Appendix A

Biographies

Joint Advisory Group

 

John Ahearne, executive director emeritus of Sigma Xi, was director of the Ethics Program of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, where he was director from 1997 to 1999 and executive director from 1989 to 1997. Dr. Ahearne was elected to NAE membership in 1996 “for leadership in energy policy and the safety and regulation of nuclear power.” He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Stephanie J. Bird is coeditor of Science and Engineering Ethics, a journal that explores ethical issues of concern to scientists and engineers. Formerly she was special assistant to the provost of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she was responsible for the development of educational programs addressing ethical issues in research and the professional responsibilities of scientists and engineers. Her current work emphasizes the ethical, legal, and social policy implications of scientific research, especially in neuroscience, as well as teaching the responsible conduct of research and research ethics in science and engineering.

Felice Levine is executive director of the American Educational Research Association, where her work focuses on research and science policy issues, research ethics, data access and sharing, the scientific and academic workforce, and higher education. She was previously associate editor of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics. She is a fellow of the AAAS, the American Educational Research Association, and the Association for Psychological Science, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and past president of the Law and Society Association.

W. Carl Lineberger is the E.U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and a fellow of JILA in Boulder. His work is primarily experimental, using a wide variety of laser-based techniques to study structure and reactivity of gas phase ions. He has been awarded the H.P. Broida Prize in Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and the Earle K. Plyler Prize by the American Physical Society, the Meggers Prize by the Optical Society of America, and the Michelson Prize by the Coblentz Society. He has received the Irving Langmuir Prize in chemical physics and the Peter Debye Prize in physical chemistry from the American Chemical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1983), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1995), a fellow of AAAS and the American Physical Society, and a member of Sigma Xi and the American Chemical Society.

Michael C. Loui is professor of electrical and computer engineering and University Distinguished Teacher-Scholar at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He conducts



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Appendix A Biographies Joint Advisory Group John Ahearne, executive director emeritus of Sigma Xi, was director of the Ethics Program of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, where he was director from 1997 to 1999 and executive director from 1989 to 1997. Dr. Ahearne was elected to NAE membership in 1996 “for leadership in energy policy and the safety and regulation of nuclear power.” He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Stephanie J. Bird is coeditor of Science and Engineering Ethics, a journal that explores ethical issues of concern to scientists and engineers. Formerly she was special assistant to the provost of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she was responsible for the development of educational programs addressing ethical issues in research and the professional responsibilities of scientists and engineers. Her current work emphasizes the ethical, legal, and social policy implications of scientific research, especially in neuroscience, as well as teaching the responsible conduct of research and research ethics in science and engineering. Felice Levine is executive director of the American Educational Research Association, where her work focuses on research and science policy issues, research ethics, data access and sharing, the scientific and academic workforce, and higher education. She was previously associate editor of the Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics. She is a fellow of the AAAS, the American Educational Research Association, and the Association for Psychological Science, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and past president of the Law and Society Association. W. Carl Lineberger is the E.U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and a fellow of JILA in Boulder. His work is primarily experimental, using a wide variety of laser-based techniques to study structure and reactivity of gas phase ions. He has been awarded the H.P. Broida Prize in Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and the Earle K. Plyler Prize by the American Physical Society, the Meggers Prize by the Optical Society of America, and the Michelson Prize by the Coblentz Society. He has received the Irving Langmuir Prize in chemical physics and the Peter Debye Prize in physical chemistry from the American Chemical Society. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1983), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1995), a fellow of AAAS and the American Physical Society, and a member of Sigma Xi and the American Chemical Society. Michael C. Loui is professor of electrical and computer engineering and University Distinguished Teacher-Scholar at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He conducts 73  

