Appendix B

Biographies of Speakers

John Auerbach, M.B.A., is Professor of Practice and Director of the Institute of Urban Health Research at Northeastern University. He was the Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health from 2007 to 2012. Under his leadership the Department developed new and innovative programs to address racial and ethnic disparities, to promote wellness (including the Mass in Motion campaign), to combat chronic disease and to support the successful implementation of the state’s health care reform initiative. From 2010 to 2011, Auerbach served as President of the Association of State and Territories Health Officials. Prior to his appointment as Commissioner, Auerbach had been the Executive Director of the Boston Public Health Commission for 9 years. As such he oversaw the health department for the City of Boston, the City’s Emergency Medical Services and the largest homeless shelter in New England. During this time period he was a member of the Board of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. He had previously worked at the State Health Department for a decade, first as the Chief of Staff and later as an Assistant Commissioner overseeing the HIV/AIDS Bureau during the initial years of the AIDS epidemic. Earlier in his career he was the administrator of Boston City Hospital’s Primary Care Residency Training Program and a Manager of one of the State’s First Community Health Centers.

Debbie I. Chang, M.P.H., as Vice President of Policy and Prevention for Nemours, is focusing on developing and achieving Nemours’ policy and advocacy goals; identifying, evaluating, replicating, and promot-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 47
Appendix B Biographies of Speakers John Auerbach, M.B.A., is Professor of Practice and Director of the Institute of Urban Health Research at Northeastern University. He was the Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health from 2007 to 2012. Under his leadership the Department developed new and innovative programs to address racial and ethnic disparities, to promote wellness (including the Mass in Motion campaign), to combat chronic disease and to support the successful implementation of the state’s health care reform initiative. From 2010 to 2011, Auerbach served as President of the Associa- tion of State and Territories Health Officials. Prior to his appointment as Commissioner, Auerbach had been the Executive Director of the Boston Public Health Commission for 9 years. As such he oversaw the health department for the City of Boston, the City’s Emergency Medical Services and the largest homeless shelter in New England. During this time period he was a member of the Board of the National Association of County and City Health Officials. He had previously worked at the State Health Department for a decade, first as the Chief of Staff and later as an Assis- tant Commissioner overseeing the HIV/AIDS Bureau during the initial years of the AIDS epidemic. Earlier in his career he was the administrator of Boston City Hospital’s Primary Care Residency Training Program and a Manager of one of the State’s First Community Health Centers. Debbie I. Chang, M.P.H., as Vice President of Policy and Prevention for Nemours, is focusing on developing and achieving Nemours’ policy and advocacy goals; identifying, evaluating, replicating, and promot- 47

OCR for page 47
48 POPULATION HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT ing model practices and policies in strategic areas such as innovation in child health promotion, prevention, and Nemours’ integrated system of care; and developing and advancing Nemours’ visionary child health prevention strategy across the enterprise. Ms. Chang is also leading a collaborative learning effort with eight communities across the country to harness and promote innovative policies and practices to improve the health and well-being of children in cross-sectoral (integrating health and other sectors serving children), place-based approaches. During the last 5 years at Nemours, she created and led Nemours Health & Prevention Ser- vices, an operating division devoted to improving children’s health over time through a cross-sectoral, community-based model in Delaware that includes developing, implementing, evaluating, and promoting model prevention interventions. Ms. Chang has more than 22 years of federal and state government and private-sector experience in the health field. She has worked on a range of key health programs and issues, including Medicaid, State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), Medicare, Maternal and Child Health, national health care reform, and financing coverage for the uninsured. She has held the following federal and state positions: Deputy Secretary of Health Care Financing at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, with oversight for the State of Maryland’s Medicaid program and the Maryland Children’s Health Program; Director of the Office of Legislation for the Health Care Financ- ing Administration (now the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services); and Director of SCHIP when it was first implemented in 1997. Ms. Chang also served as the Senior Health Policy Advisor to former U.S. Senator Donald W. Riegle, Jr., former chair of the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Health for Families and the Uninsured. She currently serves as the co- Principal Investigator on a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation evaluation grant, “Evaluation of School and Child Care Sector Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies in Delaware.” She is an active member on a number of boards, including Grantmakers in Health, Healthy Eating Active Living Convergence Partnership, National Institute for Children’s Healthcare Quality Policy Advisory, and Obesity National Advisory Committees, and the University of California, Los Angeles, Alliance for Information on Maternal and Child Health Support Center National Advisory Panel. Ms. Chang is a senior associate in the Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University. She has published work on integrating population health and medical care, SCHIP, and Maryland’s Managed Care Program. She holds a master’s degree in Public Health Policy and Administration from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

