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Appendix C


Biographies of Speakers

 (Affiliations and titles listed at the time of the conference)

June 7, 2012

Welcome

Lance A. Davis (NAE member) is the executive officer of the National Academy of Engineering. Under a Congressional charter, the Academy provides advice to the federal government, when requested, on matters of science and technology. As executive officer, Davis is the chief operating officer of the Academy, responsible for the program, financial and membership operations of the Academy, reporting to the president.

Prior to joining the Academy, Davis served as deputy director for defense research and engineering (laboratory management and technology transition) at the Pentagon from 1994 to 1999. In this capacity, he exercised oversight responsibility for the $11B DOD laboratory system and the dual use and technology transfer activities of the DOD. He chaired the Lab Consolidation Working Group charged with restructuring the DOD lab system and the Affordability Task Force charged with balancing the cost/performance equation in Defense Science and Technology. Other major activities included the Quadrennial Defense Review, Lab Quality Improvement Program, Lab Diversification Program, Small Business Innovation Research, Industry IR&D, Manufacturing Science and Technology, and the Defense Technical Information Center. Davis spent the majority of his career in industry at Allied-Signal Inc. He joined the then-Allied Chemical as a research scientist in 1968 and moved through a succession of R&D management positions leading to appointment as vice president of corporate research and development in 1984. He continued in this capacity until joining the Defense Department in 1994. As vice president of R&D, he was responsible for a corporate staff of up to 450 with an annual expense budget in current dollars of about $100 million and a capital budget of $15 million, engaged in research and new product development related to metals, ceramics, crystal growth, electro-optics, device fabrication, thin film deposition, polymer chemistry, engineered plastics, fibers and films, composites, and biotechnology.

Davis is an experienced leader in execution and management of complex research, engineering, process, and product development for materials, components, and systems; in technology policy development and execution on the national level; and in team building, total quality management/business process reengineering, and technology transition. Davis graduated Summa cum Laude from Lafayette College in 1961 with a B.S. in metallurgical engineering. He received a master of engineering degree in 1963 and a Ph.D. in engineering and applied science from Yale University in 1966. He spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Yale before joining Allied. Davis is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. He was elected to the National Academy



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Appendix C Biographies of Speakers (Affiliations and titles listed at the time of the conference) June 7, 2012 Welcome Lance A. Davis (NAE member) is the executive officer of the National Academy of Engineering. Under a Congressional charter, the Academy provides advice to the federal government, when requested, on matters of science and technology. As executive officer, Davis is the chief operating officer of the Academy, responsible for the program, financial and membership operations of the Academy, reporting to the president. Prior to joining the Academy, Davis served as deputy director for defense research and engineering (laboratory management and technology transition) at the Pentagon from 1994 to 1999. In this capacity, he exercised oversight responsibility for the $11B DOD laboratory system and the dual use and technology transfer activities of the DOD. He chaired the Lab Consolidation Working Group charged with restructuring the DOD lab system and the Affordability Task Force charged with balancing the cost/performance equation in Defense Science and Technology. Other major activities included the Quadrennial Defense Review, Lab Quality Improvement Program, Lab Diversification Program, Small Business Innovation Research, Industry IR&D, Manufacturing Science and Technology, and the Defense Technical Information Center. Davis spent the majority of his career in industry at Allied-Signal Inc. He joined the then-Allied Chemical as a research scientist in 1968 and moved through a succession of R&D management positions leading to appointment as vice president of corporate research and development in 1984. He continued in this capacity until joining the Defense Department in 1994. As vice president of R&D, he was responsible for a corporate staff of up to 450 with an annual expense budget in current dollars of about $100 million and a capital budget of $15 million, engaged in research and new product development related to metals, ceramics, crystal growth, electro- optics, device fabrication, thin film deposition, polymer chemistry, engineered plastics, fibers and films, composites, and biotechnology. Davis is an experienced leader in execution and management of complex research, engineering, process, and product development for materials, components, and systems; in technology policy development and execution on the national level; and in team building, total quality management/business process reengineering, and technology transition. Davis graduated Summa cum Laude from Lafayette College in 1961 with a B.S. in metallurgical engineering. He received a master of engineering degree in 1963 and a Ph.D. in engineering and applied science from Yale University in 1966. He spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Yale before joining Allied. Davis is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. He was elected to the National Academy 117

