APPENDIX
Workshop Agenda and Participants



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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop APPENDIX Workshop Agenda and Participants

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop WORKSHOP ON EFFECTIVE SERVICES FOR YOUNG CHILDREN November 1-2, 1990 FIRST DAY, NOVEMBER 1 10:00-10:10 WELCOME-Julius Richmond, Chair National Forum on the Future of Children and Families 10:10-Noon Session I: Attributes of Effective Services   Chair: Mary Jo Bane, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University   Objective: To examine the level of consensus among researchers, policy analysts, and practitioners regarding the common attributes of successful programs for high-risk children and their families and to achieve some agreement among participants around the most crucial, common attributes.   Paper: Lisbeth B. Schorr, Harvard University   Discussants: Rosalie Street, Friends of the Family, Incorporated; Sister Mary Paul Janchill, Center for Family Life in Sunset Park; Robert Granger, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation Noon-1:00 LUNCH 1:00-2:45 Session II: Lessons from Earlier Efforts   Chair: Lisle Carter, United Way of America   Objective: To review and extract lessons from major federal and state efforts of the last 25 years, such as the Model Cities Program, community action programs, block grants, etc., which were designed to improve coordination, reduce fragmentation, and ensure greater accessibility to services.

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop   Paper: Peter Edelman, Georgetown University Law School; Beryl Radin, Washington Public Affairs Center, University of Southern California   Discussants: Douglas Besharov, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research; Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities 2:45-3:00 BREAK 3:00-5:15 Session IIIA: Strategies for Implementing Change   Objective: To identify and assess strategies to promote the widespread adoption and implementation of programs incorporating the attributes of successful programs.   All workshop participants will be assigned to participate in one of the following two concurrent sessions:   1. Strategies based on collaboration and coordination (Room 150)   Chair: Janet Levy, Joining Forces   This session will consider collaboration and coordination as strategies to promote the widespread adoption and implementation of effective programs. Topics to be addressed include: the purposes of collaboration, promising processes, major obstacles, strategies for overcoming obstacles, common attributes of successful collaboration, and the extent to which generalizations can be made across communities, states, and systems.   Paper: Olivia Golden, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University   Discussants: Martin Gerry, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Scott Fosler, Committee on Economic Development; Ralph Smith, Philadelphia Children's Network; Tom Langfitt, Pew Charitable Trusts   2. Financing strategies (Room 250)   Chair: Richard Nathan, Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop   This session will consider financing strategies to remove obstacles to—and provide incentives for—the provision of coherent effective services, including public and private efforts to combine funds from multiple existing sources, and efforts to change the way funds flow to local programs.   Paper: Frank Farrow, Center for the Study of Social Policy   Discussants: Drew Altman, Kaiser Family Foundation (Paper); Annette Abrams, Office of Children and Youth, Michigan 5:30-6:30 RECEPTION (Rotunda) 6:30-7:30 DINNER (Members Room) 7:30-9:00 Session IV: Strategies Based on Building Greater Public Understanding of the Crucial Issues   Chair and Introductory Remarks: James Comer, Yale University   This session will consider strategies to build greater public understanding of the crucial issues including: (a) the nature of the problem, (b) the societal stake in investing in promising solution, and (c) the nature of promising solutions.   Discussants: Kati Haycock, Children's Defense Fund Ann Rosewater, Consultant Robert Wehling, The Proctor & Gamble Company SECOND DAY, NOVEMBER 2 9:00-11:15 Session IIIB: Strategies for Action (continued)   All workshop participants will be assigned to participate in one of the following two concurrent sessions:   3. Technical assistance and training strategies (Room 150)   Chair: Barbara Blum, Foundation for Child Development

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop   This session will consider technical assistance strategies to (a) assist managers in acquiring the requisite skills and expertise to manage reformed service programs, (b) provide a variety of agencies and institutions with help in training front-line workers to function effectively in reformed service programs, and (c) ensure that states and communities can obtain the training and technical assistance that would enable them to modify their operations, structures, funding patterns, etc., in ways that would encourage the development and survival of effective programs.   Paper: Doug Nelson, Annie E. Casey Foundation   Discussants: Charles Bruner, Child Family Policy Center Peter Forsythe, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation   4. Strategies based on greater use of outcome measures (Room 250)   Chair: Steve Kelman, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University   This session will consider efforts to shift toward an outcome orientation to assure accountability, improve program performance, and provide the basis for investment of increased resources, allocated on more flexible terms.   Paper: David Hornbeck, Education Adviser, Baltimore, Md.   Discussants: Heather Weiss, Harvard Family Research Project; Sid Gardner, Youth at Risk Project 11:15-11:30 BREAK 11:30-4:00 Session V: Making It Happen—Identifying Strategies for Systematic Change and Action-Lunch will be provided (Lecture Room)   Chair: Harold Richman, Chapin Hall Center for Children, IL

