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2 COMPUTER GRAPHICS SYSTEMS IN PLACE TODAY DEPARTMENT OP STATE, OFFICE OF FOREIGN BUILDINGS OPERATIONS (FBO) At this time, FBO does not have CAD systems installed. It does have MS-DOS-driven hardware with commercially available graphics systems such as the Aldus pagemaker and Microsoft chart. These are used primarily for developing presentation material. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER FOR BUILDING TECHNOLOGY (NIST/CBT) Many different computer graphics systems are used throughout NIST for research activities. Within the Structures Division of CBT computer graphics systems include Vax 11/750, Raster Technologies Model One/80, Evans/Sutherland PS 390, and Seiko hard copy devices. These are used primarily for solid modeling and finite element analyses. NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND (NAVFAC) Computer graphics systems currently in use include:

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• Graphic Engineering and Mapping System I (GEMS I); ComputerVision turnkey CDS 4000 minicomputer systems, • Engineering Microcomputer Graphics: Modular Engineering Design System (EMG/MEDS); 80386SX/80387-based microcomputers using AutoCAD or equal plus AutoCAD AEC, AutoCAD Mechanical and other third party support software. Current applications include: real estate and base mapping, master planning, facilities design (quarters, magazines and medical facilities), preliminary design, and design contract drawings. THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE (PHS) The Facilities Engineering Branch of PHS currently uses Compaq 386 microcomputers with AutoCAD software, 2 digitizers (Hitachi & Calcomp), and a plotter (Houston Inst.)- These are used for the preparation of archive drawings of the National Institute of Health's facilities and grounds. Site drawings of utility and facility lay- outs are being developed for reference purposes. These will be utilized in an on-going "Infrastructure Enhance- ment Program" which will completely renovate, expand and replace existing utility generating and distribution systems throughout the campus. U.S. POSTAL SERVICE (USPS) Office of Design and Construction The primary CAD systems in use are Intergraph and AutoCAD. The Postal Service has developed specialized software for these systems, through which the working drawings for constructing new post offices can be prepared.

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CAD-based software running on Intergraph enables almost immediate design of small post offices. Other standard plans for small post offices run on AutoCAD, using IBM compatible microcomputers. The design of medium-sized post offices, which extend in size up to 35,000 square feet, is accomplished through the computerized assembly of predesigned functional modules that meet the specific needs of each facility. With this CAD process, complete working drawings are prepared in under eight weeks. This software runs on all three CAD systems listed above. AutoCAD-based CAD software is used to plan new facilities, including layouts of mechanization. The resulting plans are then transferred to architect-engineer firms for completion of working drawings. Office of Operations. Methods. Systems, and Quality Current computer graphics systems in use in this office include: • Compaq Deskpro 386/33 mhs • Monitronix MX-210 19" color monitor • HP Laser Jet III printer plotter Hewlett Packard A-E size model EXL plotter • Digitizer, Summagraphics Summasketch model MM1201 • AutoCAD version 10 • Compaq DOS 3.31 • AutoCAD AEC architectural template • The space program by Graphics Systems • CAD overlay • Procomm Plus Current applications include layout of postal facili- ties, mapping for zip+4 areas and delivery routes, pre- liminary operating system designs and operating system designs.

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DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) The majority of construction projects within the Department of Veterans Affairs are performed at 172 medical centers. Each medical center has an engineering department which is responsible for many functions including those related to project design, construction, and facility management. The project sections within Engineering Service at the medical centers use a variety of CAD systems such as Accugraph, AutoCAD, Cadvance, and Versacad. By far, the most widely used system consists of AutoCAD running on a 386 or 486 based PC. The Office of Facilities in Washington uses an Intergraph based system for in-house preliminary work on a small number of projects. All DVA medical centers are running standardized software and hardware which includes space information, project information, etc. on our DHCP (Decentralized Hospital Computer Program) systems. All of the software was developed in-house in the MUMPS language. DVA is presently testing the integration of prototype CAD systems into the DHCP system. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICE (GSA/PBS) The use of computer-aided design for real estate func- tions has been endorsed by PBS and several CAD systems are being used by the various PBS regional offices. The most prevalent is AutoCAD but some regions are using Versacad and Acugraph. AutoCAD version 10 has been selected as the standard software package for PBS. These systems are used for space planning, for the layout of space, and for related demolition and construc- tion projects, e.g., wall locations and telephone and electrical wiring.

