Click for next page ( 55


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 54
LEAD IN PAINT REFERENCES 1. Abraham, S., Lowenstein, F.W., and Johnson, C.L. Preliminary findings of the First Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 1971-1972: Dietary intake and biochemical findings. U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare. Health Resources Administration, Rockville, Md. DHEW Publication No. (HRA) 74-1219-1. Jan. 1974. 2. Adlard, B.P.F., Dobbing, J., and Smart, J.L. An alternative animal model for the full-term small-for-dates human baby. Biol. Neonate 23:95-108, 1973. 3. Albert, R.E., Shore, R.E., Sayers, A.J., Strehlow, C., £t al. Follow- up of children overexposed to lead. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:33-39, May 1974. 4. Alexander, F.W., Delves, H.T., and Clayton, B.E. The uptake and excretion by children of lead and other contaminants. IN: Environ- mental Health Aspects of Lead, Proc., International Symposium, Amsterdam, Oct. 2-6, 1972. Luxembourg, Commission of the European Communities. 1973. pp. 319-330. 5. Allen, J.R., McWey, P.J., and Suomi, S.J. Pathobiological and behavioral effects of lead intoxication in the infant rhesus monkey. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:239-246, May 1974. 6. Barltrop, D. Assessment of the health hazard of various lead compounds; Interim report. St. Mary's Hospital Medical School (St. MHM's). Contract No. HSM-99-73-28. Sept. 1974. 7. Barltrop, D., and Killala, N.J.P. Faecal excretion of lead by children. Lancet 2:1017-1019, 1967. 8. Barltrop, D., Strehlow, C.D., Thorton, I., and Webb, J.S. Significance of high soil lead concentrations for childhood lead burdens. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:75-82, May 1974. 9. Beattie, A.D., Moore, M.R., Goldberg, A., Finlayson, M.J.W., et al. Role of chronic low-level lead exposure in the aetiology of mental retardation. Lancet 1:589-592, 1975. 10. Benson, P.F., and Chisolm, J.J., Jr. A reliable qualitative urine coproporphyrin test for lead intoxication in young children. J. Pediat. 56:759-767, 1960. ll. Betts, P.R., Astley, R., and Raine, D.N. Lead intoxication in children in Birmingham. Brit. Med. J. 1:402-406, 1973. 54

OCR for page 54
12. Browder, A.A., Joselow, M.M., and Louria, D.B. The problem of lead poisoning. Med. (Baltimore) 52:121-139, 1973. 13. Brown, D.R. Neonatal lead exposure in the rat: Decreased learning as a function of age and blood lead concentrations. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 32:628-637, 1975. 14. Byers, R.K., and Lord, E.E. Late effects of lead poisoning on mental development. Am. J. Dis. Child. 66:471-494, 1943. 15. Carson, T.L., Van Gelder, G.A., Karas, G.C., and Buck, W.B. Slowed learning in lambs prenatally exposed to lead. Arch. Environ. Health 29:154-156, 1974. 16. Castles, T.R. Lead paint ingestion study. Midwest Research Institute (MRI). Contract No. 62-W-62GC and NPC. Feb. 1974. 17. Chisolm, J.J., Jr. Management of increased lead absorption and lead poisoning in children. New England J. Med. 289:1016-1018, 1973. 18. Chisolm, J.J., Jr. Screening for pediatric lead poisoning. Arh. Hig. Rada Toksikol. (Archives of Industrial Hygiene & Toxicology), Suppl. to vol. 26, 1976 (in press). 19. Chisolm, J.J., Jr., and Harrison, H.E. The exposure of children to lead. Pediatrics 18:943-958, 1956. 20. Chisolm, J.J., Jr., Barrett, M.B., and Mellits, E.D. Dose-effect and dose-response relationships for lead in children. J. Pediat. 87:ll52-ll60, 1975. 21. Cohen, G.J., and Ahrens, W.E. Chronic lead poisoining: A review of seven years' experience at the Children's Hospital, District of Columbia. J. Pediat. 54:271-284, 1959. 22. David, 0., Clark, J., and Voeller, K. Lead and hyperactivity. Lancet 2:900-903, 1972. 23. de la Burde, B., and Choate, M.S., Jr. Does asymptomatic lead exposure in children have latent sequelae? J. Pediat. 81:1088-109l, 1972. 24. de la Burde, B., and Choate, M.S. Early asymptomatic lead exposure and development at school age. J. Pediat. 87:638-642, 1975. 25. Dobbing, J. The later growth of the brain and its vulnerability. Pediatrics 53:2-6 Jan. 1974. 26. Dobbing, J. Undernutrition and the developing brain. The relevance of animal models to the human problem. Bibl. "Nutr. Diet.", No. 17:36-45, 1972. 55

