Authors

VIVIEN GORE ALLEN is associate professor of agronomy at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Her research areas include forage management and forage systems with emphasis on soil-plant-animal interrelationships and use of high-forage diets in ruminant and equine nutrition. She earned a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from Louisiana State University.

VERNON L. ANDERSON Since 1979 Anderson has been the animal scientist at the North Dakota State University Carrington Research Extension Center located near Carrington. His research includes drylot beef cow/calf management with a special emphasis on ruminant animal and crop production that is both integrated and complementary. He earned his M.S. degree in animal science from South Dakota State University.

CHARLES M. BENBROOK is president of Benbrook Consulting Services, Dickerson, Maryland. From 1984 to 1990, he was executive director of the Board on Agriculture at the National Academy of Sciences. Since 1979, he has worked in Washington, D.C., on agricultural science, technology, food safety, and policy issues. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

DAV A. BENDER is associate professor of horticulture at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. His research interest is the culture and physiology of vegetables. He has a Ph.D. degree in horticulture from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.



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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS Authors VIVIEN GORE ALLEN is associate professor of agronomy at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Her research areas include forage management and forage systems with emphasis on soil-plant-animal interrelationships and use of high-forage diets in ruminant and equine nutrition. She earned a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from Louisiana State University. VERNON L. ANDERSON Since 1979 Anderson has been the animal scientist at the North Dakota State University Carrington Research Extension Center located near Carrington. His research includes drylot beef cow/calf management with a special emphasis on ruminant animal and crop production that is both integrated and complementary. He earned his M.S. degree in animal science from South Dakota State University. CHARLES M. BENBROOK is president of Benbrook Consulting Services, Dickerson, Maryland. From 1984 to 1990, he was executive director of the Board on Agriculture at the National Academy of Sciences. Since 1979, he has worked in Washington, D.C., on agricultural science, technology, food safety, and policy issues. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. DAV A. BENDER is associate professor of horticulture at the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. His research interest is the culture and physiology of vegetables. He has a Ph.D. degree in horticulture from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS MARK BÖHLKE From 1987 to 1990, Böhlke was a research technician at Rodale Research Center. He plans to enter a graduate program in pharmacognosy to study active compounds obtained from medicinal plants. He earned an M.S. degree in biology from the University of Michigan. TIMOTHY BOWSER is a senior research technologist in the Department of Entomology at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). He earned an M.S. degree in rural sociology from PSU and has research interests in social impact assessment, technology transfer, and sustainable agriculture. MIKE BRUORTON joined the University of Georgia Extension Service in July 1987 where he worked as county extension agent until July 1991. He is currently county extension director of Clinch County, Homerville, Georgia. He has a B.S. degree in agronomy from Clemson University. PATRICK M. CARR is research associate at the Carrington Research Center in North Dakota. He has a Ph.D. degree in crop and plant science from Montana State University. His areas of research include multiple cropping and novel crop development. RAYMOND I. CARRUTHERS Since 1985 Carruthers has been a research ecologist/entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture at Cornell University, where he serves as a lead scientist. His research addresses the use of parasites, pathogens, and predators as biological control agents of insect pests in agriculture. He received his Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University where he began his studies on the interactions of insects and their fungal pathogens. R. JAMES COOK is adjunct professor of plant pathology at Washington State University and project leader of the Regional Cereal Disease Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. His research interests are the biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens, water relations of soil microorganisms, and cereal root rots. He earned his Ph.D. degree in phytopathology from the University of California, Berkeley. RANDALL A. CULPEPPER is a graduate of the University of Georgia with a B.S. degree in agricultural journalism. He has travelled extensively over the Southeast reporting on the state of agriculture. Most recently, he has been with the University of Georgia Department of Extension Horticulture. W. LEE DANIELS Since 1987 Daniels has been a professor of soil and environmental sciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, where he earned his Ph.D. degree in soil geomorphology.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS His research program focuses on soil disturbance, land restoration, plantsoil relationships, and soil organic matter interactions. DALE R. DARLING For 28 years, Darling has worked for E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, Inc. He is manager of Agricultural Associations. He holds an M.S. degree in plant pathology from Texas A&M University and has undertaken additional studies in plant physiology and biochemistry while working on a U.S. Air Force grant studying “Effects of Missile Fuels and Components on Plant Growth and Development, Soils, Soil Structures, and Aquatic Life.” THOMAS L. DOBBS is professor of agricultural economics at South Dakota State University where his research focuses on production economics and public policy aspects of sustainable agriculture. His Ph.D. degree is from the University of Maryland. Dobbs has written extensively on issues of economic development, resource economics, and farm management. LAURIE E. DRINKWATER is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California, Davis. She received a Ph.D. degree from the Department of Zoology at Davis. Her areas of research interest include agroecology, nutrient cycling in agricultural systems, and design of ecologically sound cropping systems. MICHAEL DUFFY is an associate professor of economics and extension economist at Iowa State University where he works in farm management, natural resources—especially land—and sustainable agriculture. He holds a Ph.D. degree from the Pennsylvania State University. JOSEPH P. FONTENOT is John W. Hancock, Jr., Professor of Animal Science at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His primary areas of research are forage utilization by ruminants, especially as related to sustainable agriculture, and use of biodegradable animal wastes as livestock feed. RAYMOND E. FRISBIE Since 1980, Frisbie has been professor of entomology and integrated pest management (IPM) coordinator at Texas A&M University. He has a Ph.D. in entomology from the University of California at Riverside. His areas of research and education are in IPM in cotton and other crops, insecticide resistance management, and farm-level decision support systems. JOHN C. GARDNER A research agronomist, Gardner is also superintendent of North Dakota State University's Carrington Research Extension Center located in central North Dakota near Carrington. As part of a university-nonprofit-farmer partnership, he is studying ecological aspects

