Appendix C

Speakers Biographies

MICHAEL BORRUS is the founding general partner of X/Seed Capital, a seed-focused early stage venture fund. Prior to X/Seed, he was Executive in Residence at Mohr Davidow Ventures (MDV). Previously, Borrus was Managing Director of The Petkevich Group (TPG), a start-up merchant bank providing financial advisory services and investment capital to growth companies in life sciences and technology. Before TPG, Michael was Adjunct Professor in University of California, Berkeley’s College of Engineering, Co-founder and Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) at the University of California, Berkeley, and a partner in Industry and Trade Strategies, a business consultancy. He is the author of three books, has appeared in numerous media outlets from CNN and NPR to the New York Times, and serves on the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Government Advanced Technology Program (ATP). Borrus is an honors graduate of Harvard Law School, the University of California, Berkeley and Princeton University. He is a member of the California State Bar.

LEWIS M. BRANSCOMB was the Co-founder of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) at the University of Colorado. He holds appointments as a Research Associate at the Scripps Institution for Oceanography and the University of California, San Diego, the Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management, emeritus, at Harvard University, director emeritus of Harvard’s Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a member of the Center’s Board of Directors. Branscomb pioneered the study of atomic and molecular negative ions and their role in the atmospheres of the earth. After serving as director of the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (now the Institute for Standards and Technology) from 1969–1972, he was named vice president and chief scientist of IBM Corporation and a member of the IBM Corporate Management Board. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed him to the National Science Board and he was elected chairman, serving until May 1984. Branscomb was also appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to the President’s Science Advisory Committee (1964–1968) and by President Ronald Reagan to the National Productivity Advisory Committee. He is a member of the National



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Appendix C Speakers Biographies MICHAEL BORRUS is the founding general partner of X/Seed Capital, a seed-focused early stage venture fund. Prior to X/Seed, he was Executive in Residence at Mohr Davidow Ventures (MDV). Previously, Borrus was Managing Director of The Petkevich Group (TPG), a start-up merchant bank providing financial advisory services and investment capital to growth companies in life sciences and technology. Before TPG, Michael was Adjunct Professor in University of California, Berkeley's College of Engineering, Co- founder and Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) at the University of California, Berkeley, and a partner in Industry and Trade Strategies, a business consultancy. He is the author of three books, has appeared in numerous media outlets from CNN and NPR to the New York Times, and serves on the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Government Advanced Technology Program (ATP). Borrus is an honors graduate of Harvard Law School, the University of California, Berkeley and Princeton University. He is a member of the California State Bar. LEWIS M. BRANSCOMB was the Co-founder of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) at the University of Colorado. He holds appointments as a Research Associate at the Scripps Institution for Oceanography and the University of California, San Diego, the Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management, emeritus, at Harvard University, director emeritus of Harvard's Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and a member of the Center’s Board of Directors. Branscomb pioneered the study of atomic and molecular negative ions and their role in the atmospheres of the earth. After serving as director of the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (now the Institute for Standards and Technology) from 1969–1972, he was named vice president and chief scientist of IBM Corporation and a member of the IBM Corporate Management Board. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed him to the National Science Board and he was elected chairman, serving until May 1984. Branscomb was also appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to the President's Science Advisory Committee (1964–1968) and by President Ronald Reagan to the National Productivity Advisory Committee. He is a member of the National 49