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS of Engineering in 1992 and received the Defense Manufacturing Excellence Award from the Multi-Association Industry Affordability Task Force in December 1999. Session I: Statistics on the Career Pathways of Women of Color Faculty in Academia: Where We Stand: Commissioned Research MODERATOR: Lydia Villa-Komaroff is a member of the board of directors and chief scientific officer at Cytonome/ST, LLC and a member of the board of directors of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center. During her 20-year research career, she held positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard University, University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Harvard Medical School. Her research was focused on molecular biology of protein synthesis, protein processing, and developmental neuroscience. As a science administrator, she served as vice president for research at Northwestern University in Illinois and vice president for research and chief operating officer of Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, MA. Villa-Komaroff has served on several NRC committees. She is a member of the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine (CWSEM) and was a member of the Committee on U.S. Competitiveness: Underrepresented Groups and Expansion of the Science and Engineering Workforce Pipeline. She was elected to a 4-year term on the board of directors of AAAS and was non-executive chair of the board of directors of Transkaryotic Therapies, Inc. Villa-Komaroff received her A.B. from Goucher College and her Ph.D. from MIT. SPEAKERS: Donna K. Ginther is a professor of economics and the director of the Center for Science Technology & Economic Policy at the Institute for Policy & Social Research at the University of Kansas. Prior to joining the University of Kansas faculty, she was a research economist and associate policy adviser in the regional group of the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta from 2000 to 2002, and she taught at Washington University from 1997 to 2000 and at Southern Methodist University from 1995 to 1997. Her major fields of study are scientific labor markets, gender differences in employment outcomes, wage inequality, scientific entrepreneurship, and children’s educational attainments. Ginther has been published in several journals, including the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Demography, and the Papers and Proceedings of the American Economic Association. She has also received research funding from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the Kauffman Foundation. She is currently a member of the board of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession of the American Economic Association, and a member of the board of trustees of the Southern Economic Association. A native of Wisconsin, Ginther received her doctorate in economics in 1995, master’s degree in economics in 1991, and bachelor’s degree in economics in 1987, all from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Shulamit Kahn has been at Boston University (BU)’s School of Management since 1987. She received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in economics in 1983 and taught at the University of California, Irvine, in the intervening years. Her specialty is labor economics and human resources. Her recent and ongoing research revolves around two major topics. The first is the careers of male and female academics in science. Her present work in this 118