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS of crop and livestock production in the Northern Great Plains. Gardner earned his Ph.D. degree in agronomy from the University of Nebraska. STEVEN J. GULDAN is a research agronomist with Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, East Troy, Wisconsin. He is presently working cooperatively with, and is based at, the Carrington Research Extension Center in North Dakota. Guldan is researching the incorporation of legumes into cropping systems. He was awarded a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from the University of Minnesota. E. SCOTT HAGOOD is associate professor, extension weed scientist, and extension project leader in the Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Hagood is doing applied research for weed control in agronomic crops. He received his Ph.D. degree from Purdue University. JONATHAN H. HARSCH This FarmFutures magazine contributing editor is a partner in the research and consulting firm of Hudson & Harsch. He earned his Ph.D. degree in literature at the University of Dublin, Ireland, and his current research projects include new industrial uses for crops—status of technology and commercial adoption. FLOYD F. HENDRIX, JR. Since 1973, Hendrix has been professor of plant pathology with a joint research-extension appointment. His Ph.D. degree in plant pathology was awarded by the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include developing information for integrated pest management (IPM) control of fruit diseases. His extension interests include combining this information with that from entomologists and horticulturists into an IPM production program. CHARLES E. HESS Sworn in on May 22, 1989, Hess is assistant secretary for science and education, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). He is responsible for USDA research and education programs in the food and agricultural sciences, including general supervision of the Agricultural Research Service, the Cooperative State Research Service, the Extension Service, and the National Agricultural Library. Hess earned his Ph.D. degree in horticulture from Purdue University. JEFF B. HILLARD is assistant professor of plant sciences at Louisiana Tech University. He has a Ph.D. degree in soil science from Texas A&M University and conducts soil fertility research studies on forages and small fruits. DAN L. HORTON is an associate professor in the extension entomology department at the University of Georgia. He earned his Ph.D. in entomology from the University of Arkansas. His primary interest is the application of integrated pest management principles to commercial fruit culture.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS KIRSTEN HURAL is a doctoral candidate in entomology at Cornell University. Her research interests are in the ecological genetics of host-pathogen interactions. JOHN E. IKERD is extension professor and coordinator of the Center for Sustainable Agriculture Systems, University of Missouri, Columbia. He has a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from the University of Missouri. His research and extension work emphasizes a holistic, systems approach to farm management and rural resource development. RHONDA R. JANKE An agronomy coordinator at Rodale Research Center, Janke is also adjunct assistant professor of agronomy, Pennsylvania State University. She supervises cropping systems research, collaborates with farmer cooperators in the Rodale Institute On-Farm Research program, and conducts research in the area of weed ecology. She holds a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from Cornell University. ROBERT A. KLICKER For 44 years, Klicker has been an active partner in Klicker Brothers & Sons farming operation. In addition to managing 15,000 acres, he has worked with agricultural researchers for 37 years. On-farm testing of his crops for the past 36 years has resulted—during the last 9 years—in the successful balancing of his soil for crops, tilth, and microbial life. Klicker introduced and implemented an artificial insemination program for beef cattle that is still being used after 29 years. He has been instrumental in forming a new organization called Progressive Farmers Inland Northwest. TERRY KLOPFENSTEIN is Kermit Wagner Professor of Animal Science at the University of Nebraska. He earned a Ph.D. degree from the Ohio State University and has been on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln faculty since 1965. He has been conducting research on forage and crop residue utilization and protein nutrition of cattle. Recent emphasis has been on systems of beef production. GERARD W. KREWER Since 1983, Krewer has been a University of Georgia extension horticulturist advising fruit growers and county agents. He earned his Ph.D. in plant physiology/horticulture from Clemson University. His areas of interest are the culture and management of blueberries, stone fruits, muscadine grapes, Asian pears, and Mayhaws. DAVID R. LANCE Since 1985, Lance has been a research entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the Northern Grain Insects Research Laboratory in Brookings, South Dakota. He earned his Ph.D. degree in entomology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His interests include insect behavior and ecology and their application to pest management.