OCR for page 54
27. Dobbing, J., and Sands, J. Quantitative growth and development of human brain. Arch. Dis. Child. 48:757-767, 1973. 28. Dresel, E.I.B., and Falk, J.E. Studies on the biosynthesis of blood pigments: 3. Haem and porph>rin formation from 6-aminolaevulic acid and from porphobilinogen in haemolysed chicken erythrocytes. Biochem. J. 63:80-87, 1956. 29. Emmerson, B.T. The clinical differentiation of lead gout from primary gout. Arthritis Rheum. ll:623-634, 1968. 30. Federation of Societies for Paint Technology. Federation series on coatings technology. Unit Eleven. Paint driers and additives, by William J. Stewart. Edited by Willard H. Madson. Philadelphia, ' June 1969. 31. Forbes, G.B., and Reina, J.C. Effect of age on gastrointestinal absorption (Fe, Sr, Pb) in the rat. J. Nutr. 102:647-652, 1972. 32. Gage, J.C., and Litchfield, M.H. The migration of lead from paint films in the rat gastro-intestinal tract. J. Oil Col. Chem. Assoc. 52:236-243, 1969. 33. Gage, J.C., and Litchfield, M.H. The migration of lead from polymers in the rat gastro-intestinal tract. Food Cosmet. Toxicol. 6:329-338, 1968. 34. Gilsinn, J.F. Estimates of the nature and extent of lead paint poisoning in the United States. U.S. Department of Commerce. National Bureau of Standards. Technical Note 746. Dec. 1972. 35. Golter, M., and Michaelson, I.A. Growth, behavior, and brain catecholamines in lead-exposed neonatal rats: A reappraisal. Science 187:359-36l, 1975. 36. Goyer, R.A., and Rhyne, B.C. Pathological effects of lead. Int. Rev. Exp. Pathol. 12:1-77, 1973. 37. Granick, J.L., Sassa, S., Granick, S., Levere, R.D., and Kappas, A. Studies in lead poisoning. II. Correlation between the ratio of activated to inactivated 6-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase of whole blood and the blood lead level. Biochem. Med. 8:149-159, 1973. 38. Hernberg, S., Nurminen, M., and Hasan, J. Nonrandom shortening of red cell survival times in men exposed to lead. Environ. Res. 1:247-26l, 1967. 39. Hertzig, M.E., Birch, H.G., Richardson, S.A., and Tizard, J. Intellec- tual levels of school children severely malnourished during the first two years of life. Pediatrics 49r814-824, 1972. 56

OCR for page 54
40. Joselow, M.M. , Banta, J.E., Fisher, W., and Valentine, J. Environmental contrasts: Blood lead levels of children in Honolulu and Newark. J. Environ. Health 37:10-12, 1974. 41. Kammholz, L.P., Thatcher, L.G., Blodgett, P.M., and Good, T.A. Rapid protoporphyrin quantitation for detection of lead poisoning. Pediatrics 50:625-63l, 1972. 42. Kehoe, R.A. The metabolism of lead in man in health and disease. The Harben Lectures, 1960. J. Royal Inst. Public Health and Hyg. 24:81-97, 129-143, 177-203, 1961. 43. Kello, D., and Kostial, K. The effect of milk diet on lead meta- bolism in rats. Environ. Res. 6:355-360, 1973. 44. Keppler, J.F., Maxfield, M.E., Moss, W.D., Tietjen, G., and Linch, A.L. Interlaboratory evaluation of the reliability of blood lead analyses. Am. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. J. 31:412-429, 1970. 45. King, B.C. Maximum daily intake of lead without excessive body lead- burden in children. Am. J. Dis. Child. 122:337-340, 1971. 46. King, E.G., and Schaplowsky, A.F. Basic factors in evaluation of hazard of childhood lead exposures. Presented at the annual Meeting of the American Public Health Assoc., New Orleans, La., Oct. 23, 1974. 47. Klauder, D.S., and Petering, H.G. Protective value of dietary copper and iron against some toxic effects of lead in rats. Environ. Health Perspect., 12:77-80, 1975. 48. Klein, P.S., Forbes, G.B., and Nader, P.R. Effects of starvation in infancy (pyloric stenosis) on subsequent learning abilities. J. Pediat. 87:8-15, 1975. 49. Kneip, T.J., Rulon, V.P., Pfitzer, E.A., Cohen, N., and Goldstein, D.H. Lead toxicity studies in infant baboons - A toxicological model for childhood lead poisoning. New York University, Institute of Environ- mental Medicine (NYU). Contract No. CPSC-C-74-153. Nov. 1974. 50. Kolbye, A.C., Jr., Mahaffey, K.R., Fiorino, J.A., Corneliussen, P.C., and Jelinek, C.F. Food exposures to lead. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:65-74, May 1974. 51. Kostial, K., Kello, D., Jugo, S., and Gruden, N. The effect of milk on toxic trace element absorption in rats. Presented before the XVIII International Congress on Occupational Health, Brighton, England Sept. 14-19, 1975. v >. „ „ 52. Kostial, K., Simonovic, I., and Pisonic, M. Lead absorption from the intestine in newborn rats. Nature 233:564, 1971. 57

