Appendix B

Biographies of Speakers*

KEN ADAMS

Kenneth Adams was confirmed by the Legislature as Empire State Development (ESD) president & CEO and commissioner of the New York State Department of Economic Development on April 5, 2011. In these positions, Mr. Adams works to promote economic practices that attract business and create jobs throughout New York State. He also works closely with Lieutenant Governor Robert J. Duffy to implement the Regional Economic Development Councils across the state.

Mr. Adams came to ESD from The Business Council of New York State, the state’s leading business association, where he served as president and CEO since 2006. He led the organization in its mission of creating “economic growth, good jobs and strong communities across New York State.” The Business Council represents nearly 2,500 member businesses, chambers of commerce and professional and trade associations, employing a total of more than one million New Yorkers.

Prior to leading the Business Council, Mr. Adams was president of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce and director of the MetroTech Business Improvement District in Downtown Brooklyn. He was also the founding executive director of New York Cares, New York City’s leading volunteer organization, from 1988 to 1994. Mr. Adams is a resident of Brooklyn, New York, where he lives with his wife and two children.

DANIEL ARMBRUST

Daniel Armbrust was named president and chief executive officer of SEMATECH in November 2009 with the responsibility to lead the consortium’s advanced technology R&D programs in lithography, front end processes,

__________

*As of April 2013. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium.



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Appendix B Biographies of Speakers KEN ADAMS Kenneth Adams was confirmed by the Legislature as Empire State Development (ESD) president & CEO and commissioner of the New York State Department of Economic Development on April 5, 2011. In these positions, Mr. Adams works to promote economic practices that attract business and create jobs throughout New York State. He also works closely with Lieutenant Governor Robert J. Duffy to implement the Regional Economic Development Councils across the state. Mr. Adams came to ESD from The Business Council of New York State, the state’s leading business association, where he served as president and CEO since 2006. He led the organization in its mission of creating “economic growth, good jobs and strong communities across New York State.” The Business Council represents nearly 2,500 member businesses, chambers of commerce and professional and trade associations, employing a total of more than one million New Yorkers. Prior to leading the Business Council, Mr. Adams was president of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce and director of the MetroTech Business Improvement District in Downtown Brooklyn. He was also the founding executive director of New York Cares, New York City’s leading volunteer organization, from 1988 to 1994. Mr. Adams is a resident of Brooklyn, New York, where he lives with his wife and two children. DANIEL ARMBRUST Daniel Armbrust was named president and chief executive officer of SEMATECH in November 2009 with the responsibility to lead the consortium’s advanced technology R&D programs in lithography, front end processes,  As of April 2013. Appendix includes bios distributed at the symposium. 156

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APPENDIX B 157 interconnect, and metrology, and oversee SEMATECH’s subsidiary, the International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative (ISMI). Armbrust previously spent 25 years at IBM Corporation, culminating in his tenure as vice president of 300 mm Semiconductor Operations for the company’s Systems Technology Group where he was responsible for the operation of IBM’s 300 mm fab in East Fishkill, New York, which develops leading edge technologies with IBM’s alliance partners and manufactures products for IBM and OEM customers. His leadership was marked by successful efforts to improve operating efficiency, lead executive collaborations within the industry, and build strong technical teams. Prior to his role as vice president, Armbrust served as director of 300 mm Engineering and strategic client executive for IBM’s Systems and Technology Group. He began his career at IBM in 1983 and progressed through a variety of assignments in process development, manufacturing, and client engagement. Armbrust earned a bachelor’s degree in ceramic science and engineering from Pennsylvania State University as well as a Master of Science degree in manufacturing systems engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. ROBERT BLACKMAN Robert (Bob) Blackman is currently the vice president of Realty USA as well as the co-founder of Blackman & DeStefano Real Estate. Bob’s impressive list of board involvement includes numerous noteworthy clubs and foundations. Bob is currently board chair of Gildas Club in the Capital Region, whose mission is to create welcoming communities of free support for everyone living with cancer. He is also current vice chairman and board member of the Center for Economic Growth as well as the Executive Committee. This organization has been at the forefront of economic development initiatives and public policy discussions affecting the 1.1 million residents of New York’s Capital Region and Tech Valley. He currently serves as a member of the Fuller Road Management Corporation (FRMC) which manages the facility at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE). Bob is also the vice chair of the AAA Hudson Valley and a trustee of the Fort Orange Club Board. In the past, Bob was the president of Greater Capital Association of Realtors. Bob was also a director of Camp Good Days and Special Times, as well as the March of Dimes. He served as a director on the Upstate Advisory Board of Chase Manhattan Bank, the Albany Memorial Hospital Foundation, the New York State Association of Realtors, and the Albany Country Club. Bob is also the past president of Sales and Marketing Executives Association and the vice chair of the Northeast Foundation. He served as the chair of the WMHT Great Auction in 2006.

