Appendix B

Speaker Biographical Sketches

HENRY CLAYPOOL has 25 years of experience developing and implementing disability policy at the federal, state, and local level and also has personal experience with the nation’s health system as a person with a disability. Mr. Claypool sustained a spinal injury more than 30 years ago. In the years following his injury he relied on Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability Insurance, and Supplemental Security Income, which enabled him to complete his complete his bachelor’s degree at the University of Colorado. In his most recent role in public service as a senior advisor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Claypool was a principal architect of the administration’s efforts to expanding access to community living services, which culminated in the creation of the Administration for Community Living where he served as the principal deputy administrator. From 2005 to 2006 he served as a senior advisor in the Social Security Administration’s Office of Employment Support Programs. From 1998 to 2002 he held various advisory positions at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including senior advisor for disability policy to the Administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. He is now the executive vice president of the American Association of People with Disabilities. In these roles he relies on his unique background of public service and personal experience to seek pragmatic policy solutions.

JUDITH FEDER, Ph.D., is a professor of public policy at Georgetown University and from 1999 to 2008 served as dean of the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. A nationally recognized leader in health policy, Dr. Feder



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Appendix B Speaker Biographical Sketches HENRY CLAYPOOL has 25 years of experience developing and imple- menting disability policy at the federal, state, and local level and also has personal experience with the nation’s health system as a person with a disability. Mr. Claypool sustained a spinal injury more than 30 years ago. In the years following his injury he relied on Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security Disability Insurance, and Supplemental Security Income, which enabled him to complete his complete his bachelor’s degree at the University of Colorado. In his most recent role in public service as a senior advisor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Claypool was a principal architect of the administration’s efforts to expanding access to community living services, which culminated in the creation of the Administration for Community Living where he served as the principal deputy administrator. From 2005 to 2006 he served as a senior advisor in the Social Security Administration’s Office of Employment Support Programs. From 1998 to 2002 he held various advisory positions at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, including senior advisor for disability policy to the Administrator of the Health Care Financing Administration at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. He is now the executive vice president of the American Association of People with Disabilities. In these roles he relies on his unique background of public service and personal experience to seek pragmatic policy solutions. JUDITH FEDER, Ph.D., is a professor of public policy at Georgetown University and from 1999 to 2008 served as dean of the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. A nationally recognized leader in health policy, Dr. Feder 63

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64 FINANCING LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS has made her mark on the nation’s health insurance system through both scholarship and public service. A widely published scholar, her health policy research began at the Brookings Institution, continued at the Urban Insti- tute, and, since 1984, has flourished at Georgetown University. In the late 1980s, she moved from policy research to policy leadership, actively pro- moting effective health reform as staff director of the congressional Pepper Commission (chaired by Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV) in 1989–1990; as principal deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in former President Bill Clinton’s first term; as a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (2008–2011); and, today, as an institute fellow at the Urban Institute. Dr. Feder matches her own contributions to policy with her contribu- tions to nurturing emerging policy leaders. As dean from 1999 to 2008, she built the Georgetown Public Policy Institute into one of the nation’s leading public policy schools, whose graduates participate in policy making, policy research, and policy politics not only throughout Washington, but throughout the nation and the world. Dr. Feder is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, the Na- tional Academy of Public Administration, and the National Academy of Social Insurance; a former chair and board member of AcademyHealth; a member of the Center for American Progress Action Fund Board, the Board of the National Academy of Social Insurance, and the Hamilton Project’s Advisory Council; and a senior advisor to the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. In 2006 and 2008, she was the Democratic nominee for Congress in Virginia’s 10th congressional district. Dr. Feder is a political scientist with a B.A. from Brandeis University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard University. RICHARD G. FRANK, Ph.D., is the Margaret T. Morris Professor of Health Economics in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. From 2009 to 2011 he served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, directing the office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy. His research is focused on the economics of mental health and substance abuse care, long-term care financing policy, and disability policy. He is also a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, and he serves as an editor for the Journal of Health Economics. Dr. Frank was awarded the Georgescu-Roegen prize from the Southern Economic Association, the Carl A. Taube Award from the American Public Health Association, and the Emily Mumford Medal from Columbia Uni- versity’s Department of Psychiatry. In 2011 he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Mental Health Association of Maryland. Dr. Frank received the John Eisberg Mentorship Award from National Research Ser-