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop   Objective: Drawing on previous workshop discussions, to identify themes around which there seem to be some consensus; to integrate shared information and understanding in order to identify strategies that could result in systematic action to significantly improve services for high-risk children and their families, and to propose the agencies, institutions, or other entities that should be involved and responsible for the next steps. ADJOURN  

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop PARTICIPANTS Julius B. Richmond (Forum Chair), Division of Health Research and Education, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Lisbeth Schorr, (Workshop Chair), School of Medicine, Harvard University, Washington, DC L. Annette Abrams, Office of Children and Youth Services, Lansing, MI Drew Altman, Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, CA Michael Bailin, Public/Private Ventures, Philadelphia, PA Mary Jo Bane, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Rhoda Baruch, Institute for Mental Health Initiatives, Washington, DC Dennis Beatrice, Pew Charitable Trust, Philadelphia, PA Douglas J. Besharov, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC Martin Blank, Institute for Educational Leadership, Washington, DC Barbara Blum, Foundation for Child Development, New York, NY Prudence Brown, Urban Poverty Program, Ford Foundation, New York, NY Charles Bruner, Child and Family Policy Center, Des Moines, IA Michele Cahill, Academy for Educational Development, Inc., New York, NY Lisle Carter, United Way of America, Alexandria, VA James P. Comer, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT Gayle Dorman, Lilly Endowment Foundation, Indianapolis, IN Peter Edelman, Georgetown University Law School, Washington, DC Frank Farrow, Center for the Study of Social Policy, Washington, DC Gilda Ferguson-Smith, Family Focus Lawndale, Chicago, IL Peter Forsythe, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, New York, NY Scott Fosler, Committee on Economic Development, Washington, DC Donald M. Fraser, Mayor, Minneapolis, MN Sid Gardner, Youth at Risk Project, Orange, CA Martin H. Gerry, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC Olivia Golden, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA Robert Granger, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, New York, NY Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC Kati Haycock, Children's Defense Fund, Washington, DC Fred M. Hechinger, New York Times Company Foundation, New York, NY Wade Horn, Administration for Children, Youth and Families, Washington, DC

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Effective Services for Young Children: Report of a Workshop David W. Hornbeck, Education Adviser, Baltimore, MD Sister Mary Paul Janchill, Center for Family Life in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, NY Gloria Johnson-Powell, Camille Cosby Ambulatory Care Center, Boston, MA Judith Jones, National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University, New York, NY Lynn Kagan, Child Development and Social Policy, Yale University Bush Center, New Haven, CT Sheila Kamerman, School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, NY Evelyn Kays-Battle, Reginald Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, Rockville, MD Steven Kelman, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Richard Kinch, Johnson Foundation, Racine, WI Thomas Langfitt, Pew Charitable Trust, Philadelphia, PA Carol Larson, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, CA Michael Levine, Carnegie Corporation of New York, New York, NY Janet E. Levy, Joining Forces, Washington, DC Joan Lipsitz, Lilly Endowment, Inc., Indianapolis, IN Shelby Miller, Ford Foundation, New York, NY Lyn Mortimer, Carnegie Corporation of New York, New York, NY Richard P. Nathan, Rockefeller College, Albany, NY Douglas Nelson, Annie E. Casey Foundation, CT Billie K. Press, Reginald Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, Rockville, MD Beryl Radin, Washington Public Affairs Center, University of Southern California, Washington, DC Harold Richman, Chapin Hall Center for Children, Chicago, IL Gloria G. Rodriquez, AVANCE, San Antonio, TX Ann Rosewater, Consultant, Atlanta, GA Ellen Schall, National Center for Health Education, New York, NY Ann Segal, Division of Children and Youth Policy, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC Ralph R. Smith, Philadelphia Children's Network, Philadelphia, PA Rosalie Street, Friends of the Family, Baltimore, MD Reed Tuckson, March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, NY Robert L. Wehling, Proctor & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Heather Weiss, Harvard Family Research Project, Cambridge, MA Bernice Weissbourd, Family Focus, Evanston, IL Donna Weston, Children Hospital Medical Center, Oakland, CA