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158 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL JONATHAN DORDICK Jonathan S. Dordick received his B.A. degree in biochemistry and chemistry from Brandeis University and his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has held chemical engineering faculty appointments at the University of Iowa (1987-1998), where he also served as the associate director of the Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1998-present) where he is the Howard P. Isermann Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Professor of Biology. In 2008 he took over as director of Rensselaer’s Center for Biotechnology & Interdisciplinary Studies. Prof. Dordick has received numerous awards, including the 2007 Marvin J. Johnson Award, the 2007 Elmer Gaden Award, the 2003 International Enzyme Engineering Award, the 1998 Iowa Section Award of the American Chemical Society, and an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989. He was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2004 and a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers in 1996. He presently serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards for several biotechnology companies and venture capital firms. Dr. Dordick was a co-founder of EnzyMed, Inc. a pharmaceutical and agrochemical discovery company acquired by Albany Molecular Research in 1999, and is a co-founder of Solidus Biosciences, Inc. a venture-stage human drug and cosmetics toxicology company. Dr. Dordick has published over 250 papers and is an inventor/co-inventor on 32 patents and patent applications. JOHANNA DUNCAN-POITIER Johanna Duncan-Poitier currently serves as senior vice chancellor for Community Colleges and the Education Pipeline for The State University of New York (SUNY). She provides system oversight and coordination for SUNY’s 30 community colleges, which are responsible for educating over a quarter of a million students each year. In addition she provides leadership to strengthen teacher preparation and the critical connections between the State University’s 64 campuses and their local PreK–12 schools, business leaders, community-based organizations, and other partners. This work focused is on maximizing student success, increasing graduation rates, improving college- readiness, and preparing a highly-qualified 21st century workforce. Prior to joining SUNY, Ms. Duncan-Poitier served as the senior deputy commissioner of Education—P-16, with responsibility for regulatory oversight of the 700 school districts, 270 colleges and universities (both public and private), and 434 proprietary schools in New York State. She also had the responsibility for the preparation policy and licensure of three quarters of a million licensed professionals in 47 health, business, and design professions. Ms. Duncan-Poitier also serves as one of six New York State Commissioners for the Education Commission of the States, the only

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APPENDIX B 159 nationwide, non-partisan interstate compact devoted to all levels of education. Ms. Duncan-Poitier has been recognized with numerous state and national honors and awards, including: the Governor’s Outstanding Leadership Award; the President’s National Award for Excellence in Administering Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Programs in New York State; the New York State Association for Women in Administration—Pathfinder Award; Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, Saint Joseph’s College; and Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, D’Youville College. Ms. Duncan-Poitier earned a baccalaureate degree from Queens College of The City University of New York and a master's degree in public administration from Bernard M. Baruch College of The City University of New York. THOMAS GUEVARA Thomas Guevara in his capacity as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Regional Affairs directs and supervises the activities of the Economic Development Administration's (EDA) Office of Regional Affairs, including the Performance and National Programs Division and all six EDA Regional Offices. EDA's Regional Offices are responsible for program delivery of investments that fulfill the agency's mission of leading the federal economic development agenda by promoting competitiveness and preparing American regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy. Mr. Guevara brings over 24 years of management experience in financial advisory services, public-private partnership finance, and local economic development consulting. Previously Mr. Guevara worked for the state of Indiana as CIO of the largest state agency, where he was responsible for information technology projects and expenditures in excess of $140 million annually, serving over 8,500 agency users statewide, and administered by over 250 employees and contractors. Mr. Guevara also served as assistant state budget director at the Indiana State Budget Agency, where he headed the Health and Human Services division. Mr. Guevara also has served as an adjunct professor at Indiana University, teaching finance, management, and budgeting courses to graduate and undergraduate students. PRADEEP HALDAR Pradeep Haldar, head of the Nanoengineering Constellation at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, conducts research on advanced fuel cells, advanced photovoltaics (solar power), next generation superconductors, supercapacitors and advanced power electronics. His focus is to support energy and environmental technology deployment through accelerated commercialization by leveraging partnerships between industry, government, and the university. He is executive director of New Energy New York, a consortium of energy related organizations whose objective is to

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160 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL develop and deploy clean energy technologies. He is also vice chair of the U.S. DOE's clean energy incubator alliance and has recently co-authored a report to establish a hydrogen economy in New York State. Haldar received his doctorate in materials science & engineering and solid state chemistry from Northeastern University, and holds an executive MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. SHIRLEY ANN JACKSON The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. Describing her as “a national treasure,” the National Science Board selected Dr. Jackson as its 2007 recipient of the prestigious Vannevar Bush Award for “a lifetime of achievements in scientific research, education, and senior statesman-like contributions to public policy.” Described by Time Magazine (2005) as “perhaps the ultimate role model for women in science,” President Jackson has held senior leadership positions in government, industry, research, and academe. Since 1999, Rensselaer President Shirley Ann Jackson has led an extraordinary transformation of the Institute with an ambitious strategic effort known as The Rensselaer Plan. Guided by her vision, Rensselaer is now home to the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, the Computational Center for Nanotechnology Innovations, the Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center, and the East Campus Athletic Village. Under her leadership, more than 275 new faculty members have been hired, research awards have nearly tripled, and scholarships have increased. Her tenure also has been marked by innovations in curriculum, expansion of undergraduate research, and new award-winning student life initiatives. Nearly $1.25 billion has been invested in The Rensselaer Plan, including more than $725 million in new construction, new equipment, technology, infrastructure, and renovations. In 2001, President Jackson secured a $360 million unrestricted gift to the Institute. In 2004, she launched a $1 billion Renaissance at Rensselaer capital campaign. In 2006, the goal was expanded to $1.4 billion. The campaign closed in 2009, having surpassed the ambitious goal of $1.4 billion in gifts and gift commitments, nine months ahead of schedule, exceeding all previous fund-raising at Rensselaer. Dr. Jackson holds a Ph.D. in theoretical elementary particle physics from MIT and a S.B. in physics from MIT. Her research specialty is in theoretical condensed matter physics, especially layered systems, and the physics of opto-electronic materials. In April, 2009, U.S. President Barack Obama appointed Dr. Jackson to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. PCAST is an advisory group of the nation’s leading scientists and engineers who advise the President and Vice President and formulate policy in the many areas where understanding of science, technology,