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS area (joint with Donna Ginther) concentrates on academic careers in biomedicine and is being funded by the National Institute on Aging of the NIH. In another stream of current research joint with Megan MacGarvie, Professor Kahn is studying the contributions of foreign Ph.D. students to global knowledge creation and diffusion, entrepreneurship and innovation; the work on innovation is also joint with Donna Ginther. This work, funded by the National Science Foundation, has been presented at universities and conferences around the world. As part of her recent service to the university, she served on the BU College of Arts and Sciences Dean Search Committee and the BU Law School Dean Search Committee. In service related to women in academia, she sat on the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession, was chair of the Boston University Faculty Council’s Committee on Diversity, and was a co-author of “Major Findings of the 2006 Survey on Equity and Diversity at Boston University.” She is currently teaching primarily undergraduates and is coordinator for a core SMG course on statistics and economics. Sylvia Hurtado is professor and director of the Higher Education Research Institute at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), in the Graduate School of Education and Information Sciences. Just prior to coming to UCLA, she served as director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education at the University of Michigan. Hurtado has published numerous articles and books related to her primary interest in student educational outcomes, campus climates, college impact on student development, and diversity in higher education. She has served on numerous editorial boards for journals in education and on the boards for the American Association of Higher Education (AAHE) and the Higher Learning Commission, and she is past-president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). Black Issues in Higher Education named her among the top 15 influential faculty whose work has had an impact on the academy. She obtained her Ph.D. in education from UCLA, Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education, and A.B. from Princeton University in sociology. Hurtado has coordinated several national research projects, including a U.S. Department of Education- sponsored project on how colleges are preparing students to achieve the cognitive, social, and democratic skills to participate in a diverse democracy. She is launching an NIH project on the preparation of underrepresented students for biomedical and behavioral science research careers. She has also studied assessment, reform, and innovation in undergraduate education on a project through the National Center for Postsecondary Improvement. Session II: Putting a Face to a Statistic: A Panel of Women of Color in Academia MODERATOR: Joan W. Bennett (NAS member) is a professor in the Department of Plant Biology and Pathology and the associate vice president for the Office for Promotion of Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics at Rutgers University. She is a past president of the American Society for Microbiology and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Bennett has done work in fungal genetics as well as in women’s studies. She taught a popular course, “Biology of Women,” beginning in 1976 while she was at Tulane University (1971-2006). She is currently a leader of her institution’s NSF ADVANCE project on women faculty. Bennett earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and history from Upsala College and a master’s and doctorate degree in botany from the University of Chicago. 119

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS SPEAKERS: Evelynn M. Hammonds, dean of Harvard College and Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies, began her tenure as dean of Harvard College on June 1, 2008. Prior to this appointment, she served as Harvard University’s first senior vice provost for faculty development and diversity beginning in July 2005. Hammonds joined the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 2002 after teaching at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she was the founding director of the Center for the Study of Diversity in Science, Technology and Medicine. Her scholarly interests include the history of scientific, medical, and sociopolitical concepts of race, the history of disease and public health, gender in science and medicine, and African-American history. She is most recently the author of The Nature of Difference: Sciences of Race in the United States from Jefferson to Genomics and several other books and scholarly articles. Hammonds received her B.S. in physics from Spelman College. She earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology, a master’s degree in physics from MIT, and a Ph.D. in the history of science from Harvard. She holds honorary doctoral degrees from Spelman and Bates Colleges. Gilda Barabino is a professor and associate chair for graduate studies in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and at Emory University. She recently served as the inaugural vice provost for academic diversity and is credited with establishing a legacy to strengthen diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech. Barabino received her B.S. degree in chemistry from Xavier University of Louisiana and her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Rice University. After earning her doctorate, she served as a research process engineer at Rohm and Haas Company. Barabino then joined the chemical engineering faculty at Northeastern University where she rose to the rank of professor and served as vice provost for undergraduate education. Her research focuses on cell and tissue responses to mechanical forces in the context of sickle cell disease and orthopedic tissue engineering. She also investigates race and gender in research settings and science identity formation. Barabino has an extensive record of leadership and service in the chemical and biomedical engineering communities. She is a former member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research Council, the NIH Bioengineering, Technology and Surgical Sciences Study Section and the congressionally appointed NIH Sickle Cell Disease Advisory Committee. She has served on the board of directors and as treasurer of the Biomedical Engineering Society and began a two-year term as president in 2012. She serves on the advisory board of the Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists and the Harvard Medical School Women of Color in Academic Medicine Advisory Committee. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). She was selected as a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer 2012-2014 and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the BMES Diversity Award, the American Society for Engineering Education/Dow Outstanding Faculty Award, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Minority Affairs Committee (MAC) Distinguished Service Award, and the AIChE MAC Eminent Chemical Engineers Award. Barabino is a recognized innovator, researcher, and consultant on faculty development and diversity in science and engineering. She currently directs the National Science Foundation (NSF) Minority Faculty Development Workshop and serves as principal investigator on the NSF ADVANCE Leadership Award, “Cross-Disciplinary Initiative for Minority Women Faculty,” an 120