OCR for page 47
APPENDIX B 49 George R. Flores, M.D., M.P.H., is a Program Manager for The Cali- fornia Endowment’s (TCE’s) Healthy California Prevention team. His work focuses on grantmaking to improve health and equity through community-based prevention and a health workforce suited to health system reform. His work aims to strengthen collaborative work of public health, primary care, and community outreach for prevention to address the social and environmental factors that shape health outcomes. Dr. Flores previously managed grantmaking to develop models of health- supportive policies and community environments, including Healthy Eating Active Communities and the Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program, two nationally-prominent multisite, multisector pro- grams to prevent childhood obesity that provided key lessons for the development of TCE’s Building Healthy Communities strategy. Prior to the TCE, Dr. Flores served as Public Health Officer in San Diego County and in Sonoma County, also as Clinical Assistant Professor for the Uni- versity of California, San Francisco, Family Practice Residency Program, Director, Project HOPE in Guatemala, and Deputy Health Officer in Santa Barbara County. Dr. Flores received his M.D. from the University of Utah, and M.P.H. from Harvard. He is an alumnus of the Kennedy School of Government’s Executive Program and the National Public Health Leader- ship Institute. He is a member of two Institute of Medicine committees that published the milestone reports Preventing Childhood Obesity: Health in the Balance and The Future of the Public’s Health in the 21st Century. Dr. Flores is a founder of the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California. Over his career, Dr. Flores has been a resource to government and nongovern- ment organizations. He has given hundreds of presentations and writ- ten dozens of reports for diverse audiences on topics, including disease prevention, community health, immigrant health, health disparities, and environmental policy. Dr. Flores’ work has been published in the Journal of the American Public Health Association, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and Preventing Chronic Disease, among others. He co-authored a book chapter, “Latino Children’s Health and the Environment,” in At Risk! Latino Children’s Health, recently published by Arte Publico Press. Dr. Flores was recognized by the National Hispanic Medical Association as 2011 Physician of the Year for his work that addresses social and environ- mental inequities and the role of communities in advancing policy and systems change to improve health. His vision is for every community to be a healthy, safe, and supportive place to raise children, go to school, work, and play. James A. Hester, Ph.D., M.S., has been active in health reform and popu- lation health for almost four decades. His most recent position was the Acting Director of the Population Health Models Group at the Innovation

OCR for page 47
50 POPULATION HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT Center in Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) assisting in the development of delivery system transformation and payment reform initiatives such as Pioneer accountable care organizations, medical homes, and population health models. Prior to joining CMS, he was the Director of the Health Care Reform Commission for the Vermont state legislature. The commission was charged with developing a comprehensive package of health reform legislation and recommending the long-term strategy to ensure that all Vermonters have access to affordable, quality health care. The delivery system reforms included a statewide enhanced medi- cal home program and the development of pilot community health sys- tems based on the ACO concept. Dr. Hester has held senior management positions with MVP Healthcare in Vermont, ChoiceCare in Cincinnati, Pilgrim Health Care in Boston, and Tufts Medical Center in Boston. He began his managed care career as Director of Applied Research for the Kaiser ­ ermanente Medical Care Program in Los Angeles, California. His P initial introduction to analyzing complex systems came in the aerospace industry through work on the Apollo project’s rocket engines and high powered gas dynamic lasers. Dr. Hester earned his Ph.D. in urban stud- ies, and his M.S. and B.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a continuing interest in health services research and teaching, and has held faculty appointments at the University of Vermont (UVM), University of Cincinnati, Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Massachusetts. He has served on the boards of Vermont Information Technology Leaders, the Vermont Program for Quality Health Care, and UVM’s College of Nurs- ing and Health Science. Genoveva “Veva” Islas-Hooker, M.P.H., is the Regional Program Direc- tor for the Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (CCROPP), a program of the Public Health Institute, which works to create healthy communities in California’s San Joaquin Valley through policy, systems, and environmental change. At the heart of CCROPP’s efforts has been building the capacity of grassroots community members to be leaders for change in their communities. She has more than 20 years of experience working in the public health field in both public and private sectors. She has worked for the California Department of Health Services, Kern Health Systems, Bakersfield College, Blue Cross of California, the Kern County Department of Public Health, and the Darin M. Camarena Health Center Inc. Born in Fresno, she grew up in the rural farm-working communities of the San Joaquin Valley. Islas-Hooker’s bachelor’s degree in health science, with an emphasis in community health, is from Cali- fornia State University, Fresno; she earned an M.P.H. in health education and promotion at Loma Linda University. She is a member of the Ameri-