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APPENDIX B 161 and innovation is key to strengthening the economy and forming policy that works for the American people. Dr. Jackson is co-chair of the President’s Innovation and Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC), part of the PCAST. Through PCAST, PITAC advises the President on matters involving science, technology, and innovation policy. As PITAC co-chair, in 2011 she co-authored the Report to the President on Ensuring American Leadership in Advanced Manufacturing, which provided an overarching strategy as well as specific recommendations for revitalizing the nation’s leadership in advanced manufacturing. Prior to her leadership of Rensselaer, President Jackson was chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a theoretical physicist conducting basic research at the former AT&T Bell Laboratories, and a professor of theoretical physics at Rutgers University. In 1995 President William Clinton appointed Dr. Jackson to serve as chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. She was chairman of the NRC from 1995 to 1999. As chairman, she was the principal executive officer of and the official spokesman for the NRC. She had ultimate authority for all NRC functions pertaining to an emergency involving an NRC licensee. The NRC is charged with the protection of the public health and safety, the environment, and the common defense and security by licensing, regulating, and safeguarding the use of reactor byproduct material in the United States. This includes power reactors; research, test, and training reactors; fuel cycle facilities; reactor byproduct use in medicine, industry and research; the transportation, storage, and disposal of high-level and low-level radioactive waste; and the licensing of nuclear exports for peaceful uses. While at the NRC, Dr. Jackson initiated a strategic assessment and rebaselining of the agency, leading to a new planning, budgeting, and performance management system that put the NRC on a more businesslike footing. She conceptualized and introduced risk-informed, performance-based regulation to the NRC (utilizing probabilistic risk assessment on a consistent basis), which has been infused throughout its regulatory programs. As a result, NRC Standard Review Plans and associated Regulatory Guides were changed to a risk informed approach. This also led to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) implementing a risk-informed revision to its codes and standards for nuclear power plants and key nuclear components. Elements of risk-informed regulation also have been incorporated into the nuclear regulatory programs of other nations. She led the development of a new reactor oversight program, and created, with the Commission, a license renewal process resulting in the first renewal (in March 2000) of the license of an operating reactor in the United States. While chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Dr. Jackson spearheaded the formation of the International Nuclear Regulators Association (INRA) in May 1997, and was elected as the group’s first chairman, a position she held from 1997 to 1999. As the first INRA chairman, Dr. Jackson guided its development as a high-level forum to examine issues, and to offer

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162 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL assistance to other nations, on matters of nuclear safety. The association is made up of the most senior nuclear regulatory officials from Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States (and now South Korea, with China as an observer). TIMOTHY KILLEEN In June 2012 Dr. Timothy Killeen was appointed president of the RF and SUNY vice chancellor for research. As RF president, Dr. Killeen is the chief executive officer responsible for supervision and operation of the largest, most comprehensive university-connected research foundation in the country. In his dual role, Dr. Killeen is at the center of SUNY’s strategy for the growth of basic, translational, and clinical research. His interaction with campus presidents, provosts, vice presidents for research and economic development, deans, faculty, students and SUNY leadership will drive the implementation of innovative programs, initiatives, resources, policies, infrastructure, investment, and business practices that support SUNY research. Dr. Killeen leads the SUNY Research Council, an advisory body to the SUNY board of trustees, RF board of directors, SUNY provost, and campus presidents. In its advisory capacity, the council sets strategies that encourage and nurture research as one of the primary missions of SUNY, defines principles that govern research throughout the system, and examines research strengths and opportunities throughout SUNY. He also chairs the Patent and Inventions Policy Board, which is charged with developing and interpreting SUNY’s intellectual property, commercialization objectives, and policies to encourage interfaces with industry and the advanced use of SUNY research for the public benefit in furtherance of SUNY’s strategic goals. He appoints, oversees, and supports the performance of RF operations managers who are charged with the management and growth of research at each of the 29 state-operated campuses and collaboratively across the SUNY system, and will report jointly to the RF board of directors and to SUNY’s executive vice chancellor & provost. Prior to joining the RF and SUNY, Dr. Killeen was the National Science Foundation’s assistant director for geosciences beginning in 2008. As head of one of the scientific directorates of the NSF, he managed a funding portfolio of roughly $880 million, up from $750 million when he started. Dr. Killeen was also a Lyall Research Professor at the University of Colorado and, in 2007, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. From 2000 to 2008, he served as director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), one of the premier atmospheric and climate-change research centers in the world and one of most-cited research centers in its fields. He spent more than 20 years on the faculty and in the administration at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, including a term as associate vice president for research. He has been the principal investigator on numerous theoretical and experimental investigations relating to atmospheric and space science, computing and information technology, and educational innovation, and

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APPENDIX B 163 has authored more than 150 publications in referred journals and 300 other publications, papers, and conference proceedings. Dr. Killeen has led major strategic planning processes, including the development of the 10-year strategic plan for the $2.6 billion annual, 13-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program, and has established several significant new programs including the Science, Engineering & Education for Sustainability (SEES) initiative. He has been active in promoting NSF’s international programs, co-founding the Belmont Forum, which gathers representatives of leading government funding agencies worldwide (including NSF), to collaborate on global climate environmental change research. He has served on various White House Committees and Task Forces, testified frequently to Congress and the Executive branch, and is chair of IGFA, the 25 member International Group of Funding Agencies for global change research. Dr. Killeen, a U.S. citizen, grew up in Wales and completed his undergraduate and graduate education at University College London, earning his Ph.D. in atomic and molecular physics at the age of 23. KATHLEEN KINGSCOTT Kathleen Kingscott is senior director of strategic partnerships for IBM Research. She is responsible for working with governments to further collaborative research partnerships, having assumed this role in July 2009. She also serves as the chair of the Semiconductor Industry Association CTO Work Group. In that capacity, she leads the policy work in support of innovative, collaborative research partnerships between semiconductor industry companies and the federal government. Prior to this, Ms. Kingscott held the IBM Industry Chair at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University. She served as visiting professor, teaching classes for senior U.S. military and civilian government executives in science, technology, and innovation policy and in studies of the global electronics industry. In her final year at ICAF, her students won the Antonelli Award for the best industry study and the Commandant’s Award for Outstanding Research in Support of the Director, DDRE. Earlier roles include director of worldwide innovation policy for the IBM Corporation, responsible for worldwide public policy matters regarding innovation, science, and technology. Her global team provided political and legislative support on innovation policy matters ranging from fundamental and applied multidisciplinary research to semiconductor and supercomputing technology policy. She also focused on innovation-based regional economic growth. Ms. Kingscott led IBM's participation in the U.S. National Innovation Initiative, co-chaired by IBM's Chairman and CEO, Sam Palmisano. Separately, she led IBM’s policy work in developing the Trusted Foundry, a partnership between IBM, DoD, and the National Security Agency to develop specialized semiconductors for defense applications. Prior positions include a number of