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS initiative designed to enhance the socialization of tenure-track minority women into academic careers in engineering. Patricia Taboada-Serrano is assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. She was born in Brazil and raised in Bolivia. She is a chemical engineer and has an M.Sc. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering. She has worked as a research and development engineer at the Center for Applied Research in Bolivia, a postdoctoral research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and an instructor at Simon Bolivar University (Venezuela) and the Catholic University (Bolivia). She has over twenty scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings, numerous conference presentations, and two patents pending. Her research interests include nanothermodynamics and the application of nanotechnology in alternative energy systems. She is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Bolivian Institute of Engineers, and the InterAmerican Network of Academies of Sciences (IANAS) Women for Science Working Group. Tamisha Vaughan is a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. She is a graduate of Johnson C. Smith University of Charlotte, North Carolina, where she majored in biology. While participating in several scientific organizations, including two NIH- funded programs, she gained substantial research experience, which changed her career goal from medical school to study neurosurgery to graduate school to study immunology. Following graduation, Tamisha took a nontraditional route to graduate school by joining a NIH- funded post-baccalaureate program at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VT-PREP). During her post-baccalaureate experience, Tamisha completed all of the required coursework for a doctorate degree prior to acceptance into the university as a degree-seeking student. This allowed her the freedom to focus on her research in the Innate Immunity and Inflammation Laboratory. Tamisha is now a postdoctoral scientist at Emory University School of Medicine. She now applies her immunology background in a hematology/oncology setting, where she studies the involvement of Grb2- associated binding proteins in hematopoiesis and immune deficiencies. Session III: Minority Women and Multiple Marginality: Gender, Race and Equity in Science Education and Research MODERATOR: Florence B. Bonner was the former associate vice president for research compliance before being appointed as the senior vice president for research and compliance as of July 2008 at Howard University. She is a professor of behavioral sciences and served as the chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology from 1992-2007; founder and director of the African American Women’s Institute and the Women’s Studies Program at Howard. She is a member of CWSEM. She also served as a senior fellow at the NSF. Before coming to Howard, she was the executive director of the Center for Women in Government at the State University of New York at Albany for four years. She also served as cochair on the development of the Strategic Framework I (SFI) and co-coordinator for the social, behavioral, and economic sciences in the development of SFII. She has been an active researcher at Howard and has been awarded ten grants from various agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and National Cancer Institute. 121

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS SPEAKER: Joan C. Williams, a prizewinning author and leading expert on work/family issues, is the author of Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What To Do About It (Oxford University Press, 2000), which won the 2000 Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, and Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter (Harvard University Press, 2010). Called “something of a rock star” in her field by New York Times Magazine, Williams has been successful in reaching extraordinarily diverse audiences and has been quoted in sources as diverse as the Washington Post, Redbook, the Wall Street Journal, Human Resource Executive, Oprah Magazine and the Yale Law Review. A frequent guest on radio and television, she has taught at Harvard and University of Virginia law schools and is currently distinguished professor, Hastings Foundation Chair, and founding director of the Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law. The author or co-author of six books and over seventy academic articles, she received the American Bar Foundation’s Outstanding Scholar of the Year Prize in 2012, the American Bar Association’s Margaret Brent Award for Women Lawyers of Achievement in 2006, and gave the 2008 Massey Lectures in American Civilization at Harvard University. She has given hundreds of speeches and presentations in North and Latin America to groups as diverse as the Society for Human Resource Management, the Denver Rotary Club, the American Philosophical Society, and the Modern Language Association, and has lectured at virtually every leading U.S. university. She is the recipient of two National Science Foundation ADVANCE grants, a Leadership grant in 2005, and a PAID grant in 2011 (with co-PIs Mary Ann Mason and Janet Bandows Koster). Williams’ influential reports on work-family conflict among hourly workers include “One Sick Child Away from Being Fired: When Opting Out is not an Option” (2006), “The Three Faces of Work-Family Conflict: The Poor, the Professionals and the Missing Middle” (with Heather Boushey) (2010), and “Improving Work-Life Fit in Hourly Jobs: An Underused Cost-Cutting Strategy in a Globalizing World” (2011). Her work on second-generation gender bias includes the Gender Bias Learning Project (www.genderbiaslearningproject.com). In addition, Williams has a Huffington Post blog. Concurrent Session 1: What Data Can & Cannot Tell Us? MODERATOR: Alicia Carriquiry is distinguished professor of statistics at Iowa State University. Between January of 2000 and July of 2004 she was associate provost at Iowa State. Her research interests are in Bayesian statistics and general methods. Carriquiry is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. She has served on the executive committees of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and of the American Statistical Association and was a member of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. She is also a past president of the International Society for Bayesian Analysis (ISBA) and a past member of the board of the Plant Sciences Institute at Iowa State University. Carriquiry is editor of The Annals of Applied Statistics and past editor of Bayesian Analysis, and she serves on the editorial boards of several Latin American journals of statistics and mathematics. She has served on several National Academy of Sciences committees. She was a member of the Committee on Gender Differences in the Careers in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Faculty of the National Research Council and is currently a member of the standing Committee on National Statistics 122