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research in computational complexity theory, professional ethics, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has served as executive editor of College Teaching since 2006, and as editor of the Journal of Engineering Education since 2012. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar and elected fellow of the IEEE. He was associate dean of the Graduate College at Illinois from 1996 to 2000. He directed the theory of computing program at the National Science Foundation from 1990–1991. Robert M. Nerem is the Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair for Engineering in Medicine, Institute Professor, and Founding Director of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB) at Georgia Tech. From 1995 to 2009 he served as director of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB), a research institute whose mission is to integrate engineering, information technology, and the life sciences in the conduct of biomedical research. He served on a part-time basis from 2003 to 2006 as the senior advisor for bioengineering in the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) newest institute, the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. In recognition of his work, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1988 and to the Institute of Medicine in 1992. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and past president of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering and the International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine. He was the founding president of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, served on the Science Board of the Food and Drug Administration from 2000 to 2003, and received the NAE Founders Award in 2008. Participant Bios Heather E. Canary is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Utah. Her work appears in several books, including The International Encyclopedia of Communication and Communication and Organizational Knowledge: Contemporary Issues for Theory and Practice. She has published articles in The American Journal of Public Health, Communication Theory, Health Communication, The Journal of Applied Communication Research, The Journal of Business Ethics, and Management Communication Quarterly, among other scholarly journals. Dr. Canary has been co-principal investigator for two interdisciplinary projects of graduate ethics education funded by the National Science Foundation and she was a Lincoln Ethics Teaching Fellow at Arizona State University. Her teaching infuses ethical considerations in courses ranging from communication theory to organizational communication. Her primary research focus is human communication across lay and professional groups, particularly processes of knowledge construction and decision making in contexts of public policies, health, and disability. She completed her PhD at Arizona State University in 2007. Michael Davis is a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions and professor of philosophy at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Before coming to IIT in 1986, he taught at Case Western Reserve University, Illinois State, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. In 1985–86, he held a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship. He has published more than 190 articles (and chapters) and authored seven books: To Make the Punishment Fit the Crime (Westview, 1992); Justice in the Shadow of Death (Rowman & 74  

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Littlefield, 1996); Thinking Like an Engineer (Oxford, 1998); Ethics and the University (Routledge, 1999); Profession, Code, and Ethics (Ashgate, 2002); Actual Social Contract and Political Obligation (Mellen, 2002); and Code Writing: How Software Engineering Became a Profession (Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions, 2007). He also edited or coedited Ethics and the Legal Professions (Prometheus, 1986; 2nd edition, 2009); AIDS: Crisis in Professional Ethics (Temple, 1994); Conflict of Interest in the Professions (Oxford, 2001); and Engineering Ethics (Ashgate, 2005). Since 1991, he has held—among other grants—four from the National Science Foundation to integrate ethics into technical courses. C.K. Gunsalus is director of the National Center for Professional and Research Ethics (NCPRE), professor emerita of business, and a research professor at the UIUC Coordinated Sciences Laboratory. She has been on the faculty of the UIUC colleges of Business, Law, and Medicine and served as special counsel in the Office of University Counsel. In the College of Business, she teaches leadership and ethics in the MBA program and is the director of the required professional responsibility course for all undergraduates in the college. She was a member of the faculty of the Medical Humanities/Social Sciences program in the College of Medicine, where she taught communication, conflict resolution skills, and ethics. A licensed attorney, Ms. Gunsalus graduated magna cum laude from the University of Illinois College of Law and has an AB with distinction in history from UIUC. She served on the Committee on Research Integrity of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the National Research Council’s Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable Ad Hoc Group on Conflict of Interest. She was a member of the US Commission on Research Integrity and served four years as chair of the AAAS Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility. In 2004, she was elected a AAAS fellow in recognition of her “sustained contributions to the national debate over improving the practical handling of ethical, legal, professional and administrative issues as they affect scientific research.” She has served on the Illinois Supreme Court’s Commission on Professionalism since 2005. She has a written book on survival skills for academic leaders, The College Administrator’s Survival Guide (Harvard University Press, 2006), and one about preventing and responding to workplace challenges, The Young Professional’s Survival Guide: From Cab Fares to Moral Snares (Harvard University Press, 2012). Joseph R. Herkert, DSc, is Lincoln Associate Professor of Ethics and Technology in the School of Letters and Sciences and the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University. He has been teaching engineering ethics and science, technology, and society courses for 25 years. He is coeditor of The Growing Gap Between Emerging Technologies and Legal- Ethical Oversight: The Pacing Problem (Springer, 2011), editor of Social, Ethical and Policy Implications of Engineering: Selected Readings (Wiley/IEEE Press, 2000), and has published numerous articles on engineering ethics and societal implications of technology in engineering, law, social science, and applied ethics journals. Current projects include ethical and legal issues related to emerging technologies, integrating micro- and macroethics in graduate science and engineering education, and societal implications of the smart grid. Herkert was editor of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, published by the Society on Social Implications of Technology (SSIT) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He has served as SSIT president (1995–1996) and is currently a member of the SSIT board of governors. In 2007 he was the first recipient of the SSIT Distinguished Service Award. Herkert is a senior member of IEEE and recently completed a three-year term on the IEEE Ethics and Member 75  