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164 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL public policy, Congressional relations, information technology marketing, and marketing management positions in IBM. In addition to her work with the Semiconductor Industry Association, Ms. Kingscott founded and served as chair of the Coalition for Technology Partnerships and was a founding partner in establishing the long-running Congressional Visits Day program on Capitol Hill. Ms. Kingscott has been a guest professor on technology and innovation policy, industry/government/university relationships, technology partnerships, corporate public policy organization, advocacy strategy and related topics at Thunderbird University and Princeton University. She has been with IBM for 38 years. MINH LE Minh Le is the program manager of the Solar Energy Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, where he helps manage and balance the portfolio of Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment programs in achieving our national SunShot goals. Prior to his current role at the Energy Department, Minh spent his career in industry developing technologies and scaling new technologies to high- volume manufacturing. Minh earned his S.B. and S.M. degrees from MIT where he held fellowships by the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and the Bose Foundation. MICHAEL LIEHR As CNSE executive vice president of innovation and technology, Michael Liehr focuses on the creation of new business opportunities, develops and manages pertinent administrative and infrastructure operations required to support their establishment, and manages integrated industry-university consortia and public-private partnerships. He is also responsible for the effective and efficient operation of the CNSE core strategic semiconductor and packaging partnership engagements, including the IBM, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, AMAT, TEL, and LAM partnerships. Dr. Liehr is also vice president for research at CNSE, responsible for strategic research and development for nanoelectronics and 3D packaging alliances at CNSE. In a previous assignment at CNSE, Dr. Liehr served as general manager of the Global 450mm Consortium (G450C), where he coordinated the industry- first effort by consortium members Intel, IBM, Samsung, TSMC, GLOBALFOUNDRIES and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) to make available production-grade 450mm processing equipment. Prior to joining CNSE, Dr. Liehr served as an IBM executive responsible for Worldwide Semiconductor Manufacturing Strategic Production Alliances for leading-edge semiconductor products. While at IBM, he was responsible for technology transfer, operations and supply management for outsourced semiconductor production of IBM’s 90nm, 65nm and 45nm

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APPENDIX B 165 semiconductor- on-insulator (SOI)-based microprocessor technologies to Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing in Singapore. In addition, he oversaw management of fabricator synchronization for bulk CMOS 65nm through 32nm with Chartered, Singapore; Samsung, Korea; and ST Microelectronics, France. His experience spans research, product and process development, manufacturing, and semiconductor foundry business P&L. Dr. Liehr holds a Ph.D. in physics, is a certified executive project manager, and has authored or co-authored 20 patents and over 90 publications. AJIT MANOCHA Ajit Manocha is chief executive officer of GLOBALFOUNDRIES. Appointed in 2011, he has strong executive experience in the semiconductor industry, most recently as executive vice president of worldwide operations and a member of the executive management board at Spansion. In that role, Manocha managed global integrated circuit manufacturing, supply chain management and purchasing for its semiconductor division. Manocha also served as an advisor to the Advanced Technology Investment Corporation (ATIC), GLOBALFOUNDRIES' investor. Earlier Manocha was executive vice president and chief manufacturing officer at NXP Semiconductors (formerly Philips Semiconductors). Manocha has also worked at AT&T Microelectronics and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Manocha began his career as a research scientist and was granted over a dozen U.S. and international patents for several inventions in the field of technology for microelectronics, including one for anisotropic etching, a process for treating very-large-scale, patterned integration lithographic masks to retain their shape during processing of VLSI wafers. He currently serves as chairman of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) and is a member of the boards of GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Maskless Lithography. He also serves on the TechNet Executive Committee. He previously sat on the boards of SVTC, International Sematech, the Crolles Alliance, and ASMC, and has also served as chairman of the board of directors of SSMC in Singapore. Manocha holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Delhi and a master's degree in physical chemistry from Kansas State University. DREW MATONAK Andrew J. Matonak assumed the presidency of Hudson Valley Community College on April 18, 2005. President Matonak's tenure is marked by record growth in enrollment and steady progress in completing a $200 million Facilities Master Plan for the college. Construction highlights include the September 2007 dedication of a new, $9.4 million Administration Building; January 2010 opening of TEC-SMART, the Training and Education Center for Semiconductor Manufacturing and Alternative and Renewable Technologies in