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS LES E. LANYON is an associate professor of soil fertility in the Department of Agronomy at the Pennsylvania State University. He earned a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from the Ohio State University. His area of interest is the plant nutrient dynamics of crops, farms, and agriculture. CURTIS A. LAUB is a researcher in the entomology department at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI&SU). He is currently involved in low-input sustainable agriculture research, with emphasis on natural controls of field crop pests. He received his M.S. degree from VPI &SU. DEBORAH K. LETOURNEAU is an associate professor of ecology in the Board of Environmental Studies, University of California at Santa Cruz. She earned her Ph.D. degree in entomology from the University of California at Berkeley. Her research interest is tritrophic interactions among plants, herbivores, and their natural enemies in natural and managed systems. JOHN M. LUNA is an assistant professor in the Department of Entomology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI&SU) and serves as extension coordinator for sustainable agriculture. He also is director of an interdisciplinary farming systems project. His research interests include habitat manipulation for managing weeds and insect pests, and the integration of cover crops into low-external input conservation tillage systems. Luna received his Ph.D. degree in entomology from VPI&SU. CLARENCE MENDS Since 1980, Mends has been a research associate and marketing analyst in the economics department at South Dakota State University (SDSU). He has an M.S. degree in economics from SDSU and is a member of a multidisciplinary research and extension team involved in farming systems studies at SDSU. JANE MT. PLEASANT is an assistant professor in the Department of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. She earned a Ph.D. degree in soil science from North Carolina State University. Her area of specialization is in soil and cropping systems management. WILLIAM M. MURPHY is a professor of agronomy in the Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont. He has a Ph.D. degree in agronomy from the University of Wisconsin. His main research interest concerns detailed measurements and dynamics of grass-legume swards under controlled grazing management. ELIZABETH W. NEUENDORFF Since 1982, Neuendorff has been a research associate at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Overton. She has an M.S. degree in horticulture from Texas A&M University. Her areas of specialization include temperate and small fruit physiology and management systems.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS GARY NIMR is a horticultural field technician for the Texas A&M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Overton. He earned his B.S. degree from Stephen F. Austin State University and is currently working on low-input sustainable management systems for strawberries and blueberries. CLAYTON W. OGG is with the Office of Policy Analysis at the Environmental Protection Agency. He has a Ph.D. degree from the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Minnesota. Much of his recent research focuses on integration of farm policy and environmental policy. ROBERT I. PAPENDICK Since 1972, Papendick has been research leader of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service's Land Management and Water Conservation research unit at Pullman, Washington. He earned a Ph.D. degree in soil physics from South Dakota State University. His research interests include dryland soil and water conservation and alternative agriculture. JAMES F. PARR is national program leader for Dryland Agriculture and Soil Fertility with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at Beltsville, Maryland. Since 1984, he has served as coordinator of a USDA/U.S. Agency for International Development cooperative project to improve the sustainability of farming systems in the semiarid tropics. Parr earned his Ph.D. degree in soil microbiology from Purdue University. He has broad experience in soil and water conservation and management of organic wastes to improve soil productivity. KIM PATTEN conducted research for Texas A&M on small fruit production systems from 1985 to 1990. He is presently a cranberry research-extension specialist for Washington State University. He has a Ph.D. degree in horticulture from Washington State University. NEIL H. PELSUE, JR., is chair of the Agricultural and Resource Economics Department at the University of Vermont, with extension, teaching, and research responsibilities in agricultural marketing and policy. He has conducted research in alternative agricultural enterprises and currently teaches a course in the economics of sustainable agriculture. In 1989–1990 he served as interim coordinator of the Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture program in the Northeast region. STEVEN E. PETERS Since 1986, Peters has been a project leader conducting farming systems research at the Rodale Institute Research Center. He has an M.S. degree in vegetable crops and soil science from Cornell University. From 1974 to 1981, he was a commercial market gardener. DOUGLAS G. PFEIFFER Since 1981, Pfeiffer has been a faculty member in the Department of Entomology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS State University. