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Webinar Speaker Biosketches

John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., serves as senior advisor for public health at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). He also leads NIEHS efforts on climate change and human health. In this capacity, he serves as Department of Health and Human Services principal to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, for which he also co-chairs the Interagency Cross-Cutting Group on Climate Change and Human Health. Dr. Balbus has authored studies and lectures on global climate change and health, transportation-related air pollution, the toxic effects of chemicals, and regulatory approaches to protecting susceptible subpopulations. Before joining the NIEHS, Dr. Balbus was chief health scientist for the nongovernmental organization the Environmental Defense Fund. He served on the faculty of The George Washington University, where he was founding director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health, founding co-director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment, and acting chairman of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health. He maintains an adjunct faculty appointment at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Balbus received his A.B. degree in biochemistry from Harvard University, his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Anantha Duraiappah, Ph.D., is the executive director of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) in Bonn, Germany. He is an experienced environmental development economist whose work largely focuses on the equity of access and use of ecosystem services. In his previous post as chief of the Ecosystem Services and Economics Unit of the United Nations Environment Programme, Dr. Duraiappah was involved in the initiation of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services and has since then played a pivotal role in its approval process. He initiated



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B Webinar Speaker Biosketches John M. Balbus, M.D., M.P.H., serves as senior advisor for public health at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). He also leads NIEHS efforts on climate change and human health. In this capacity, he serves as Department of Health and Human Services principal to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, for which he also co-chairs the Interagency Cross-Cutting Group on Climate Change and Human Health. Dr. Balbus has authored studies and lectures on global climate change and health, transportation-related air pollution, the toxic effects of chemicals, and regulatory approaches to protecting susceptible subpopulations. Before joining the NIEHS, Dr. Balbus was chief health scientist for the nongovernmental organization the Environ- mental Defense Fund. He served on the faculty of The George Washington University, where he was founding director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health, founding co-director of the Mid-Atlantic Center for Children’s Health and the Environment, and acting chairman of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health. He maintains an adjunct faculty appointment at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Balbus received his A.B. degree in bio- chemistry from Harvard University, his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Anantha Duraiappah, Ph.D., is the executive director of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) in Bonn, Germany. He is an experienced environmental- development economist whose work largely focuses on the equity of access and use of ecosystem services. In his previous post as chief of the Ecosystem Services and Economics Unit of the United Nations Environ- ment Programme, Dr. Duraiappah was involved in the initiation of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services and has since then played a pivotal role in its approval process. He initiated 67

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68 INCLUDING HEALTH IN GLOBAL FRAMEWORKS the Inclusive Wealth Report and continues to successfully incorporate his expertise in fields related to the green economy, science–policy interaction, economics, development, and ecosystem services into his work at IHDP. Richard A. Easterlin, Ph.D., is a professor of economics at the University of Southern California. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Easterlin is an internationally renowned scholar for his work in economic history, economic demography, and subjective well-being. He has written extensively about the spread of modern economic growth, including its causes and consequences, and is the recognized founder of happiness economics. In recent years he has studied changes in subjective well-being over the lifecycle, with a view to clarifying the relative role in determining people’s feelings of well-being of living levels, family life, health, and job conditions. Prior to joining the University of Southern California, Dr. Easterlin was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania for almost 30 years. He has also been a visiting professor and scholar at the California Institute of Technology, Stanford University, Texas A&M University, the University of Washington, the University of Warwick in England, and Lund University in Sweden. He is a past president of the Economic History Association and the Population Association of America, a fellow of the Econometric Society, and a distinguished fellow of the American Economic Association. Kristie L. Ebi, Ph.D., M.P.H., has been conducting research on the impacts of and adaptation to climate change for more than 15 years, primarily extreme events, thermal stress, foodborne diseases, and vectorborne diseases. She has worked with the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Programme, the International Develop- ment Research Centre, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and others on designing and implementing adaptation measures in low- income countries, and has worked with the Center for Climate Strategies on identifying adaptation options for U.S. states conducting vulnerability and adaptation assessments. She was a lead author for the human health chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s fourth assessment report and was lead author for human health for the U.S. Synthesis and Assessment Product Analyses of the Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems. She has edited 4 books on climate change and health, and has authored more than 80 publications. Dr. Ebi’s scientific training includes an M.S. in toxicology,