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166 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL Malta, NY, and a new 800-space parking garage completed on the Troy campus in August 2010. Enrollment records were set in three consecutive years–fall 2008, 2009, and 2010 when it topped 14,000. In addition, a variety of new academic programs have been introduced, most recently Adolescence Education, Alternative Fuels, Automotive Management, Digital Media, Disability Studies, Entrepreneurship, Physical Sciences, and Polysomnography for those interested in becoming sleep technologists. Construction now is underway on a $35 million state-of-the-art Science Center to be completed by fall 2013 with 25 fully-equipped laboratories for the study of biology, chemistry, physics, biotechnology, earth science and forensics, 11 classrooms, faculty and staff offices, conference spaces, a science study center and a greenhouse. Both Rensselaer County and the State of New York contributed funding for the Science Center and related projects. President Matonak also initiated the college's first comprehensive fundraising campaign, the $10 million "Promise of Our Region" campaign. He will help celebrate the college's 60th anniversary in 2013, while steering the Middle States Association (MSA) reaccreditation process, as required every 10 years. The college has been accredited by the MSA since 1969 and completed its last self study in 2004. The self study evaluates and assesses every aspect of the college's operations, from its mission, goals and objectives, to academics, student services, administration and strategic planning. Off campus, President Matonak is vice president/president-elect of the New York Community College Association of Presidents, chairman of the Albany-Colonie Regional Chamber of Commerce's Board of Directors, and president of Troy 2020. He serves on the boards of the Albany-based Center for Economic Growth, Capital Region Sponsor-A-Scholar, the Rensselaer County Regional Chamber of Commerce and First Niagara Bank's Regional Advisory Board. He also is a member of the Capital Region Workforce Investment Board, the Green Jobs-Green New York Advisory Committee, and the Economic and Workforce Commission of the American Association of Community Colleges. Prior to coming to Hudson Valley Community College, President Matonak served three years as president of Northwest Iowa Community College. His career was shaped by his decision to attend Butler County Community College in Butler, Pennsylvania: He wanted to ensure other students had the same opportunity for success that was given to him. He continued at the College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio, where he earned a bachelor's degree in sociology, followed by a master's degree in student personnel administration from Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, and a doctorate in higher education administration from the University of Houston in Texas. He also served as dean of student affairs at Horry-Georgetown Technical College in Conway, South Carolina; assistant dean of student affairs at the University of Houston; the admissions and records coordinator at Lee College in Baytown, Texas; and assistant dean of student development and

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APPENDIX B 169 development of promising nano-based diagnostics and therapeutics projects and turned them into applications that will eventually benefit cancer patients. Dr. Nagahara also currently represents NCI on the Trans-NIH Nano Task Force, which is tasked to develop NIH-wide scientific and policy vision for nanotechnology, as well as NCI's Project Scientist for the NIH's Nanomedicine Development Centers and NIH's Genes and Environment Initiative (GEI), Exposure Biology Program. Dr. Nagahara has been actively involved in physical sciences and nanotechnology for over 15 years, most notably novel scanning probe microscopy development, carbon nanotube applications, molecular electronics, nanoenergy, and nanosensors. Before joining NCI, he was a distinguished member of the technical staff at Motorola and led their nanosensor effort. He is also currently an adjunct professor in the Department of Physics at Arizona State University and an associate editor of the IEEE Sensors Journal. Dr. Nagahara has published over 80 technical papers and 3 book chapters, and has one book pending as well as over 15 patents issued/filed in these fields. He is an American Physical Society (APS) Fellow and a Nano50 Awardee, and was a member of Motorola's Scientific Advisory Board. GARY PATTON Dr. Gary Patton is vice president of IBM’s Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC), which has major facilities in East Fishkill, New York, Burlington, Vermont, and the Albany Nanotech Research Center in Albany, New York. Under his leadership, IBM’s technology and SRDC teams continue to be at the forefront of innovation in silicon technology, developing IBM’s next-generation SOI, bulk CMOS logic, embedded DRAM, packaging research and development, and 3D Integration. During his career at IBM, Dr. Patton has held various management and executive positions in IBM’s Microelectronics, Storage Technology, and Research divisions, including leadership positions in technology and product development, manufacturing, and business line management. As general manager of the Head and Media Technology business unit, he contributed to the successful merger of the IBM and Hitachi Storage Technology businesses. LUIS PROENZA Luis M. Proenza is chief executive officer of The University of Akron (UA). He has led its transformation into a powerful engine for regional economic development, a catalyst for collaborative initiatives, and the preeminent public university in Northeast Ohio. In 12 years of his leadership, UA’s revenue and research portfolio more than doubled, and private donations established all-time records. His initiatives have distinguished the university nationally and internationally and made it a national model for innovation. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Proenza to serve on the

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170 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, the nation's highest-level policy advisory group for science and technology. Dr. Proenza also is a member of the executive committee for the Council on Competitiveness and its Manufacturing Competitiveness Steering Committee, the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable of the National Academies, the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board for the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He holds a bachelor's degree from Emory University (1965), a master's degree from The Ohio State University (1966), and a doctorate from the University of Minnesota (1971). ANTHONY RITACCIO Anthony Ritaccio is director of the Epilepsy and Human Brain Mapping Program, the only program of its kind in Northeastern New York. He is an expert in the medical and surgical treatment of epilepsy. His team of specialists has exclusive experience in the care of difficult to treat epilepsy. The team focuses on evaluating and treating people with seizures utilizing the most modern techniques and state-of-the-art technology available in order to offer a more accurate and detailed diagnosis of a patient’s condition with goals of seizure freedom through medication or cure through advanced surgical techniques. His approach to patient care is one that is both extremely personal and highly specialized: “I treat each patient from start to finish,” says Dr. Ritaccio. “We are the only comprehensive, multidisciplinary team in the region engaged to cure people with epilepsy.” Apart from his clinical focus, he is engaged in Department of Defense funded research on advanced methods of detecting and using human brain signals to control computers and computerized devices “with thought.” Dr. Ritaccio, professor of neurology and neurosurgery, is also director of the Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratory and the J. Spencer Standish Endowed Chair in Neuroscience. DAVID ROONEY As senior vice president of business development and marketing at the Center for Economic Growth, David oversees the membership development process and implementation of marketing and sales strategies. In addition David is responsible for leading all economic development and marketing related activities specific to six industry sectors: Nanotechnology/Semiconductors, Advanced Materials, Renewable Energy, Information Technology, Bio/Life Sciences, and Homeland Security/Defense. This includes developing strategic global marketing plans for the six industry sectors; sales calls and presentations