OCR for page 54
53. Krigman, M.R., and Hogan, E.L. Effect of lead intoxication on the postnatal growth of the rat nervous system. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:187-199, May 1974. 54. Krigman, M.R., Druse, M.J., Traylor, T.D., Wilson, M.H., et al. Lead encephalopathy in the developing rat: Effect upon myelination. J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol. 33:58-73, 1974. 55. Lamola, A.A., and Yamane, T. Zinc protoporphyrin in the erythrocytes of patients with lead intoxication and iron deficiency anemia. Science 186:936-938, 1974. 56. Landrigan, P.J., Gehlbach, S.H., Rosenblum, B.F., Shoults, J.M., et al. Epidemic lead absorption near an ore smelter: The role of particulate lead. New England J. Med. 292:123-129, 1975. 57. Landrigan, P.J., Whitworth, R.H., Baloh, R.W., Staehling, N.W., et al. Neuropsychological dysfunction in children with chronic low-level lead absorption. Lancet 1:708-712, 1975. 58. Lansdown, R.G., Shepherd, J., Clayton, B.E., Delves, H.T., .et al. Blood- lead levels, behavior, and intelligence; A population study. Lancet 1:538-54l, 1974. 59. Lepow, M.L., Bruckman, L., Rubino, R.A., Markowitz, S., ^t al. Role of airborne lead in increased body burden of lead in Hartford children. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:99-102, May 1974. 60. Lin-Fu, J.S. Vulnerability of children to lead exposure and toxicity. New England J. Med. 289:1229-1233; 1289-1293, 1973. 61. Lourie, R.S., Layman, E.M., and Millican, F.K. Why children eat things that are not food. Children 10:143-146, 1963. 62. McNeil, J.L., and Ptasnik, J.A. Epidemiological study of a lead con- taminated area. Int. Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc., Grant LH-208, April 7, 1975. 63. Mahaffey, K.R. Nutritional factors and susceptibility to lead toxicity. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:107-112, May 1974. 64. Mahaffey, K.R., Goyer, R., and Haseman, J.K. Dose-response to lead ingestion in rats fed low dietary calcium. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 82:92-100, 1973. 65. Michaelson, I.A., and Sauerhoff, M.W. Animal models of human disease: Severe and mild lead encephalopathy in the neonatal rat. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:201-225, May 1974. 58