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APPENDIX B 69 a Ph.D. and M.P.H. in epidemiology, and 2 years of postgraduate research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Professor Sir Andrew Haines, M.D., MBBS, is a professor of public health and primary care with joint appointments in the Department of Social and Environmental Health Research and Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He was previously director (originally dean) of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine for almost 10 years, having previously been professor of primary health care at University College London between 1987 and 2000. He also worked part time as a general practitioner in North London for many years. Dr. Haines’ research interests are in epidemiology and health services research, focusing particularly on research in primary care and the study of environmental influences on health, including the potential effects of climate change and the health cobenefits of the low-carbon economy. He has been a member of a number of major international and national committees, including the Medical Research Council (MRC) Global Health Group (chair), the MRC Strategy Group, the UK Health and Social Care Policy Committee (chair), and the World Health Organization Advisory Committee on Health Research (chair). He was a member of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for the second and third assessment reports and is currently a review editor for the fifth report. Stéphane Hallegatte, Ph.D., is a senior economist with the World Bank. His work includes macroeconomic dynamics and green growth strategies, urban economics and environmental policies, climate change vulner- ability and adaptation, and disaster risk management. He is a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) special report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate, published in 2012, and a contributing author to the IPCC’s fifth assessment report, to be published in 2014. He also co-led with Marianne Fay the World Bank flagship report Inclusive Green Growth: the Pathway to Sustainable Development in 2012 and is a core writing team member for the 2014 World Development Report Managing Risks for Development. Dr. Hallegatte holds an engineering degree from the École Polytechnique and a Ph.D. in economics from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.

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70 INCLUDING HEALTH IN GLOBAL FRAMEWORKS Marc Levy is deputy director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, a unit of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He is also an adjunct professor in Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is a political scientist specializing in the human dimensions of global environmental change. His primary research areas are climate–security linkages, global environmental governance, and sustainability metrics. He has published in a wide variety of subtopics, including emerging infectious disease modeling, anthropogenic drivers of global change, sustainability indicators, vulnerability mapping, and public–private partnerships. His research has been supported by a variety of agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautic and Space Administration, the United Nations Environment Programme, and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. He has served on several committees of the National Academy of Sciences, as well as on a number of international assessments, and is currently a lead author of the chapter on human security in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s fifth assessment report. He is incoming chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Measuring Sustainability. Kevin J. Mumford, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the economics department at Purdue University, where he has been since 2007. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and a B.A. in economics from Brigham Young University. His research has focused on taxation, fertility and families, labor supply, poverty, and the role of human capital in measuring national wealth (economic sustainability). Dr. Mumford has received research grants from the Purdue Research Foundation, the Institute for Research on Poverty, the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. In 2010 he was awarded the John and Mary Willis Young Faculty Scholar Award for research excellence. John Norris, M.P.A., is the executive director of the Sustainable Security and Peacebuilding Initiative at the Center for American Progress. In that role, he served as senior adviser to John Podesta during his work on the Secretary General’s High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons for the Post-2015 Development Agenda. Mr. Norris has served in a number of senior roles in government, international institutions, and nonprofits. He previously served as the executive director of the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress and was the chief of political

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APPENDIX B 71 affairs for the United Nations Mission in Nepal. Previously, Mr. Norris served as the Washington chief of staff for the International Crisis Group, conducting extensive field work and senior-level advocacy for resolving conflicts in Africa, the Balkans, and South Asia. Earlier in his career, he served as the director of communications for U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Strobe Talbott. He also worked as a speechwriter and field disaster expert at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Mr. Norris is the author of several books, including the Disaster Gypsies, a memoir of his work in the field of emergency relief, and Collision Course: NATO, Russia, and Kosovo. He has published commentary in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. Kumanan Rasanathan, M.B.Ch.B., M.P.H., FAFPHM, is a public health physician currently working for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in New York on district health system strengthening to improve the delivery of maternal and child health services in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. He is also the UNICEF focal point for health in the post-2015 development agenda and was a member of the task team managing the global thematic consultation on health for the post-2015 discussions. Prior to joining UNICEF, Dr. Rasanathan worked at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva on primary health care and social determinants of health. His work on social determinants focused on a range of issues including climate change, human rights, noncommunicable diseases, economic crises, migration, and social protection. Prior to joining the WHO, Kumanan worked in a range of roles in Australia, China, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom as a clinician, researcher, policy maker, and programme manager in clinical practice, vaccine clinical trials, primary health care, national health policy, and reducing inequities in maternal and child health. R. David Simpson, Ph.D., is director for ecosystem economic studies in the National Center for Environmental Economics at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His other positions have included senior fellow at Resources for the Future, associate professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies, and visiting professor at University College London. His work has focused on the nonmarket valuation of biological resources, and he has published a number of papers on these and other topics. Dr. Simpson has consulted in the development of the United Nations’ System of Economic- Environmental Accounts and serves on the Policy and Technical Experts

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72 INCLUDING HEALTH IN GLOBAL FRAMEWORKS Committee advising the World Bank’s Wealth Accounting for the Value of Ecosystem Services program. Dr. Simpson received his B.A. in economics from Whitman College and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.