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APPENDIX B 65 vice Awards. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1997. He is co- author with Sherry Glied of the book Better But Not Well (Johns Hopkins Press, 2006). LEE GOLDBERG, J.D., M.A., is vice president for health policy at the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) and serves as study director of the Health Insurance Exchanges Study Panel. Prior to joining NASI in September 2010, Mr. Goldberg managed long-term care policy initiatives for the Service Employees International Union, which represents more than one-half million nursing home and home care workers. Previously, he served as a senior legislative representative and communications rep- resentative for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and as assistant director for health policy for United Jewish Com- munities. In addition to his advocacy work, he has experience working on Capitol Hill for Sen. Don Riegle and Rep. Fortney H. (Pete) Stark and as a journalist working for Inside Washington Publications. A NASI member since 2006, Mr. Goldberg received his M.A. in international economics and international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and his J.D. from the George Washington University. G. WILLIAM HOAGLAND, M.S., is a senior vice president at the Bi- partisan Policy Center (BPC). Hoagland completed 33 years of federal government service, 25 spent as staff in the U.S. Senate. In 2007 CIGNA Corporation appointed him as vice president of public policy to work with CIGNA business leaders, trade associations, business coalitions, and inter- est groups to develop CIGNA policy particularly on health care reform issues at both the federal and state levels. Hoagland is an affiliate professor of public policy at George Mason University, a board member of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, and a member of the National Campaign’s Public Policy Advisory Group focusing on teen pregnancy and unwanted pregnancy, the National Academy of Social Insurance, and the National Advisory Committee to the Workplace Flexibility 2010 Commission. In 2009 he was appointed to the Peterson-Pew Commission on Budget Reform examining the overall structure of the budget, authorization, and appropriations process and was a member of BPC’s Debt Reduction Task Force, which published Restor- ing America’s Future in November 2010. Born in Covington, Indiana, he attended the U.S. Maritime Academy and holds degrees from Purdue Uni- versity (B.S.) and Pennsylvania State University (M.S.). GAIL HUNT is president and chief executive officer of the National Alli- ance for Caregiving (NAC), a nonprofit coalition dedicated to conducting research and developing national programs for family caregivers and the

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66 FINANCING LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS professionals who serve them. Prior to heading NAC, Ms. Hunt was presi- dent of her own aging services consulting firm for 14 years. She conducted corporate elder care research for the National Institute on Aging and the Social Security Administration, developed training for caregivers with AARP and the American Occupational Therapy Association, and designed a corporate elder care program for employee assistance professionals with the Employee Assistance Professional Association. Prior to having her own firm, she was senior manager in charge of human services for the Washing- ton, DC, office of KPMG Peat Marwick. Ms. Hunt attended Vassar Col- lege and graduated from Columbia University in New York. She served on the Policy Committee for the 2005 White House Conference on Aging as well as on the Advisory Panel on Medicare Education. She is chair of the National Center on Senior Transportation. Ms. Hunt is also on the Board of Commissioners for the Center for Aging Service Technology and on the Board for Long-Term Care Quality Assurance. Additionally, Ms. Hunt is on the governing board of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. LISA I. IEzzONI, M.D., M.S., has spent more than two decades conduct- ing health services research focusing on three primary areas: risk adjust- ment methods for predicting cost and clinical outcomes of care, the use of administrative data for assessing health care quality, and health care experiences and outcomes of persons with disabilities. After spending 16 years as co-director of research in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Dr. Iezzoni joined the Mongan Institute for Health Policy (MIHP) as associate director in 2006. She is currently serving as director of MIHP. Dr. Iezzoni has led numerous research grants with funding from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the National Institutes of Health, and the Health Care Financing Administration as well as from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and other private foundations. An internationally recognized expert in risk adjustment, she has edited Risk Adjustment for Measuring Health Care Outcomes, now in its third edition. Dr. Iezzoni began her disability research with a 1996 Investigator Award in Health Policy Research from RWJF, and the book summarizing this work, When Walking Fails: Mobility Impairments of Adults with Chronic Conditions, appeared in 2003. Another book considering disability expe- riences more broadly, More Than Ramps: A Guide to Improving Health Care Quality and Access for People with Disabilities (co-authored with Bonnie L. O’Day), was published in 2006. Dr. Iezzoni has also published numerous original articles, editorials, and commentaries in major medical and health services research journals. Dr. Iezzoni speaks widely, and she has served on numerous commit- tees and advisory boards of professional and governmental organizations,