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PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY (PANYNJ) # OF CADD SYSTEM HARDWARE PLATFORM WORKSTATIONS ComputerVision CDS4000 ComputerVision 200X 14 Mini Computer ComputerVision CADD Sun 4 Series 10 Workstation 386-based PC 6 ComputerVision Personal 386-based PC 15 Designer Micad 386-based PC 3 CADD has been put to a variety of uses at the Port Authority by several departments (Engineering, Aviation, World Trade, Rails, General Services, Ports). Among the classes of projects using CADD are: 1) Capital Expansion (e.g., airport taxiway extensions, airport redevelopment, electrified rail station rehabilitation, roadway design), 2) Maintenance, 3) Real estate marketing, and 4) Facility management. Within the Engineering Department, CADD is used for the following: 1) Civil: roadway/site design and plan production; mapping; surveying, 2) Structural: plan production for bridges/ buildings, 3) Mechanical: HVAC layout and plan production; plumbing; mechanical equipment room layout and design, 4) Electrical: wiring/lighting diagrams, 5) Architecture: 3-D architectural building design; architectural plan production, and 6) Geotechnical: soil boring logs.

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U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (CoE) The Corps of Engineers, in its third year of a con- tract with Intergraph, has installed 300 workstations in 29 offices. Also installed are 350 copies of Intergraph CADD Software (MicroStation PC) which runs on MS-DOS microcomputers. A typical configuration at a large design office includes a dual MicroVAX, six dual screen UNIX- based workstations, four single screen UNIX based work- stations, and sixteen 80386-based PC's running Micro- Station, all on the same network. AutoCAD maintains a strong hold in many offices. The loyalty to AutoCAD is reported to be due to the high level of familiarity and expertise. The systems are being used for a variety of tasks including design and production for architectural, civil, structural, mechanical, electrical, geological, and topo- graphical work. Specific applications are being used to perform subsets of the overall process. The majority of time devoted to CADD use is for production and editing of construction documentation. However, designers are beginning to take advantage of CADD capabilities to a greater degree for design and design studies in the structural and mechanical areas. The current CADD contract has emphasized advanced design packages where the construction drawings are a by- product of design. The 3-dimensional capability of these systems is expected to greatly improve our analysis of complex system interfaces in our major facility designs. NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA) NASA's Facilities Engineering Division currently uses the following computer graphics systems: IBM AT's with AutoCAD, IBM PC's with Anvil 5000, CASE 2000, • Apple Macintosh with MacDraw, AutoCAD, VersaCAD, CADAM

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• Microcadam • ComputerVision They are used for facility drawings and site utilities mapping. AIR FORCE DIRECTORATE OF ENGINEERING AND SERVICES (AF) Over the past several years, the Engineering and Services communities have been developing and implementing an Integrated Graphics Systems (IGS) that includes CADD. AAM/FM and CIS. In the late 1970s, an early Intergraph system was in use at one location to display ground com- munications lines as overlays to base maps. Since that time, approximately 75 (of about 140) Air Force Civil Engineering organizations have placed CADD in operation. The extent of actual operation varies at each base, from a single user, stand-alone CADD system, to the highly com- plex, multi-user work stations capable of performing all required tasks within the IGS platform. Hardware varies from the Intergraph Intervue two screen workstations in place at several large industrial installations to 286 and 386 hardware by various manufacturers, running AutoCAD software, in place at many other installations. Under the Air Force's Base Comprehensive Planning program, about half of the installations have completed vector CADD digital maps, which now follow an Air Force- wide standard for layering, design file structure, sym- bology, etc. There is a similar standard for archi- tectural and engineering services required for facility design. Numerous on-going initiatives at various installations are evaluating ways to better integrate different data bases to ensure that future software/hardware platforms will have the interoperability to meet the Air Force mission. An example is a Defense Mapping Agency-supported research effort at the Department of Economics and geography at the U.S. Air Force Academy to investigate the potential benefits and the several integration problems

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associated with various CIS software applications to the USAF. The Air Force Academy also created a micro-based computer called Combat Readiness and Infrastructure Support Icon Software (CRISIS) which is a third-party application program under AutoCAD. CRISIS can be used by bases to perform Base Comprehensive Planning analyses; to develop facility requirements for force beddowns, exer- cises, and force deployments; and to function as an Air Base Operability peacetime training model, and a wartime combat support assessment model. CRIS, which can be used on a laptop computer by personnel deployed in the field, is being made available across the USAF. Twice a year, people running these various initiatives meet to review, advise and crossfeed information to help establish guidance, policy and standards for the engineer- ing community. Key players from the installations, major commands, Air Staff and the Air Force Academy are leading the way for a true interactive IGS platform for the 90s. 10