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APPENDIX B 171 to industry executives; prospect coordination; market research; and collaborating with local economic developers on specific projects. David Rooney brings 25 years of corporate and government experience in economic development, marketing, public relations, business development and strategic planning to his role at CEG. He is a graduate of the University at Albany, State University of New York. MICHAEL RUSSO Michael Russo is the director of government relations and regulatory affairs for GLOBALFOUNDRIES, the world’s second largest contract semiconductor manufacturer. He spearheads initiatives that connect his industry to civic, government, education, labor, and business leaders across the United States, and was involved in bringing President Obama to New York to talk about growing manufacturing and increasing the nation’s exports. Russo has been at GLOBALFOUNDRIES since 2009, during which time he completed his B.S. in interdisciplinary studies at the Northeast Center, partly through prior-learning assessment, which incorporated his breadth of experiences as a foundation of his degree. Soon after high school, Mr. Russo became shop steward at Owens Corning for the Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics & Allied Workers International Union. He rose through the ranks first to be president locally, and finally to be an executive officer at the national level, with expertise in organizational development, arbitration and negotiation. In this role, Russo was acutely attuned to politicians sympathetic to the middle class, worker-employer relationships, the problem of American jobs being exported overseas and the importance of the U.S. remaining competitive in the global marketplace. He also became a close advisor to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who was instrumental in facilitating support for GLOBALFOUNDRIES. From her office, he moved to GLOBALFOUNDRIES. DONALD SIEGEL Donald Siegel is dean of the School of Business and professor of management at the University at Albany, SUNY. He also serves as president of the Technology Transfer Society, a non-profit organization devoted to interdisciplinary analysis of entrepreneurship and technology transfer from universities and federal laboratories to firms. He received his bachelor’s degree in economics and his master’s and doctoral degrees in business economics from Columbia University. He then served as a Sloan Foundation post-doctoral fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research, under the supervision of the late Zvi Griliches at Harvard. Don has taught at SUNY-Stony Brook, Arizona State University, the University of Nottingham, RPI, where was he was chair of the Economics Department, and the University of California-Riverside, where he served as associate dean for Graduate Studies. Dr. Siegel is co-editor

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172 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL of Academy of Management Perspectives, editor of the Journal of Technology Transfer, an associate editor of the Journal of Productivity Analysis, and serves on the editorial boards of Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Journal of Management Studies, Journal of Business Venturing, Corporate Governance: An International Review, and Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal. He has also co-edited 32 special issues of leading journals in economics, management, and finance. Don was recently ranked #2 in the world for research on university entrepreneurship and #760 in the world among academic economists. He has published 97 articles and 6 books on issues relating to university technology transfer and entrepreneurship, the effects of corporate governance on economic performance, productivity analysis, and corporate and environmental social responsibility in such leading journals in economics, finance, and management as the American Economic Review, Economic Journal, The Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Law and Economics, Journal of Financial Economics, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Research Policy, Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Perspectives, Academy of Management Learning & Education, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management Studies, and Journal of Management. His most recent books are Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Technological Change (Oxford University Press) and the Oxford Handbook of Corporate Social Responsibility (Oxford University Press). He is currently co- editing the Handbook of University Technology Transfer (University of Chicago Press), the Oxford Handbook of Corporate Governance (Oxford University Press), and the Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Gambling (Oxford University Press). Dr. Siegel has received grants or fellowships from the Sloan Foundation, NSF, Kauffman Foundation, NBER, American Statistical Association, W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, and the U.S. Department of Labor. He has also served as a consultant or advisor to the United National; National Research Council; the Council on Competitiveness; the U.K., Italian, and Swedish governments; the Department of Justice; the Environmental Protection Agency; Chase Manhattan; Securities Industry Association; Morgan Stanley; Goldman Sachs & Co; Deloitte and Touche; and the National Association of Manufacturers. Professor Siegel was a member of the Advisory Committee to the Secretary of Commerce on “Measuring Innovation in the 21st Century Economy” and a member of Governor David Patterson’s Small Business Task Force. He is co-chair of the NRC Committee on “Best Practice in National Innovation Programs for Flexible Electronics” and an advisor to the NRC on the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. In 2011, Dr. Siegel testified before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding re-authorization of the SBIR program. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Research Foundation of the State University of New York.

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APPENDIX B 173 PHILLIP SINGERMAN Phillip Singerman serves as associate director for innovation and industry services at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In this capacity he is responsible for the NIST suite of external partnership programs, including the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership, the Technology Innovation Program, the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, and NIST technology transfer and small business innovation research awards. The position of associate director was established in October 2010 as part of the first major realignment of NIST programs in 20 years; Mr. Singerman was appointed to this position in January 2011. Immediately prior to joining NIST, he was a senior vice president at B&D Consulting, a DC-based firm providing strategic advice and technical assistance on federal economic development programs to non-profit organizations, local governments, and universities. Previously he was a managing director of a $120 million seed stage venture fund that invested in early stage technologies. Mr. Singerman has more than 30 years of experience in tech-based economic development; he was the first chief executive of two of the best known public-private partnerships, the Ben Franklin Technology Center of Southeastern Pennsylvania and the Maryland Technology Development Corporation. During the Clinton Administration he served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development, a Presidential appointment requiring Senate confirmation. Mr. Singerman has participated on scores of local, state, and national advisory boards and associations, including the State Science and Technology Institute, the Technology Council of Maryland, the International Economic Development Council, NGA’s Advisory Committee on Entrepreneurial Policy, NSF’s Small Business Advisory Committee, the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Association, the Strengthening America’s Communities Initiative Advisory Committee, and the Editorial Board of the Economic Development Quarterly. Mr. Singerman received his bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College and holds a doctorate from Yale University. He has taught at Yale College, Barnard College (Columbia University), and the Fels Institute of Government (University of Pennsylvania). After graduating from college he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia, South America, working in rural community development projects. Mr. Singerman is a co-author of “Beyond Recovery: Moving the Gulf Coast Toward a Sustainable Future” (February 2011), published by the Center for American Progress and Oxfam America, and the “Handbook on Climate Prosperity” (May 2009), published by the International Economic Development Council.