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Conduct Committee. He is a distinguished life member of the executive board of the National Institute for Engineering Ethics, an associate editor of the journal Engineering Studies, a board member of the Engineering Ethics Division of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), and past chair of the Liberal Education/Engineering and Society (LEES) Division of ASEE. In 2005 Herkert received the Sterling Olmsted Award, the highest honor bestowed by LEES, for “making significant contributions in the teaching and administering of liberal education in engineering education.” Herkert received his BS in electrical engineering from Southern Methodist University and his doctorate in engineering and policy from Washington University in St. Louis. He is a former registered professional engineer with more than five years experience as a consultant in the electric power industry. Michael Kalichman leads NIH- and NSF-funded research on the goals, content, and methods for teaching research ethics. He has been invited to teach train-the-trainer, research ethics workshops throughout the United States and in Central America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. He is founding director of the UC San Diego Research Ethics Program (http://ethics.ucsd.edu) and the San Diego Research Ethics Consortium (http://sdrec.ucsd.edu), and cofounding director of the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology (http://ethicscenter.net). In 1999, with support from the Office of Research Integrity (ORI), he created one of the first online resources for the teaching of research ethics (http://research-ethics.net). Julia D. Kent (PhD) is director of global communications and best practices at the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS). Since arriving at CGS in 2008, she has conducted research on a broad range of topics in graduate education, including scholarly and research integrity, learning assessment, interdisciplinary graduate education, career outcomes for graduate students, professional doctorates, and international collaborations. She is co-principal investigator of a CGS initiative funded by the National Science Foundation, Modeling Effective Research Ethics Education in Graduate International Collaborations. CGS and partner universities will develop model approaches to assessing the learning of graduate students who participate in collaborations such as joint and dual degree programs and research collaborations and exchanges in STEM fields. Prior to this project she was program manager for the Project for Scholarly Integrity, funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services and ORI. This research and educational initiative has resulted in models for embedding the responsible conduct of research (RCR) into graduate education and has been disseminated widely in US graduate education through CGS broad network of member institutions. She is coauthor (with Daniel Denecke and Jeff Allum) of the resulting report, Research and Scholarly Integrity in Graduate Education: A Comprehensive Approach (2012). She also oversees CGS’s Strategic Leaders Global Summit, an annual global forum that has included graduate educational leaders from 29 countries since 2007. She is managing editor of CGS’s Global Perspectives series, the summit proceedings volumes, which includes Global Perspectives on Research Ethics and Scholarly Integrity (2009). She completed her graduate degrees at Université de Paris VII–Jussieu and at Johns Hopkins University. Before her arrival at CGS, she served on the faculty of the American University of Beirut (AUB). Ronald Kline is Bovay Professor in History and Ethics of Engineering at Cornell University, and director of the Bovay Program under that name in the Engineering College. He holds a joint appointment between the Science and Technology Studies Department in the College of Arts and 76  

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Sciences and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering at Cornell. Previously, he was director of the Center for the History of Electrical Engineering at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in New York City (1984–1987). He has served as president of the IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology, editor of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, and an advisory editor for Isis, Technology and Culture, and IEEE Spectrum. He is currently president of the Society for the History of Technology and an advisory editor for Social Studies of Science and Engineering Studies. He is the author of articles on the history of technology and engineering ethics, the books Steinmetz: Engineer and Socialist (1992) and Consumers in the Country: Technology and Social Change in Rural America (2000), and is completing a book on the history of cybernetics, information theory, and information discourse in the Cold War. Brian C. Martinson, PhD, is a senior research investigator and director for science programs at HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research (HPIER) in Minneapolis. As a principal investigator, over the past 10 years he has led several federally funded research projects studying research integrity as it relates to aspects of organizational climates in academic research settings. The most recent of these projects, completed in mid-2012 with results published in the Journal of Science and Engineering Ethics, was focused on the development and validation of the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC), an instrument for universities to use in assessing their own research integrity climates. In 2009–2010, he was a consultant to a three-university consortium participating in the CGS Project on Scholarly Integrity. During that time he also served on an invited expert panel on research integrity, convened by the Council of Canadian Academies at the request of Industry Canada, leading to the report Honesty, Accountability and Trust: Fostering Research Integrity in Canada. Martinson is a member of the US National Research Council panel charged with revising the 1992 publication Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process. 77