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS and of the standing Committee on Evidence for Use in Social Science Policy. Carriquiry received an M.Sc. in animal science from the University of Illinois, and an M.Sc. in statistics and a Ph.D. in statistics and animal genetics from Iowa State University. SPEAKERS: Donna K. Ginther: See biography under Session I: Statistics on the Career Pathways of Women of Color Faculty in Academia: Where We Stand: Commissioned Research. Shulamit Kahn: See biography under Session I: Statistics on the Career Pathways of Women of Color Faculty in Academia: Where We Stand: Commissioned Research. Stephen H. Cohen is currently the chief statistician at the National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. Cohen’s field of study includes design of sample surveys, statistical inference from complex sample surveys, disclosure avoidance techniques, privacy, and informed consent. He received his B.A. in mathematics from Boston University in 1968, his M.S. in mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1970, and finally his Ph.D. in mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1974. Cohen is a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology (FCSM), the FCSM Confidentiality and Data Access Committee, and the FCSM Privacy Committee. Cohen was past chair of the American Statistical Association’s Section of Survey Research Methods. RAPPORTEUR: Trisha Vickrey Concurrent Session 2: Using a Legal Framework Successfully MODERATOR: Joseph M. DeSimone (NAE and NAS member) is Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University. DeSimone has received numerous awards and citations honoring his dedication to advancing diversity in the chemistry Ph.D. workforce, such as the 2010 AAAS Mentor Award, the 2009 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, and the 2009 North Carolina Award, which is the highest honor the State of North Carolina can bestow to recognize notable achievements of North Carolinians in the fields of literature, science, the fine arts, and public service. DeSimone is very much engaged on the topic of future faculty and how institutions support them. DeSimone is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. SPEAKER: Debra Rolison heads the Advanced Electrochemical Materials section at the NRL, where her research focuses on multifunctional nanoarchitectures for such rate-critical applications as catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and sensors. She is also an adjunct professor of chemistry at the University of Utah (2000–present). She was a faculty scholar at Florida Atlantic University (1972–1975) and received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1980). Rolison is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Women in Science, the Materials Research Society, and the American Chemical Society. She received the 2011 ACS Award in the Chemistry of Materials, 123