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APPENDIX B 67 including the National Institutes of Health, the Institute of Medicine, the National Quality Forum, and the RWJF Clinical Scholars Program. For the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services she served on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (1994–2001) and the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objec- tives for 2020 (2008–2009). She has served on the editorial boards of the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Health Affairs, Medical Care, Health Services Research, and the Disability and Health Journal, among others. In 2000 Dr. Iezzoni was elected to the Institute of Medicine in the National Academy of Sciences. RICHARD W. JOHNSON, Ph.D., is senior fellow and director of the Pro- gram on Retirement Policy in the Income and Benefits Policy Center with the Urban Institute. He is an expert on income and health security at older ages. Much of his research focuses on older Americans’ employment and retirement decisions. Recent studies have examined job loss at older ages, occupational change after age 50, employment prospects for 50-plus Afri- can Americans and Hispanics, and the impact of the 2007–2009 recession and its aftermath on older workers and future retirement incomes. He has also written extensively about retirement preparedness, including the fi- nancial and health risks people face as they approach retirement, economic hardship in the years before Social Security’s early eligibility age, and the adequacy of the disability safety net. Dr. Johnson’s other research interest’s center on medical and long-term care costs at older ages. He has testified before Congress about the family costs of elder care and about gaps in health insurance coverage among older adults who have not yet qualified for Medicare. Current projects include studies that forecast the future demand for home care and nursing home care and future out-of-pocket spending on medical care. Dr. Johnson holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. MARYBETH MUSUMECI, J.D., is an associate director at the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured at the Henry J. Kaiser Fam- ily Foundation, where she concentrates on Medicaid for people with dis- abilities, including issues related to people dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and long-term services and supports. Prior to joining the commission staff, she held a Reuschlein Clinical Teaching Fellowship at Villanova University School of Law and spent 8 years as a civil legal aid lawyer, most recently as the deputy legal advocacy director of the Disabili- ties Law Program at Community Legal Aid Society, Inc., in Wilmington, Delaware, where her practice focused on Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, other public benefits programs, and civil rights and accessibility issues. Previously she developed and taught a seminar in public benefits

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68 FINANCING LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS law at Widener University School of Law, clerked in the Delaware Family Court, and held an Independence Foundation Public Interest Law Fellow- ship representing women transitioning from welfare to work in Chester, Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. with highest honors from Douglass College at Rutgers University and her J.D. from Harvard Law School. JOHN O’LEARY, M.B.A., is a marketing expert known for developing in- novative and customer-driven products and marketing programs that have led to market success. Highlights of his career include senior positions at Genworth Financial, CNA Financial, and John Hancock. At Genworth, Mr. O’Leary led the product development and market- ing effort for the company’s successful expansion into the group long-term care market segment. He revamped its consumer marketing campaign us- ing segmentation and research to improve messaging and message delivery. He planned, developed, and implemented successful enrollment campaigns that achieved success rates more than double those of prior campaigns and awareness levels of more than 90 percent. At John Hancock, Mr. O’Leary became an industry leader and spokes- person by pioneering the use of the Internet to market long-term care insur- ance. He worked with then Congressman Joe Scarborough’s office to help successfully develop and pass legislation to provide voluntary long-term care insurance to federal workers. He also drove a public relations cam- paign with the National Council on the Aging that generated exposure in the Wall Street Journal and on Good Morning America, the Today Show, and CNN. Mr. O’Leary’s career began with consumer brand management posi- tions at Procter and Gamble and Parker Brothers. He followed that with positions as vice president of marketing for Infocom and vice president of marketing and sales for Whistler Corporation. In those positions Mr. O’Leary was responsible for the development, marketing, and roll out of more than 100 new product introductions. He managed marketing and sales goals and budgets, directed internal marketing and external sales orga- nizations, managed advertising and public relations agencies, and developed expertise in product and brand marketing, market research, advertising, promotion and event marketing. A strong element of his success is applying customer insights to product development and marketing innovations. Mr. O’Leary has successfully positioned products and businesses for growth and managed virtually all aspects of the marketing toolkit. Mr. O’Leary’s education includes an M.B.A. from the Harvard Busi- ness School (HBS) and a B.A. from Northeastern University. He is active with the Massachusetts Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, is chair of the marketing track for the 2013 and 2014 Intercompany Long Term