OCR for page 54
66. Michaelson, I.A., and Sauerhoff, M.W. An improved model of lead- induced brain dysfunction in the suckling rat. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 28:88-96, 1974. 67. Mitchell, D.G., and Aldous, K.M. Lead content of foodstuffs. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:59-64, May 1974. 68. Momcilovic, B., and Kostial, K. Kinetics of lead retention and distribution in suckling and adult rats. Environ. Res. 8:214-220, 1974. 69. National Academy of Sciences. Report of the ad hoc committee to evaluate the hazard of lead in paint. Prepared for the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Washington, D.C. Nov. 1973. 70. National Academy of Sciences. Committee on Biologic Effects of Atmospheric Pollutants. Lead: Airborne lead in perspective. Washington, D.C. 1972. 71. Nordberg, G.F. Effects and Dose-Response Relationships of Toxic Metals. New York, Elsevier. 1976. 559 p. 72. Pentschew, A., and Garro, F. Lead encephalo-myelopathy of the suckling rat and its implications on the porphyrinopathic nervous diseases; With special reference to the permeability disorders of the nervous system's capillaries. Acta Neuropathol. 6:266-278, 1966. 73. Perino, J., and Ernhart, C.B. The relation of subclinical lead level to cognitive and sensorimotor impairment in black preschoolers. J. Learn. Disabil. 7:616-620, 1974. 74. Perlstein, M.A., and Attala, R. Neurologic sequelae of plumbism in children. Clin. Pediatr. 5:292-298, 1966. 75. Piomelli, S., Young, P., and Gay, G. A micromethod for free erythrocyte porphyrins: The FEP test. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 81:932-940, 1973. 76. Portman, O.W., Alexander, M., and Illingworth, D.R. Changes in brain and sciatic nerve composition with development of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Brain Res. 43:197-213, 1972. 77. Portman, O.W., Neuringer, M., Illingworth, D.R., and Alexander, M. Developmental changes in the brain of the rhesus monkey: The role of diet. Primate News 10:4-9, March 1972. 78. Pueschel, S.M., Kopito, L., and Schwachman, H. Children with an increased lead burden: A screening and follow-up study. J. Am. Med. Assoc. 222:462-466, 1972. 79. Purdy, R.H. A toxicological investigation of chronic lead paint ingestion in the juvenile baboon. Southwest Foundation for Research and Education (SWFRE). Contract No. CPSC-C-74-159. Nov. 1974. 59

OCR for page 54
80. Rabinowitz, M.B., Wetherill, G.W., and Kopple, J.D. Lead metabolism in the normal human: Stable isotope studies. Science 182:725-727, 1973. 81. Roels, H.A., Lauwerys, R.R., Buchet, J.P., and Vrelust, M.-Th. Response of free erythrocyte porphyrin and urinary fi-aminolevulinic acid in men and women moderately exposed to lead. Int. Arch. Arbeitsmed. 34:97-108, 1975. 82. Rosen, J.F., and Trinidad, E.E. Significance of plasma lead levels in normal and lead-intoxicated children. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:139-144, May 1974. 83. Rosenblum, W.I., and Johnson, M.G. Neuropathologic changes produced in suckling mice by adding lead to the maternal diet. Arch..Pathol. 85:640-648, 1968. 84. Sachs, H.K., Blanksma, L.A., Murray, E.F., and O'Connell, M.J. Ambulatory treatment of lead poisoning: Report of 1,155 cases. Pediatrics 46:389-396, 1970. 85. Sachs, H.K. Letter to Dr. J. Julian Chisolm,Jr. dated Oct. 18, 1975. 86. Sakurai, H., Sugita, M., and Tsuchiya, K. Biological response and subjective symptoms in low level lead exposure. Arch. Envrion. Health 29:157-163, 1974. 87. Sassa, S., Granick, J.L., Granick, S., Kappas, A., and Levere, R.D. Studies in lead poisoning. I. Microanalysis of erythrocyte proto- porphyrin levels by spectrofluorometry in the detection of chronic lead intoxication in the subclinical range. Biochem. Med. 8:135-148, 1973. 88. Sayre, J.W., Charney, E., Vostal, J., and Pless, I.E. House and hand dust as a potential source of childhood lead exposure. Am. J. Dis. Child. 127:167-170, 1974. 89. Selander, S., and Cramer, K. Interrelationships between lead in blood, lead in urine, and ALA in urine during lead work. Brit. J. Ind. Med. 27:28-39, 1970. 90. Silbergeld, E.K., and Goldberg, A.M. Hyperactivity: A lead-induced behavior disorder. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:227-232, May 1974. 91. Silbergeld, E.K., and Goldberg, A.M. Pharmacological and neurochemical investigations of lead-induced hyperactivity. Neuropharmacol. 14:431-444, 1975. 92. Six, K.M., and Goyer, R.A. The influence of iron deficiency on tissue content and toxicity of ingested lead in the rat. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 79:128-136, 1972. 60

