the non-federal level? What are the challenges to this kind of engagement?  Once a national scorecard framework is established (or while it is being established), what mechanisms can be used by local leaders to engage their communities in tailoring the scorecard to their specific circumstances?  How will community scorecards help the federal government to tailor their approaches and policies to increase national resilience? (2) Ensure scorecard implementation in the short and long term  What incentives can be used by local leaders to encourage citizens, neighborhoods, communities to employ the scorecard and become engaged in building their own resilience?  How can the federal and community coalition roles be linked for best result in scorecard development and implementation?  What support will local communities require from state and federal levels in order to be able to use the scorecards effectively?  What types of guidance should accompany the scorecard to support its adoption and application by local and regional communities?  What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 1-2 years to move the scorecard forward?  What are two steps that we can take (at federal, state, or local levels, including the private sector) in the next 3-5 years to move the scorecard forward? Risk Management (1) What knowledge base is required for developing risk management strategies to make communities and the nation more resilient with respect to natural disasters? (2) What roles should the private sector and the public sector (federal, state, local government and communities) play in the development of these risk management strategies? (3) In developing risk management strategies, how does one incorporate behavioral factors that impact on the decision-making process?

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APPENDIX D 57 Two questions that could be posed to the breakout groups that they will want to address at the end of the session are: (1) What actions should be taken in the next year or two in developing risk management options? (2) What are viable long-term risk management strategies that have a good chance of being implemented over the next 5-10 years? Community Coalitions (1) Weave the full fabric of the community into the coalition  Who are the critical partners in establishing community coalitions at the local level? Who should be included as members of a coalition?  What concrete incentives can be established to entice the private sector, CBOs and FBOs, and representatives of vulnerable populations to join the coalition?  What are some examples of community partnerships that have successfully brought all the key stakeholders to the table? How can their experience be replicated? (2) Develop organizational capacity and leadership to sustain the collaboration  What short-term, low-cost actions can be taken to foster development and maintenance of community coalitions?  What roles can federal and state governments play to help nurture and sustain community coalitions?  How could a block-by-block approach to resilience (including planning, response, and recovery) be incorporated by communities to establish and maintain coalitions? (3) Ensure the coalition’s short- and long-term commitment to planning and risk management  How could the coalition best ensure that resilience to disasters is integrated into the community’s other strategic objectives?  What role could a National Resilience Scorecard (or other measurement tool) play in supporting community resilience planning?