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174 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL REX SMITH Rex Smith is editor and vice president of the Times Union, the dominant communication medium in New York’s Capital Region. He has led the Albany newspaper since mid-2002 to national recognition for writing, reporting, photography and design, both in print and on the Web. He is a former national correspondent and bureau chief for Newsday, and previously edited community newspapers in New York and Indiana. Earlier in his career, he was a congressional aide in Washington and a television reporter and anchor in the metropolitan New York region. He has received numerous professional citations and awards, including the Distinguished Service Award of the national Society of Professional Journalists, a Pulitzer Fellowship, and a Rotary Fellowship. He is a graduate cum laude of Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, and received his master’s degree with highest honors from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Rex hosts a nationally syndicated weekly program, “The Media Project,” on Northeast Public Radio, is past president of the state press association and vice chair of the state Fair Trial/Free Press Conference. He has been a national leader in efforts to build news literacy among students. Outside journalism, Rex is known as a singer: He is a member of Albany Pro Musica, one of the Northeast’s premiere choral ensembles. Rex lives in Rensselaer County with his wife, the author Marion Roach Smith, and their 17-year-old daughter, Grace Yu Ying Smith. DARREN SUAREZ Darren Suarez is a director of government affairs, with responsibility for all advocacy on energy, environmental and occupational safety, and health issues. Darren comes to The Business Council from Hinman Straub LLC, where he lobbied on behalf of a number of Fortune 500 companies on energy and environment issues. Before that, Darren was the program director for environmental and economic development for the New York State Senate, where he represented the Majority Leader in meetings and public event, and developed, amended, and negotiated economic development tax incentives. Previously, he was a government affairs representative for the City University of New York and Cornell University, and worked for the New York State Department of Labor as a job services representative working with employers to meet their workforce needs. Darren holds a degree in political science from UMass–Dartmouth. He was the recipient of the 2006 Economic Development Service Award in recognition of work in attracting GLOBAL FOUNDRIES to construct a $3.2 billion 300 mm-wafer fab in New York State. He was awarded the 2005 New York Nature Conservancy’s Salamander Award for working to protect New York’s biodiversity and a joint recipient of the 2004 National Conference of

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APPENDIX B 175 State Legislatures Staff Chair Award for work as a primary author of New York’s Brownfield Cleanup Program. PAUL TONKO Congressman Paul Tonko is a third term member of the United States House of Representatives. He currently represents New York’s 20th Congressional District, including the cities of Albany, Schenectady, Troy, Saratoga Springs, and his hometown of Amsterdam. Paul has been a champion for the middle class, job creation, economic opportunity, providing senior citizens the opportunity to retire with dignity and the mental health community throughout his career. For the 113th Congress, Paul was named as a member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, the oldest standing committee in the House. First created in December of 1795, the committee has jurisdiction over national energy policy, public and mental health policy, and regulation of interestate and foreign commerce, giving it the broadest jurisdiction of any authorizing committee in the House. Paul is the first upstate New York Democratic member of the committee since Leo O'Brien, who resigned the post in October 1966. Previously, Paul has served on the Science, Space and Technology Committee, Natural Resources Committee, Budget Committee, and Education and Workforce Committee. He continues to fight to bring clean energy jobs to the Capital Region to ensure it maintains its status as one of the fastest growing clean technology hubs in the country. Paul believes in the power of America’s middle and working class families and is fighting to ensure the American Dream stays within reach for all who work hard and play by the rules. As a former member of the Budget Committee, Paul offered the lead amendment to the Ryan Budget to protect Medicare and was instrumental in fighting to protect the program from ending. Building on his work in the New York State Assembly, where he fought for one of the nation’s strongest mental health parity laws, known as Timothy’s Law, Paul continues to promote mental health parity at the federal level and serves as a co-chair of the Mental Health Caucus. Prior to joining Congress, Paul was the president and CEO of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Before that, he served in the New York State Assembly for 25 years, 15 of which he was the chair of the Assembly Energy Committee. At the age of 26, Paul was the youngest person in the history of Montgomery County to be elected to the County’s Board of Supervisors, which he chaired until 1981. Paul graduated from Clarkson University with a degree in mechanical and industrial engineering. He is a lifelong resident of the city of Amsterdam, New York.