OCR for page 47
APPENDIX B 51 can Public Health Association. She is also the current board chair for the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California and a board member for Califor- nia Food Policy Advocates and the California Institute for Rural Studies. Janine E. Janosky, Ph.D., a prominent authority on improving health, Dr. Janosky is a Vice President and leads the Center for Community Health Improvement at the Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron. The center provides a robust infrastructure for both clinical and community-based research, structuring ways that scientists and clinicians reach patients beyond traditional venues and in community settings, thus addressing patients’ needs and environments while expanding and accelerating research. Further, the center is implementing processes for increased qual- ity and effectiveness, lowering cost, and enhanced patient experiences and engagement, with an emphasis upon the medically underserved populations in the Akron region; and developing a nationally-recognized integrated health and wellness model, the accountable care community. Dr. Janosky is an expert in attracting research funding and achieving impactful community health initiatives. Most recently, Dr. Janosky served as the Vice Provost for Research at Central Michigan University where she led the effort to facilitate research opportunities, administer intellectual property activities, direct university commercialization endeavors and technology transfer activities, and develop innovative educational pro- grams. Prior to joining Central Michigan, Janosky served as the Executive Director of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine’s Center for Primary Care Community-Based Research, an entity she envisioned and created. Joshua M. Sharfstein, M.D., is the Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Previously, he served as Principal Deputy Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from 2009-2011 and as the Commissioner of Health in Baltimore, Maryland, from Decem- ber 2005 to March 2009. From July 2001 to December 2005, Dr. Sharfstein served on the Minority Staff of the Committee on Government Reform of the U.S. House of Representatives, working for Congressman Henry A. Waxman. He serves on the Health Information Technology Policy Com- mittee for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, on the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice of the Institute of Medicine, and on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Medical Association. . Lillian Shirley, B.S.N., M.P.H., M.P.A., Director of the Multnomah County Health Department, provides public health leadership in col- laboration with community partners to address the county’s health needs,

OCR for page 47
52 POPULATION HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT and offers health policy leadership on both a county and state level. Her jurisdiction is known for innovation in policy and systems approaches to improving and protecting the public’s health. Under her leadership the jurisdiction has implemented a “health in all policies” approach to trans- portation, planning, built environment, and food policies. They were one of the first counties in the nation to develop a multisector City/County Climate Action Plan and a health equity lens for resource distribution. The Governor of Oregon appointed Ms. Shirley Vice-Chair of the Oregon Health Policy Board charged with overseeing Health Reform in Oregon and in early 2013 invited her to serve on an Affordable Care Act (ACA) Advisory Workgroup to help ensure Oregon maintains a sound insurance market due to ACA reform actions. Ms. Shirley is currently Immediate Past President of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). She was elected Vice-Chair of an eight organization, three county ACO in Oregon—Health Share of Oregon. Ms. Shirley was also invited to be a committee member for the U.S. Environmental Pro- tection Agency Local Government Advisory Committee and is a liaison representative for NACCHO on the Community Preventative Services Task Force. Multnomah County Health Department was selected to serve as the convening organization and legal entity for an 18 organization col- laborative including four counties and 15 hospitals to jointly undertake a comprehensive community health needs assessment and planning pro- cess that will integrate the hospitals’ requirements for IRS reporting and the Public Health Departments’ foundation for accreditation. Multnomah County Health Department has integrated Health Outcomes and Goals in the Portland/Multnomah Climate Action Plan, the 25-year planning document known as the Portland Plan and included active living, healthy eating goals in the regional Built Environment Atlas—all planning, devel- opment, and transportation multisector documents. Her department is the largest provider of safety-net services in the state of Oregon. A feder- ally qualified health center with integrated primary care, dental, phar- macy, and mental health services, all of their clinics have been recognized as Tier 3 Primary Medical Homes. In addition, the department provides health services in all county jails. Prior to coming to Oregon, Ms. Shirley was Director of Public Health in Boston. After participating in the merger of Boston’s public hospital with Boston University’s medical center, Ms. Shirley served as the first executive director of the newly formed Boston Public Health Commission. Ms. Shirley received a master’s degree in pub- lic health from Boston University and a master’s degree in public admin- istration at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard Univer- sity. Ms. Shirley served for 9 years as a board member of CareOregon, the state’s largest Medicaid insurer. She served as Vice President of the Public Health Foundation, member of the Board of Oregon Public Health Insti-