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APPENDIX B 69 Care Insurance conference, and is a member of the HBS Alumni of Boston Consulting Group and the HBS Health Special Interest Group. LAURIE M. ORLOV, is the founder of Aging in Place Technology Watch, a market research firm that provides thought leadership, analysis, and guid- ance about technologies and related services that enable baby boomers and seniors to remain longer in their home of choice. In her previous career Ms. Orlov spent more than 30 years in the tech- nology industry, including 24 years in information technology and 9 years as a leading industry analyst at Forrester Research. While there she was often the first in the industry to identify technology trends and management strategies that have survived the test of time. She has spoken regularly and delivered keynote speeches at forums, industry consortia, conferences, and symposia, most recently on the business of technology for baby boom- ers and seniors. She has been featured on Caring.com, MatureMarkets, SilverPlanet, and Mobile Health News, and her blog entries are widely syndicated. She advises large organizations as well as nonprofits and en- trepreneurs about trends and opportunities in the age-related technology market. Her segmentation of this emerging technology market and trends commentary has been presented in the Journal of Geriatric Care Man- agement and the American Society on Aging’s Aging Today Online. Her perspectives have been quoted in Business Week, Forbes, Kiplinger, the Toronto Star, and the New York Times. She has been profiled in the New York Times and the Huffington Post. She has a graduate certification in geriatric care management from the University of Florida and a B.A. in music from the University of Rochester. She has consulted for AARP and is a participating expert on the Think Tank for the Philips Center for Health and Well-Being. Clients have included AARP, Microsoft, Novartis, Johnson & Johnson, United HealthCare, and Philips. ERICA L. REAVES, M.P.P., is a policy analyst with the Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured (KCMU) of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, where she focuses on long-term care policy. Just prior to join- ing KCMU in August 2012, Ms. Reaves was a program analyst at United Way of Central Maryland, responsible for data analysis and research sup- port for the impact strategies and development divisions. She spent more than 3 years at the Hilltop Institute at the University of Maryland, Balti- more County, providing research and analytical support on state health reform, Medicaid home- and community-based waivers, and long-term care system transformation. Ms. Reaves holds a bachelor’s degree in biologi- cal sciences and a master’s degree in public policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