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in entomology from Washington State University. Pfeiffer is responsible for developing integrated pest management programs for trees and small fruits. Most of his research activity focuses on mating disruption and other alternative tactics and the development of action thresholds for foliar feeding arthropods. EDWIN G. RAJOTTE is associate professor of entomology at the Pennsylvania State University. He has a Ph.D. degree in entomology from Rutgers University. He is a specialist in fruit integrated pest management and information delivery systems. HAROLD F. REETZ, JR. Since 1982, Reetz has served as regional director, Potash & Phosphate Institute, responsible for education and research programs in crop and soil management to promote development and implementation of production practices that are agronomically sound, economically viable, and environmentally responsible. Reetz earned his Ph.D. degree from Purdue University in crop physiology and ecology. He has been involved in numerous national and international symposia and committee work related to developing and implementing best management practices. GAIL RICHARDSON is a senior research consultant to INFORM, a national environmental research and education organization. She has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Wisconsin and has directed INFORM 's agricultural water conservation program since 1982. ALAN J. SAWYER is an ecologist with the Plant Protection Research Unit of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service in Ithaca, New York. His research involves the use of systems analysis and modeling to study the spatial dynamics of insect populations and their fungal pathogens. He earned his Ph.D. degree in entomology from Michigan State University. NEILL SCHALLER Since September 1990, Schaller has been associate director of the Institute for Alternative Agriculture, Greenbelt, Maryland. For 2 years prior to that he was director of the Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture (LISA) research and education program in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Schaller has a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from the University of California-Berkeley. BLAINE G. SCHATZ As associate agronomist at the North Dakota State University Carrington Research Center, Schatz directs the field crops research effort in the area of traditional crop production studies. His interests are crop rotations, alternative crops and production systems, and field crop management. He earned an M.S. degree in agronomy at North Dakota State University.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS CAROL SHENNAN Since 1985 Shennan has been an assistant professor in the vegetable crops department, University of California, Davis. She has a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. Her research interests include resource use and nutrient cycling in cropping systems and plant responses to environmental stress. BARBARA J. SMITH is affiliated with the Small Fruit Research Station, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Her areas of research interest are diseases of small fruit and breeding for disease resistance. She earned a Ph.D. degree in plant pathology from Louisiana State University. JAMES D. SMOLIK is a professor in the Plant Science Department at South Dakota State University (SDSU), where he earned a Ph.D. degree in plant pathology. His research studies include long-term comparisons of alternative and conventional farming systems. He is also investigating the effects of nematodes on growth of several crops. Smolik manages SDSU's Northeast Research Station. JAMES L. STARR is a member of the faculty of plant pathology and microbiology at Texas A&M University. He has a Ph.D. degree in plant pathology from Cornell University. His research interests include nematode population dynamics, determination of damage functions for different nematode species-crop interactions, and the development and deployment of host resistance. NICHOLAS D. STONE In 1988, Stone came to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI&SU) to help form the Center for Computer-Aided Decision Making in the College of Agriculture. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Berkeley, and is an associate professor of entomology at VPI&SU. His research interests include population ecology, mathematical modeling, decision theory, and artificial intelligence. PRESTON G. SULLIVAN is a technical specialist for ATTRA (Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas), a nonprofit sustainable agricultural organization. He holds a Ph.D. degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in crop and soil environmental sciences. GERALD R. SUTTER After graduating from Iowa State University with a Ph.D. degree in entomology, Sutter conducted research on the development of new control technology for soil-inhibiting arthropod pests of cereals. He served as research leader for the entomology projects at the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service Northern Grain Insects Research Laboratory from 1972 to 1989.

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SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN THE FIELD: A PROCEEDINGS DANIEL B. TAYLOR is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He earned a Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from Washington State University. His current areas of research include the economics of low-input agriculture, international agricultural development, environmental impacts of agriculture, and public policy analysis. ARIENA H. C. VAN BRUGGEN Since 1986, van Bruggen has been an assistant professor of vegetable diseases in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of California at Davis. She received her Ph.D. degree from Cornell University. Her research interests include agricultural systems analysis and epidemiology of bacterial and fungal plant pathogens. DAVID H. VAUGHAN is a professor in the Department of Agricultural Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He earned a Ph.D. degree in biological and agricultural engineering from North Carolina State University. His areas of research include sustainable agricultural systems, conservation tillage/planting systems, agricultural energy analysis, and renewable energy resources, including biofuels. FEKEDE WORKNEH is a graduate research assistant in plant pathology in the Department of Plant Pathology, University of California at Davis.