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50 WORKSHOPS ON TRENDS IN THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM Academy of Engineering (NAE), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Academy of Public Administration. He served twice as a director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), member of the NAS Council and of the Governing Board of the National Research Council. He is a former president of the American Physical Society and a former president of Sigma Xi. He is a recipient of the Vannevar Bush Award of the National Science Board, the Arthur Bueche Award of the National Academy of Engineering, the Gold Medal of the U.S. Department of Commerce, and the Okawa Prize in Communications and Informatics. He received the Centennial Medal of the Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 2002. He holds honorary doctoral degrees from sixteen universities and is an honorary associate of the Engineering Academy of Japan and an Associate member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Branscomb received his B.A. in physics, summa cum laude, from Duke University in 1945 and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard in 1949, when he was appointed Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows. YI CUI is an Associate Professor in Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. His current research is focused on nanomaterials for energy storage, photovoltaics, topological insulators, biology and environment. He is the Co-Founder and Director of Amprius, Inc, a start-up that focuses on battery technology developed from his research at Stanford. He has received the Sloan Research Fellowship (2010), the Global Climate and Energy Project Distinguished Lecturer (2009), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (2008), Office of Naval Research (ONR) Young Investigator Award (2008), MDV Innovators Award (2007), Terman Fellowship (2005), the Technology Review World Top Young Innovator Award (2004), Miller Research Fellowship (2003), Distinguished Graduate Student Award in Nanotechnology (Foresight Institute, 2002), Gold Medal of Graduate Student Award (Material Research Society, 2001). Cui received a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Science and Technology of China and his Ph.D. from Harvard University, in semiconductor nanowires. BRIAN DARMODY is Associate Vice President for Research and Economic Development, Director of Corporate Relations, and Special Assistant Vice Chancellor for Technology Development, University System of Maryland. He is responsible for developing linkages with private and government sectors, and developing projects funding opportunities and policies to support these initiatives. In his role with the University System of Maryland, he focuses on improving technology commercialization across the University System of Maryland and issues supporting university-federal lab partnerships. He serves on state and national boards, including Fraunhofer USA, Alliance for Science and

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APPENDIX C: SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES 51 Technology Research America (ASTRA), National Association of Seed and Venture Funds (NASVF), the Maryland Venture Authority. Projects led by Darmody include organizing the University's first technology transfer office, authoring reforms to the State's ethics legislation for entrepreneurial start-ups, developing legislation creating the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO), and serving as Director of the University of Maryland Center for Applied Policy Studies (UMCAPS). He holds a Juris Doctor from the University of Baltimore and an undergraduate degree. from the University of Maryland, College Park. JOHN HARDIN is the Executive Director for the North Carolina Board of Science & Technology, which is staffed by Office of Science & Technology in the North Carolina Department of Commerce. He was appointed Acting Director in spring 2008 and Executive Director in fall 2009. Previously, he served as the Board's Deputy Director and Chief Policy Analyst. The Board advises and makes recommendations to the North Carolina Governor, General Assembly, Secretary of Commerce, and Economic Development Board on the role of science and technology in the economic growth and development of the state. Hardin’s duties include developing and justifying legislation related to defining statewide research capacity and structure; implementing science and technology-related economic development policy and resource allocations; research, analysis, and review of substantive policy issues and proposals; preparing public policy and budget analyses; preparing and presenting high- level state policy briefings, assessments, and reports to policy makers and external constituencies; conducting strategic planning and making recommendations for technology-based economic development; directing and overseeing strategic initiatives with impact at the state level; and overseeing the administration of grant programs to support technology commercialization by North Carolina small businesses. Before serving on the board, he was the Assistant Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs in the University of North Carolina (UNC) General Administration. He currently holds an Adjunct Assistant Professor position in the Department of Public Policy at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he teaches courses on American politics, public policy, and policy analysis. A native of Tulsa, Okla., he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from UNC-Chapel Hill, and a B.A. in economics from Baylor University. JOHN L. HENNESSY joined Stanford’s faculty as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He rose through the academic ranks to full professorship and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. Hennessy was director of the Computer Systems Laboratory, a research and teaching center operated by