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70 FINANCING LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS DAVID C. STAPLETON, Ph.D., is a senior fellow who directs Math- ematica’s Center for Studying Disability Policy. He is also the director of Mathematica’s 5-year cooperative agreement with the Social Security Administration (SSA) for the agency’s Disability Research Consortium and area leader for research sponsored by SSA, the Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, and nongovern- mental disability organizations. Since 1991 his research has focused on the impacts of public policy on the employment and income of people with disabilities. Mr. Stapleton, who joined Mathematica in 2007, is a principal in- vestigator for the Department of Health and Human Services Center of Excellence for Comparative Effectiveness Research on Disability Services, Coordinated Care and Integration; SSA’s Benefit Offset National Demon- stration; SSA’s Ticket to Work Evaluation; the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on Disability Statistics and Demographics; and the Individual Characteristics RRTC. He is also a senior advisor to the RRTC on employment policy and measurement; the SSA’s National Beneficiary Survey; and SSA’s Disability Analysis File. ROBYN I. STONE, Ph.D., is the executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research and senior vice president of research. A noted researcher and leading international authority on aging and long-term care policy, she joined LeadingAge to establish and oversee the LeadingAge Center for Applied Research. Dr. Stone came to LeadingAge from the International Longevity Center- USA in New York City, where she was executive director and chief operat- ing officer. Previously she worked for the federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now known as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). Dr. Stone also served the White House as deputy assistant secretary for disability, aging, and long-term care policy and as acting assistant secretary for aging in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under the Clinton administration. She was a senior researcher at the National Center for Health Services as well as at Project Hope’s Center for Health Affairs. Stone was on the staff of the 1989 Bipartisan Commission on Compre- hensive Health Care and the 1993 Clinton administration’s Task Force on Health Care Reform. Dr. Stone holds a doctorate in public health from the University of California, Berkeley. JACK VANDERHEI, Ph.D., is the research director of the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization committed to original public policy research and education on economic security and employee benefits. He is also the director of both the EBRI

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APPENDIX B 71 Defined Contribution and Participant Behavior Research Program and the EBRI Retirement Security Research Program, and he is the co-director of the EBRI Center for Research on Retirement Income. He has been with EBRI since 1988. Dr. VanDerhei has more than 150 publications devoted to employee benefits and insurance, but his major areas of research focus are the finan- cial aspects of private defined benefit and defined contribution retirement plans. He is currently analyzing a database with annual observations since 1996 of more than 23 million 401(k) participants from more than 60,000 plans. He has also constructed a simulation model to forecast future retire- ment income for birth cohorts between 1935 and 1975. This model has already been used to help individual states predict the percentage of retirees (by age, gender, and family status) that will have inadequate income to provide for specific post-retirement purchases (such as housing and health care expenditures). He has also used the model to forecast the probable financial impact of modifying the existing system with respect to company stock in 401(k) plans. He is the editor of Benefits Quarterly and Search for a National Re- tirement Income Policy (University of Pennsylvania Press), a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, a member of the Board of Out- side Scholars for the University of Michigan Retirement Research Center, a member of the BNA Pension and Benefit Publications Advisory Board and on the advisory board of the Pension Research Council at the Wharton School. He was a co-author of the sixth, seventh, and eighth editions of Pension Planning: Pension, Profit-Sharing, and Other Deferred Compensa- tion Plans (Irwin/McGraw-Hill). He has made numerous presentations on retirement security topics for academic as well as national professional conferences and is often called upon to provide briefings for Capitol Hill staffers and research staff for federal agencies. He has also served on or consulted for a number of working groups involved in overseeing the development of pension simu- lation models. He received his B.B.A. and M.B.A. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. JOSHUA M. WIENER, Ph.D., is a distinguished fellow and program di- rector for aging, disability, and long-term care at RTI International. He is the author or editor of 8 books and more than 200 journal articles, reports, and monographs on health care for older people, people with disabilities, quality assurance, residential care facilities, long-term services and supports, international health care systems, Medicaid, health reform, health care rationing, and maternal and child health. Dr. Wiener directed

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72 FINANCING LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS the development of the Brookings–ICF Long-Term Care Financing Model, the first comprehensive microsimulation model for long-term care in the United States. He is co-director of the Administration on Aging–funded Alzheimer’s Disease Supportive Services Program National Resource Cen- ter. Dr. Wiener is currently involved in studies of quality in residential care facilities, long-term care insurance, home-based primary care, risk of insti- tutionalization, and Medicaid spend down. Prior to coming to RTI Interna- tional, Dr. Wiener did policy analysis and research for the Urban Institute, the Brookings Institution, the Health Care Financing Administration, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, the Congressional Budget Office, the New York State Moreland Act Commission on Nursing Homes and Residential Facilities, and the New York City Department of Health.