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS the 2011 Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington, and the 2012 Charles N. Reilley Award of the Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry. Her editorial advisory board service includes Analytical Chemistry, Langmuir, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Advanced Energy Materials, Nano Letters, the Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Annual Review in Analytical Chemistry. When not otherwise bringing the importance of nothing and disorder to materials chemistry, Rolison writes and lectures widely on issues affecting women (and men!) in science, including proposing Title IX assessments of science and engineering departments. She is the author of over 200 articles and holds 24 patents. RAPPORTEUR: Victoria Gunderson Concurrent Session 3: How Does Gender Bias Differ by Race and Ethnicity? MODERATOR: Vivian W. Pinn (IOM member) recently retired as the first full-time director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) in the Office of the Director of NIH, an appointment she held since 1991. She is also the former NIH Associate Director for Research on Women’s Health. She came to NIH from Howard University’s College of Medicine in Washington, DC, where she had been professor and chair of the department of pathology, and she has previously held appointments at Tufts University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School. She has been invited to present the ORWH’s mandate, programs, and initiatives to many national and international organizations with an interest in improving women’s health, the health of minorities, and careers in bioscience for women and minorities. She has received numerous honors, awards, and recognitions and has been granted eleven honorary degrees of laws and science since 1992. She is a past president of the National Medical Association, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She serves as a member of CWSEM and has extensive knowledge of underrepresented minority women in medicine and of federal programs that are relevant to women of color. SPEAKER: Joan C. Williams: See biography under Session III: Minority Women and Multiple Marginality: Gender, Race and Equity in Science Education and Research RAPPORTEUR: Gretchen Stanton Concurrent Session 4: Where Are Women of Color: Contingent & Administrative Positions in Academia? MODERATOR: Anthony DePass is the assistant vice president for research development at Long Island University and an associate professor of biology at its Brooklyn campus. With over 15 years experience in the administration and evaluation of programs aimed at faculty and student development, he is currently principal investigator and director of the Long Island University Minority Biomedical Research Support-Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (MBRS/RISE) program that prepares students from underrepresented populations for doctoral study in the biomedical sciences, co-PI of an NSF-funded NOYCE program for science teacher 124

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS training, and institutional coordinator for an National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Institutional Research and Academic Career Development Award (IRACDA) program that prepares future faculty as teacher/scholars. He cochaired the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Interventions that Encourage Minorities to Pursue Research Careers, and has since been chair or cochair for the four annual conferences on Interventions that Broaden Participation in Research Careers. These conferences serve as venues for the dissemination of scholarship related to interventions research and evaluation, as well as related training activities. DePass is also the lead author on assessment for the recently published “Vision and Change in Undergraduate Education- A Call to Action.” This work was supported by HHMI, NSF, NIH and AAAS and represents the culmination of a multiyear project involving over 200 faculty administrators and stakeholders nationwide, that addresses the needed improvement of biology education to address 21st century challenges. DePass has served on several review panels and advisory committees that focus on the issues related to the underrepresentation of minorities in the scientific workforce. SPEAKER: Cherilynn Reynolds Shadding serves as the outreach director for the Genome Institute, a position she has held since 2006. In this position, she is responsible for designing, implementing, and maintaining genomics education programs for the community at large and for K-12 and undergraduate students that stimulate their interest in careers in genomics-related fields. Through her leadership, Opportunities in Genomics Research (OGR) was launched in 2007. This program seeks to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who obtain Ph.D.’s in the field of genomics/genetics. To date, two programs have been implemented under OGR, Undergraduate Scholars and Extensive Study. Shadding is currently involved in research that seeks to identify the interventions that encourage minority students to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics). Shadding received her B.A. (1995) and M.A. (1998) in biology at Fisk University in Nashville. She attended graduate school at Meharry Medical College, where she earned her Ph.D. (2002) in physiology. Her research focus was cell signaling mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells and how such events may lead to vascular disease. After receiving her Ph.D., she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institute on Aging–National Institutes of Health in Baltimore, M.D., under Rui-Ping Xiao. She conducted research that examined the effects of referfusion/injury; hypoxia and acidosis-induced signaling pathways in cardiomyoctyes. She did a second postdoctoral fellowship under Daniel Link at Washington University in St. Louis in the Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Oncology. She studied angiogenesis and hematopoietic stem cell recruitment to sites of injury in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. RAPPORTEUR: Danielle Haney Concurrent Session 5: Experiences of Women of Color Faculty in STEM MODERATOR: Florence B. Bonner: See biography under Session III: Minority Women and Multiple Marginality: Gender, Race and Equity in Science Education and Research. 125