OCR for page 54
93. Smith, N.J., Rosello, S., Say, M.B., and Yeya, K. Iron storage in the first five years of life. Pediatrics 16:166-173, 1955. 94. Sobel, R. The psychiatric implications of accidental poisoning in childhood. Pediatr. Clin. North Am. 17:653-685, 1970. 95. Sobotka, T.J., and Cook, M.P. Postnatal lead acetate exposure in rats: Possible relationship to minimal brain dysfunction. Am. J. Ment. Defic. 79:5-9, 1974. 96. Specter, M.J., Guinee, V.F., and Davidow, B. The unsuitability of random urinary delta aminolevulinic acid samples as a screening test for lead poisoning. J. Pediat. 79:799-804, 1971. 97. Stuik, E.J. Biological response of male and female volunteers to inorganic lead. Int. Arch. Arbeitsmed. 33:83-97, 1974. 98. Ten-State Nutrition Survey, 1968-1970. V. Dietary. U.S. Dept. Health, Education, and Welfare. HSMHA, Center for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga. DHEW Publ. No. (HSM) 72-8133. tl972] 99. Ter Haar, G., and Aronow, R. New information on lead in dirt and dust as related to the childhood lead problem. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:83-89, May 1974. 100. Tola, S., Hernberg, S., Asp, S., and Nikkanen, J. Parameters indicative of absorption and biological effect in new lead exposure: A prospective study. Brit. J. Ind. Med. 30:134-14l, 1973. 101. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. A report to Congress in compliance with the Lead Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act, as amended (PL 93-151). Dec. 23, 1974. 102. Vostal, J.J. , Taves, E., Sayre, J.W., and Charney, E. Lead analysis of house dust: A method for the detection of another source of lead exposure in inner city children. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:91-97, May 1974. 103. World Health Organization. Evaluation of certain food additives and the contaminants mercury, lead, and cadmium. WHO Tech. Rept. Series No. 505. Geneva, 1972. 104. Zielhuis, R.L. [Basic information on (internal) dose-response relation- ship for inorganic lead.] Report to the Director, Health Protection, European Economic Communities. tl974l 105. Zielhuis, R.L. Dose-response relationships for inorganic lead. I. Biochemical and haematological responses. Int. Arch. Occup. Health 35:1-18, 1975. 61

OCR for page 54
106. Zielhuis, R.L. Dose-response relationships for inorganic lead. II. Subjective and functional responses - chronic sequelae - no- response levels. Int. Arch. Occup. Health 35:19-35, 1975. 62

OCR for page 54
LEAD IN PAINT Additional References Angle, C.R., Mclntire, M.S., and Colucci, A.V. Lead in air, dustfall, soil, housedust, milk and water: Correlation with blood lead of urban and suburban school children. IN Hemphill, D.D., ed. Trace Substances in Environmental Health-VIII. Columbia, Missouri, U. of Mo. 1974. p. 23-29. Earth, D., Berlin, A., Engel, R., Recht, P., and Smeets, J., Editorial Committee. Environmental Health Aspects of Lead. An International Symposium organized jointly by the Commission of the European Communities and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Amsterdam, Oct. 2-6, 1972. Luxembourg, Commission of the European Communities. 1973. ll68 p. Cohen, C.J. , Bowers, G.N., and Lepow, M.L. Epidemiology of lead poisoning; a comparison between urban and rural children. Am. Med. Assoc. J. 226:1430-1433, 1973. Cohen, N., Kneip, T.J., Rulon, V., and Goldstein, D.H. Biochemical and toxicological response of infant baboons to lead driers in paint. Environ. Health Perspect., Exptl. Issue No. 7:161-173, May 1974. Farkas, W.R., Hewins, S., and Welch, J.W. Effects of plumbous ion on some functions of transfer RNA. Chem.-Biol. Interact. 5:191-200, 1972. Gainer, J.H. Activation of the Rauscher leukemia virus by metals. J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 51:609-613, 1973. Goyer, R.A., and Chisolm, J.J. Chapter 3. Lead. JN Lee, Douglas, H.K., ed. Metallic Contaminants and Human Health. New York, Academic. 1972. p. 57-95. Greenberg, M., Jacobziner, H., McLaughlin, M.C., Fuerst, H.T., and Pellitteri, 0. A study of pica in relation to/lead poisoning. Pediatrics 22:756-760, 1958. Hammond, P.B. Lead poisoning. An old problem with a new dimension. IN Blood, F.R., ed. Essays in Toxicology, Vol. I. New York, Academic. 1969. p. ll5-155. Hammond, P.B. Metabolism and metabolic action of lead and other heavy metals. Clin. Toxicol. 6:353-365, 1973. Hardy, H.L. What is the status of knowledge of the toxic effect of lead on identifiable groups in the population? Clin. Pharmacol. Ther. 7:713- 722, 1966. 63