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176 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL BRIAN TOOHEY Brian C. Toohey is the president & CEO of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA). Joining the association in 2010, Mr. Toohey brings more than two decades of experience and knowledge in both federal and international affairs as well as working in innovative technology, medical device, and pharmaceutical industries. At SIA, Mr. Toohey is responsible for setting and leading the public policy agenda and serving as the primary advocate for maintaining U.S. leadership in semiconductor design and manufacturing. Mr. Toohey works closely with SIA member companies and the Board of Directors to align industry priorities and policy goals. Prior to joining SIA, Mr. Toohey held key executive leadership positions, both in federal and international affairs at Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA). Previously, he was a senior vice president at DEKA Research and Development, a medical device company, and at the wireless network operator and service provider AirCell, Inc. Mr. Toohey also served as the director of international government affairs & strategic planning and a director of the European business unit at the global satellite company, Iridium LLC. Prior to joining the private sector, Mr. Toohey worked for several years at the U.S. Department of Commerce, primarily on European trade and intellectual property issues. Mr. Toohey received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. He is a member of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s and United States Trade Representative’s International Trade Advisory Committee and an advisor to F.I.R.S.T., a leading nonprofit organization that brings science and technology to America’s schools. Mr. Toohey has served as a member of the U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy and as an adjunct professor of science, technology, and international affairs at Georgetown University. A Boston native, Mr. Toohey and his wife reside in Washington, DC. MICHAEL TUCKER F. Michael Tucker was appointed president of the Center for Economic Growth (CEG) in March 2007. The Center for Economic Growth is a regional, not-for-profit, private-sector economic development organization promoting growth through accomplishment of strategic initiatives, industry attraction, and regional outreach. Prior to joining CEG, Mike served as president of the Harriman Research and Technology Development Corporation where he was responsible for initiating and overseeing the redevelopment of the 300-acre W.A. Harriman State Office Campus into a world class Research and Technology Park. For more than 25 years Mike was a principal with Mercer Companies, Inc., an Albany based real estate and energy development firm. Mr. Tucker oversaw the development, financing and operation of Mercer’s commercial office, senior

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APPENDIX B 177 housing and hydroelectric projects throughout New York State. In addition, he was responsible for Mercer’s property management and real estate brokerage services. Mr. Tucker’s has extensive experience in business, economic development and energy related issues. Mike is a graduate of Villanova University and the Villanova School of Law. He is an attorney and a licensed real estate broker. He is active in legal, real estate, and economic development organizations at the local, state, and national levels. He served as the chairman of the Town of Bethlehem Industrial Development Agency and he is a trustee of Ulster Savings Bank. He currently serves as a director of the New York State Economic Development Council and is on the boards of numerous not-for-profit organizations throughout Tech Valley. JOHN WEN John Ting-Yung Wen received his B.Eng. from McGill University in 1979, M.S. from University of Illinois in 1981, and Ph.D. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1985, all in electrical engineering. From 1981 to 1982, he was a system engineer at Fisher Controls where he developed a plant-wide coordination control system for pulp and paper plants. From 1985 to 1988, he was a member of technical staff at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he developed new modeling and control algorithms for large space structures and space robots. Since 1988, he has been with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute where he is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering with a joint appointment in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering. Since July 2005, he has been the director of a New York State sponsored interdisciplinary center, Center for Automation Technologies and Systems (CATS). He was the interim director of the Smart Lighting Center, an NSF Engineering Research Center involving six partner universities, from June 2009 to December 2009. Dr. Wen was an ASEE/NASA summer faculty fellow in 1993, a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) senior visiting scientist in 1997, and an Oversea Assessor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2004 to 2009. Dr. Wen has over 200 technical publications in leading journals and conferences. His research interest lies in the general area of dynamical systems modeling and control with applications to high performance motion systems, robot manipulation, opto-mechatronics systems, thermal management, and aerodynamic flow control. Dr. Wen is a Fellow of IEEE. CHARLES WESSNER Charles Wessner is a National Academy Scholar and director of the Program on Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. He is recognized nationally and internationally for his expertise on innovation policy, including

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178 NEW YORK’S NANOTECHNOLOGY MODEL public-private partnerships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign governments, universities, research institutes, and international organizations, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. He has a strong commitment to international cooperation, reflected in the recent honor bestowed on him with his nomination as an Officer of the Order of Merit by the President of the Republic of France. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government measures to encourage entrepreneurship and support the development of new technologies and the cooperation between industry, universities, laboratories, and government to capitalize on a nation’s investment in research. Foremost among these is the congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2.7 billion award program for small companies and start- ups. He is also leading an assessment of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership that includes a review of major foreign manufacturing support programs such as the German Fraunhofer, Taiwan’s ITRI, Canada’s IRAP, and the French Carnot centres. He just completed directing a major study of global innovation programs, entitled Comparative National Innovation Policies: Best Practice for the 21st Century. The overarching goal of Dr. Wessner’s work is to develop a better understanding of how we can bring new technologies forward to address global challenges in health, climate, energy, water, infrastructure, and security. NANCY ZIMPHER On June 1, 2009, Nancy L. Zimpher became the 12th Chancellor of The State University of New York, the nation’s largest comprehensive system of higher education. A nationally recognized leader in education, Chancellor Zimpher spearheaded and launched a new strategic plan for SUNY in her first year as chancellor. The central goal of the plan, called The Power of SUNY, is to harness the university’s potential to drive economic revitalization and create a better future for every community across New York. Chancellor Zimpher is active in numerous state and national education organizations and is a leader in the areas of teacher preparation, urban education, and university-community engagement. As co-founder of Strive, a community- based cradle-to-career collaborative, Chancellor Zimpher has been instrumental in creating a national network of innovative systemic partnerships that holistically address challenges across the education pipeline. She has authored or co-authored numerous books, monographs, and academic journal articles on

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APPENDIX B 179 teacher education, urban education, academic leadership, and school/university partnerships. Chancellor Zimpher currently serves as chair of the Board of Governors of the New York Academy of Sciences and of CEOs for Cities. From 2005 to 2011, she chaired the national Coalition of Urban Serving Universities. She also recently co-chaired NCATE’s blue-ribbon panel on transforming teacher preparation. She previously served as president of the University of Cincinnati, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and executive dean of the Professional Colleges and dean of the College of Education at The Ohio State University. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English Education and Speech, a master’s degree in English Literature, and a Ph.D. in Teacher Education and Higher Education Administration, all from The Ohio State University.