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS SPEAKER: Sylvia Hurtado: See biography under Session I: Statistics on the Career Pathways of Women of Color Faculty in Academia: Where We Stand: Commissioned Research. RAPPORTEUR: Tanya Figueroa Session V: Supporting Women of Color through Professional Societies MODERATOR: Patrick Valdez serves as the director of college access and success initiatives in the Office for Access and the Advancement of Public Black Universities at the Association of Public and Land Grant Universities, where he is responsible for the development of key initiatives toward improving college access and success for underrepresented minority populations. He is also the staff lead for the rollout of Phase II of the Minority Male STEM Initiative, which will include the publication of several policy briefs and competitively awarded funding to APLU-member institutions to enhance access for minorities in STEM. Valdez has held executive-level positions at St. Edward’s University, the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), and the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU). He has extensive experience in student leadership and career development as well as research focused on the challenges and obstacles facing first-generation parents and college students. His current research focuses on the policy formation of Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) legislation in 1992. Valdez earned a master’s degree in student personnel administration from Teachers College at Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree in international studies from St. Edward’s University. He is a recipient of a Rackham Merit Fellowship from the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE) at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and is currently a doctoral candidate in the higher education administration program at the University of Texas at Austin. SPEAKERS: Judit Camacho has been engaged with SACNAS (Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science) for the last 17 years and has served two terms as executive director. SACNAS is dedicated to fostering the success of Hispanic/Chicano and Native American scientists—from college students to professionals—to attain advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership. A passionate advocate for social change and full involvement of diverse communities in the sciences, Ms. Camacho is proud to lead an organization that was founded nearly 40 years ago by women and men who were the first Chicanas/os or Native Americans in their fields to obtain a doctoral degree. Ms. Camacho first became involved with SACNAS as a student, while pursuing her mathematics degree from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has also completed graduate coursework in public health from Johns Hopkins University. In between her terms at SACNAS, Camacho served for five years with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Division for Minority Opportunities in Research at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and subsequently in the Office of Workforce Development at the National Cancer Institute. Among the projects that she helped craft at NIH were the Summit on Latino Research, Outreach, and Employment at the NIH and the Introduction to Cancer Research Careers Program. As the executive director of SACNAS, Camacho has worked with the SACNAS board of directors to increase and sustain the organization’s partnerships and alliances, strengthen the society’s national profile, promote a 126

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS greater understanding of the necessity for a diverse scientific community within the U.S., and increase underrepresented minority access to the resources and policies that transform the country. Throughout her terms of service at SACNAS, the organization has grown significantly: from a staff of two to a staff of 20; from a budget of $350K to a budget of over $5 million; from a national conference with attendance of over 500 to close to 4,000; and from a conference- driven organization to a society with rich year-round programming including 70 chapters nationwide, regional meetings, leadership development institutes & initiatives, and a significant national science policy/advocacy presence. In December 2011, Camacho was honored by the White House as a “Champion for Change” in recognition of her contributions to advancing women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In July 2012, Camacho and her family will move to Guadalajara, Mexico. Her goal is to build educational bridges between Mexico and the United States through scholarship and community development. Marian Johnson-Thompson is professor emerita of biology and environmental sciences at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) in Washington, DC and adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at the University of NC-Chapel Hill. A cancer researcher, microbiologist and educator, she is also a leader in several professional and civic organizations. Her career began in 1971 at the University of the District of Columbia where she was initially appointed instructor and moved up the academic ranks to professor. She joined the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) of the National Institutes of Health in 1992 and retired as director of education and biomedical research development in 2008. Prior to that, she also held temporary and sabbatical positions at Goddard Space Flight Center, Lawrence Livermore, General Electric Space Science Center, the National Cancer Institute, NIH and Georgetown University Pharmacology Department (adjunct professor) and Howard University. As a member of several local, national, and international committees and advisory boards that address her professional interests, Johnson-Thompson is frequently invited to address issues related to science equity, health disparities, environmental justice, and human subjects protection. She has served as a reviewer/consultant for the NIH, NSF, EPA, Homeland Security, the Burroughs Welcome Fund, DOD, and NASA; and she serves on the board of the NC Triangle Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the NC Environmental Defense Fund and the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer. She is a founding member of the National Network of Minority Women in Science. Previously, she served on the Durham, NC, Environmental Affairs Board and she is a Golden Life Member of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. Her active memberships include the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), where she chairs the Committee on Microbiological Issues Impacting Minorities and serves on ASM’s Public and Scientific Affairs Board, the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Society for Cell Biology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society of Sigma Xi and she is a member of Susan G. Komen for the Cure Advocates in Science. Her awards and honors are many and include the 1999 ONI Award from the International Congress of Black Women, the ASM’s Alice Evans Award for her major contributions toward the full participation and advancement of women in microbiology, several NIEHS and NIH Director’s Awards, and the 2003 Thurgood Marshall Alumni Award. She was named Meyerhoff Mentor of the Year at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Johnson-Thompson received B.S. and M.S. degrees in microbiology from Howard University and a Ph.D. in molecular virology from Georgetown University 127