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52 WORKSHOPS ON TRENDS IN THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science that fosters research in computer systems design. He served as chair of computer science and dean of the School of Engineering, before he was named provost, where continued his efforts to foster interdisciplinary activities in the biosciences and bioengineering, and oversaw improvements in faculty and staff compensation. In October 2000, he was inaugurated as Stanford University’s 10th president. In 2005, he became the inaugural holder of the Bing Presidential Professorship. Dr. Hennessy is a recipient of the 2000 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) John von Neumann Medal, the 2000 American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, the 2001 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM0 Eckert-Mauchly Award, the 2001 Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, a 2004 NEC C&C Prize for lifetime achievement in computer science and engineering, a 2005 Founders Award from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 2012 IEEE Medal of Honor, IEEE's highest award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has lectured and published widely and is the co-author of two internationally used undergraduate and graduate textbooks on computer architecture design. Dr. Hennessy earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Villanova University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. DAVID A. HODGES is the Daniel M. Tellep Distinguished Professor of Engineering Emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley. He worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill and Holmdel, NJ, before joining the faculty in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) at UC Berkeley. Following a year as Chair of the EECS Department, he served as Dean of the College of Engineering. His teaching and research has centered on microelectronics technology and design, and semiconductor manufacturing systems. With Professor Robert C. Leachman, he founded Berkeley's Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing Program. Hodges was the winner of the 1997 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Education Medal and the 1999 American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Benjamin Garver Lamme Award. He was the founding Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, a past Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, and a past Chairman of the International Solid- State Circuits Conference. With R. W. Brodersen and P. R. Gray, he received the 1983 IEEE Morris N. Liebmann Award for pioneering work on switched- capacitor circuits. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is a former Director of Silicon Image, Inc. and of Mentor Graphics. He earned the B.E.E. degree at Cornell University and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at Berkeley.

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APPENDIX C: SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES 53 JACKIE KERBY MOORE is the executive director of the Sandia Science & Technology Park and has been since its inception in 1998. In her role as executive director, Kerby Moore oversees all aspects of the Park – including the management, marketing, recruiting of tenant companies, and securing of funding for infrastructure improvements. In related activities, she is past president of the Board of Directors for the Association of University Research Parks. During her years leading the Association, she chaired the first-ever Washington, D.C. Summit on Research Parks. She serves on the Advisory Board for Arrowhead Research Park, the Business and Industry Advisory Cabinet for the Vice President of Research and Economic Development at the University of New Mexico, and she is a member of Albuquerque Economic Development, Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce, Association of Commerce & Industry, Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce, New Mexico Economic Forum, and the International Economic Development Council. Kerby Moore has a Bachelors of Business Administration Degree and a Masters of Business Administration Degree from New Mexico Universities. DAVID MOWERY is the William A. and Betty H. Hasler Professor of New Enterprise Development at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Mowery taught at Carnegie-Mellon University, served as the Study Director for the Panel on Technology and Employment of the National Academy of Sciences, and served in the Office of the United States Trade Representative as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow. He has been a member of a number of National Research Council panels, including those on the Competitive Status of the U.S. Civil Aviation Industry, on the Causes and Consequences of the Internationalization of U.S. Manufacturing, on the Federal Role in Civilian Technology Development, on U.S. Strategies for the Children's Vaccine Initiative, and on Applications of Biotechnology to Contraceptive Research and Development. During 2003-2004, he was the Marvin Bower Research Fellow at the Harvard Business School. His research deals with the economics of technological innovation and with the effects of public policies on innovation; he has testified before Congressional committees and served as an adviser for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, various federal agencies and industrial firms. He received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Business School. ED PENHOET is a Director of Alta Partners. He serves on the boards of directors of ChemoCentryx, Immune Design, Metabolex, Scynexis, and

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54 WORKSHOPS ON TRENDS IN THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM ZymoGenetics. A co-founder of Chiron, Penhoet served as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer from its formation in 1981 until April 1998. He is a member of the Independent Citizens Oversight Committee for the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), and recently served as the as President of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. For 10 years prior to founding Chiron, Penhoet was a faculty member of the Biochemistry Department of the University of California, Berkeley. Penhoet is the immediate past Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the U.S. Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. STEPHEN QUAKE is a Professor of Bioengineering and of Applied Physics at Stanford University. After his postdoctoral work at Stanford, he joined the department of Applied Physics and Physics at the California Institute of Technology at the age of 26. In 2004, he moved back to join the newly formed Department of Bioengineering at Stanford. He has been an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) since 2006. His initial work focused on understanding the biophysics of DNA by building various tools and devices. Hearing about George M. Whitesides's work using polymeric microfluidics, he teamed up with Axel Scherer to develop inexpensive fabrication methods for microfluidic chips for Lab-on-a-chip applications. These new fabrication methods allow for the design of more complicated geometries allow for microfluidic large scale integration. Using these chips, the Quake group has been able to use the chips to create crystals for x-ray crystallography and single- molecule DNA sequencing. In addition to his work at Stanford, he is a cofounder of both Helicos Biosciences and Fluidigm Corporation. In 2002, he was named as one of the Technology Review's TR35. In 2004, he was the recipient of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's Pioneer Award. He is the 2012 winner of the Lemelson–MIT Prize. He earned his B.S. in Physics and M.S. in Mathematics from Stanford and his D.Phil. in Physics from Oxford University in 1994 as a Marshall Scholar. BILL RUTTER is Chairman and CEO of Synergenics, LLC, Chairman Emeritus of Chiron Corporation and Herzstein Professor of Biochemistry Emeritus at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) where he played a key role in developing UCSF in a major scientific contributor. Rutter previously served as a founder and Chairman of Chiron Corporation and member of the Board of Director of Ciba-Greigy/Novartis. He was instrumental in building Chiron into a global biotech power house. In 1999, Dr. Rutter founded Synergenics, LLC, which operates a consortium of commonly-owned but independent biotech companies offering an innovative and cost-effective approach to start-ups in the life sciences industry. In his academic career, Rutter was chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the UCSF.

