Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of NAS Planning Committee Members

Raymond Jeanloz—University of California, Berkeley (Chair)

Raymond Jeanloz is a Professor of Earth and Planetary Science and of Astronomy at the University of California at Berkeley. He has done pioneering work in mineral physics, measurement of materials properties and simulation of deep-Earth processes using diamond-anvil and shock-wave experiments, elucidation of the core-mantle boundary as a chemically reactive zone, and study of the role of water in mantle processes and deep earthquake generation. His research and teaching have been recognized through a MacArthur Award, the American Geophysical Union’s Macelwane Award, and Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He previously served as chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He is currently the chair of the National Academy of Sciences’ (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control in the Policy and Global Affairs Division, and was elected as a member of the NAS in 2004.

Stephen P. Cohen—The Brookings Institution

Stephen Philip Cohen has been Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution since 1998. In 2004 he was named as one of the five hundred most influential people in the field of foreign policy by the World Affairs Councils of America. Professor Cohen was a faculty member at the University of Illinois from 1965 to 1998. From 1992-93 he was Scholar-in-Residence at the Ford Foundation, New Delhi, and from 1985-1987, a member of the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State, where he dealt with South Asia. He has taught at Andhra University (India) and Keio University (Tokyo), Georgetown University, and now teaches in the South Asian program of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of NAS Planning Committee Members Raymond Jeanloz—University of California, Berkeley (Chair) Raymond Jeanloz is a Professor of Earth and Planetary Science and of Astrono- my at the University of California at Berkeley. He has done pioneering work in mineral physics, measurement of materials properties and simulation of deep- Earth processes using diamond-anvil and shock-wave experiments, elucidation of the core-mantle boundary as a chemically reactive zone, and study of the role of water in mantle processes and deep earthquake generation. His research and teaching have been recognized through a MacArthur Award, the American Geo- physical Union’s Macelwane Award, and Fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence. He previously served as chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He is currently the chair of the National Academy of Sciences’ (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control in the Policy and Global Affairs Division, and was elected as a member of the NAS in 2004. Stephen P. Cohen—The Brookings Institution Stephen Philip Cohen has been Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution since 1998. In 2004 he was named as one of the five hun- dred most influential people in the field of foreign policy by the World Affairs Councils of America. Professor Cohen was a faculty member at the University of Illinois from 1965 to 1998. From 1992-93 he was Scholar-in-Residence at the Ford Foundation, New Delhi, and from 1985-1987, a member of the Policy Planning Staff of the U.S. Department of State, where he dealt with South Asia. He has taught at Andhra University (India) and Keio University (Tokyo), Georgetown University, and now teaches in the South Asian program of Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. 167

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168 India-U.S. Cooperation on Technical Aspects of Civilian Nuclear Materials Security Dr. Cohen has served on numerous study groups examining Asia sponsored by the Asia Society, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Asia Foundation, and the National Bureau of Asian Research; he is currently a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control and a trustee of the Public Education Center. Dr. Cohen was the co-founder and chair of the workshop on Security, Technology and Arms Control for younger South Asian and Chinese strategists, held for the past ten years in Pakistan, In- dia, Sri Lanka and China, and was a founding member of the Research Commit- tee of the South Asian strategic organization, the Regional Centre for Security Studies, Colombo. Dr. Cohen has written, co-authored, or edited ten books. Pro- fessor Cohen received B.A. and M.A. degrees in Political Science from the Uni- versity of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Wis- consin, He has conducted research in China, Britain, India, Pakistan, the former Soviet Union, and Japan. He received grants from several major foundations and serves as a consultant to numerous government agencies. Cherry Murray—Harvard University Cherry A. Murray is Dean of Harvard University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences; and Professor of Physics. Previously, Murray served as principal associate director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and was president of the American Physical Society. Be- fore joining Lawrence Livermore in 2004, Murray was Senior Vice President of Physical Sciences and Wireless Research and had a long and distinguished ca- reer at Bell Laboratories Research. Murray was elected to the National Acade- my of Sciences in 1999, to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and to the National Academy of Engineering in 2002. She has served on more than 80 national and international scientific advisory committees, govern- ing boards and National Research Council panels and as a member of the Na- tional Commission on the British Petroleum Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. She is currently chair of the National Research Council Divi- sion of Engineering and Physical Science. As an experimentalist, Murray is known for her scientific accomplishments in condensed matter and surface phys- ics. She received her B.S. in 1973 and her Ph.D. in physics in 1978 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has published more than 70 papers in peer-reviewed journals and holds two patents in near-field optical data storage and optical display technology. William H. Press—University of Texas, Austin William H. Press is a computer scientist and computational biologist with broad interests in the physical and biological sciences. An experienced manager in both university and national laboratory settings, he is widely recognized for his academic and research accomplishments. Press holds the Warren J. and Viola M. Raymer Chair in Computer Sciences and Integrative Biology at the Universi-

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Appendix D 169 ty of Texas at Austin (UT). At UT, his affiliations include membership in the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences and in the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology. Press is also a Senior Fellow (on leave) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In his research career, Press has published more than 150 papers in areas of computational biology, theoretical astrophys- ics, cosmology, and computational algorithms. He is senior author of the Nu- merical Recipes textbooks on scientific computing, with more than 350,000 hardcover copies in print. His current research is in bioinformatics and whole- genome genetics. At the time of his arrival at Harvard in 1976, Press was its youngest tenured professor. Earlier, he was Assistant Professor of Physics at Princeton University, and Richard Chace Tolman Research Fellow in Theoreti- cal Physics at Caltech, where he received his Ph.D. in physics in 1972. His un- dergraduate degree was from Harvard in 1969. Elected to the NAS in 1994, he in 2000 became a founding member of NAS’s new Computer and Information Sciences section.

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