OCR for page 47
APPENDIX B 53 tute, the Portland Sustainable Development Commission, OHSU School of Medicine Department of Community Medicine Adjunct Faculty, and Board Member of North by Northeast Community Health Center. Stephen M. Shortell, Ph.D., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the Blue Cross of Cali- fornia Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management and Dean Emeritus at the School of Public Health at the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, and also Professor of Organization Behavior at the Haas School of Business at Berkeley. He is a behavioral scientist who has spent most of his career examining the factors influencing organizational inno- vation and performance in the health sector particularly in regard to integrated delivery systems and quality improvement. His papers have appeared in a wide variety of organizational and health services/health policy research journals and he is the author or co-author of 10 books. Dr. Shortell is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, past edi- tor of Health Services Research, and past President of AcademyHealth. His work, along with his colleagues, has been recognized through receipt of the distinguished Baxter Allegiance/Graham Prize for their contributions to health services research, the Distinguished Investigator Award from AcademyHealth, and the Distinguished Research Scholar Award from the Division of Healthcare Management of the Academy of Management. Julie A. Trocchio, M.S., B.S.N., is senior director of Community Benefit and Continuing Care for the Catholic Health Association (CHA) of the United States in Washington, DC. She coordinates CHA activities related to planning and reporting community benefits and leads CHA advocacy on the charitable purpose of nonprofit health care. She also coordinates CHA programs and advocacy related to the well-being of aged and chron- ically ill persons in need of long-term care and home and community- based services. Ms. Trocchio earned a degree in nursing from Georgetown University and a master’s degree in community health nursing from the University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore. Stella Whitney-West, M.B.A., has more than two decades of experience working with governance and policy boards of nonprofit organizations and more than 20 years of senior management experience in the Twin Cities nonprofit community. She is CEO of NorthPoint Health & Wellness Center a federally qualified health center with medical, dental, behavioral health and human services. The clinic has been accredited by Joint Com- mission since 1976 and is a certified health care home. NorthPoint utilizes a team-based integrated model of care that includes community health workers, social workers and client advocates to address four strategic areas: primary care, community health, social determinates of health,

OCR for page 47
54 POPULATION HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT and health equity. Recently, Ms. Whitney-West was appointed to the Min- nesota Health Exchange Advisory Task Force and serves on the board of directors for Urban Home Works, Twin Cities LISC and Minnesota Asso- ciation of Community Health Centers. Ms. Whitney-West holds an M.B.A. from the University of St. Thomas and a B.S. degree in biology from the University of Minnesota. Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., is board-certified in family medicine and trained in preventive medicine and public health. From 1990 to 2001, she practiced medicine as a faculty member of the University of Califor- nia, San Diego (UCSD), Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. She transitioned to the County of San Diego Health and Human Ser- vices Agency in 2001, where she has served as the Public Health Officer since February 2007. In this position, she has oversight for approximately 500 employees with a budget of approximately $100 million serving a county of 3.1 million residents. She is an Adjunct Professor at San Diego State University (SDSU) Graduate School of Public Health and a UCSD Volunteer Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wooten obtained her undergraduate degree from Spelman College; master’s of public health and doctor of medicine degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; family medicine residency training from the Georgetown/Providence Hospital Family Medicine Program; and preventive medicine residency training from SDSU. Dr. Wooten is on the executive committee for the California Conference of County and City Local Health Officers, and is a board member for the National Association of County and City Health Officials.