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APPENDIX C: SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES 55 The department played a key role in developing recombinant DNA technology, genetic engineering and information of biotech companies to develop and exploit technology. During the early days in Chiron, he was concurrently the Director of the Hormone Research Institute at UCSF. Rutter and colleagues have published more than 380 scientific articles and hold more than 25 patents. His lab made several early contributions in biotechnology, including the first cloning of the insulin gene; the development of a process for making a vaccine against hepatitis B virus, the first vaccine based on recombinant DNA methodology. Rutter was elected to the National Academic of Sciences and American Academy of Arts and Sciences more than two decades ago. EILEEN WALKER leads the Association of University Research Parks (AURP), which fosters innovation, commercialization and economic growth in a global economy through university, industry and government partnerships. The organization is comprised of university research, science and tech parks from all around the world. Walker regularly consults with universities and their research parks regarding best practices. In 2011, Walker was tapped by the State Department’s Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board to become a Fulbright Specialist, and serve as an advisor to foreign universities with their university research park initiatives. Her initial assignment was the Universidad de Antonio Nariño in Bogota, on planning for a new research park near Usme, Colombia. Prior to her current role with AURP, Walker directed the Arizona State University Research Park in Tempe, Arizona, for many years. She has served as a member of the Board of Directors of AURP; as an executive officer of the Arizona Bioindustry Association; and on the Board of Directors of Habitat for Humanity Tucson. She is a graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder, and holds a Master of Business Administration in International Management from the American Graduate School of International Management. CHARLES WESSNER is a National Academy Scholar and Director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. Wessner's work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university- industry clusters, regional development, small firm finance, and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on a nation’s investment in research. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and

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56 WORKSHOPS ON TRENDS IN THE INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM achievements of this $2.3 billion award program for small companies and start- ups. He is also directing a major study on best practice in global innovation programs, and is involved in a complementary analysis best practice in state & regional innovation initiatives. The overarching goal of his work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security. ELI YABLONOVITCH is the Director of the NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S), a multi-University Center based at Berkeley. He is also the James & Katherine Lau Chair in Engineering and a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at University of California, Berkeley. Previously, he worked for two years at Bell Telephone Laboratories, before becoming a professor of Applied Physics at Harvard. He then researched photovoltaic solar energy at Exxon, followed by some time at Bell Communications Research, where he was a Distinguished Member of Staff, and also Director of Solid-State Physics Research. In 1992 he joined the University of California, Los Angeles, where he was the Northrop-Grumman Chair Professor of Electrical Engineering. Yablonovitch is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America and the American Physical Society. He is a Life Member of Eta Kappa Nu, and is elected as a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He has been awarded the Harvey Prize (Israel), the IEEE Photonics Award, The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) Mountbatten Medal (UK), the Julius Springer Prize, the R.W. Wood Prize, the W. Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, and the Adolf Lomb Medal. He received his Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from Harvard University in 1972. He also has an honorary Ph.D. from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, and from the Hong Kong Univ. of Science & Technology.