OCR for page 54
Huth, P.J. Lead content in human hair from pre-industrial societies. A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biological Sciences, Michigan Techno- logical University. International Lead Zinc Research Organization. Grant LH-2ll. 1974. Jackson, K.E., Mirick, W., and Beck, P.R. Impact study of lead in paint. Battelle Columbus Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio. Contract No. CPSC-C-74-195. Sept. 6, 1974. Kehoe, R.A., Goldsmith, J.R., and Hexter, A.C. Lead intake from food and from the atmosphere. Science 159:1000, 1968. Lessler, M.A. Effect of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the lead uptake of erythrocytes. Final report, Phase I. International Lead Zinc Research Organization. Contract LH-200. July 1974. Lessler, M.A. Effect of lead on reticulocyte and mitochondrial activity. Final report. International Lead Zinc Research Organization. Project LH-159. June 1971. Lichtman, H.C., and Feldman, F. In vitro pyrrole and porphyrin synthesis in lead poisoning and iron deficiency. J. Clin. Invest. 42:830-839, 1963. Lin-Fu, J.S. Undue absorption of lead among children — a new look at an old problem. New England J. Med. 286:702-710, 1972. Lipetz, J., and Douglass, O.B., Jr. The relation of soluble lead to toxicity: An in vitro analysis. Chem.-Biol. Interact. 11:ll7-122, 1975. Mellins, R.B., and Jenkins, C.D. Epidemiological and psychological study of lead poisoning in children. J. Am. Med. Assoc., 158:15-20, 1955. Needleman, H.L., Davidson, I., Sewell, E.M., and Shapiro, I.M. Subclinical lead exposure in Philadelphia schoolchildren; Identification by dentine lead analysis. New England J. Med. 290:245-248, 1974. Schucker, G.W., Vail, E.H., Kelley, E.B., and Kaplan, E. Prevention of lead paint poisoning among Baltimroe children. Public Health Reports 80:969-974, 1965. Schwarz, K. The role of lead as an essential trace element in nutrition. International Lead Zinc Research Organization. Grant LH-189. May 30, 1973. Shakman, R.A. Nutritional influences on the toxicity of environmental pollutants; A review. Arch. Environ. Health 28:105-ll3, 1974. Silbergeld, E.K., and Goldberg, A.M. Lead-induced behavioral dysfunction: An animal model of hyperactivity. Expermmental Neurol. 42:146-157, 1974. 64

OCR for page 54
Simpson, J.M., Clark, J.L., Challop, R.S., and McCabe, E.B. Elevated blood lead levels in children—A 27-city neighborhood survey. Health Services Reports 88:419-422, 1973. Stowe, H.D., Goyer, R.A., Krigman, M.M., Wilson, M., and Gates, M. Experimental oral lead toxicity in young dogs; Clinical and morpho- logic effects. Arch. Pathol. 95:106-ll6, 1973. Tsuchiya, K., Sugita, M., Seki, Y., Kobayashi, Y., et al. Study of lead concentrations in atmosphere and population in Japan. International Lead Zinc Research Organization. Contract LH-185. Feb. 1974. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA's position on the health im- plications of airborne lead. Washington, D.C. Nov. 28, 1973. Vallee, B.L., and Ulmer, D.D. Biochemical effects of mercury, cadmium, and lead. Ann. Rev. Biochem. 41:91-128, 1972. Waldron, H.A., and Stofen, D. Sub-Clinical Lead Poisoning. New York, Academic. 1974. 224 p. Watson, R.J., Decker, E., and Lichtman, H.C. Hematologic studies of children with lead poisoning. Pediatrics 21:40-46, 1958. Wiener, G. Varying psychological sequelae of lead ingestion in children. Public Health Reports 85:19-24, 1970. World Health Organization. WHO Environmental Health Criteria Programme. Environmental health criteria for lead. EHE/EHC/WP/74.10. Geneva. 1974. DRAFT. 65

OCR for page 54

OCR for page 54