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS Medical School. In 2009, she was honored by her alma mater and awarded the Outstanding Alumni Achievement Award from Howard University. Suzanne Bennett Johnson is a distinguished research professor at Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine and 2012 president of the American Psychological Association. She received her B.A. in psychology from Cornell University and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from SUNY at Stony Brook. She is licensed to practice in Florida and is board certified in Clinical Health Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology. From 2002- 2010, she served as the first chair of the Department of Medical Humanities and Social Sciences at FSU College of Medicine in Tallahassee. Prior to that time, she was a distinguished professor and director of the Center for Pediatric Psychology and Family Studies at the University of Florida Health Science Center in Gainesville. From 2001-2002, she was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow working in the office of Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton. Johnson has numerous publications in the areas of pediatric psychology and clinical health psychology and has received many research, teaching, and service awards. She is considered an expert in the areas of medical regimen adherence, behavioral aspects of childhood diabetes, pediatric obesity, and the psychological impact of genetic screening on children and families. She has over 30 years of continuous research funding from the National Institutes of Health, including a Research Career Development Award. Linette M. Watkins is an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Texas State University–San Marcos. She received her B.S. degree in biochemistry from Trinity University (1989) and her Ph.D. in biochemistry from University of Notre Dame (1996). After completing a postdoctoral appointment at Texas A&M University, she joined the faculty at Texas State in 1997. Her research focuses on understanding the mechanism of enzymes involved in the novel degradation pathways. She is actively involved in promoting early involvement of students in undergraduate research and using undergraduate research as a tool for the recruitment and retention of underrepresented students in the chemical sciences. Over the last fifteen years at Texas State, she has mentored over 90 students. She is an active member of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and has served in leadership roles in ACS local sections, divisions, and national committees. She was the chair of the ACS Committee on Minority Affairs from 2006- 2008 and has served on the steering committee for the ACS Women Chemists of Color Program since its inception in 2010. June 8, 2012 Welcome Lauren Maxim Van Wazer is assistant director for cyber security in the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House. Van Wazer was associate chief and special counsel for the Office of Engineering and Technology of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) since 2001. In that role, she helped develop and implement wireless broadband, spectrum, homeland security, and telecommunications technology policy and was the principal FCC liaison to the wireless Internet service provider community. Also, she has held positions within the FCC as codirector of the Wireless Broadband Access Task Force, FCC negotiator for Wi-Fi issues as part of the US delegation to the 2003 World Radiocommunications Conference, and press officer 128

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS on telecommunications technology policy. Prior to joining the FCC, Van Wazer was an associate with the law firm of Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. and a law clerk to Judge Ralph B. Guy, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. She also worked as an engineer for several years in various management positions in the Network Services Department of AT&T in Oakton, Va. Van Wazer received her Juris Doctor, magna cum laude, from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C., where she was an editor of The Georgetown Law Journal and a member of the Order of the Coif. She is also a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering in Philadelphia, where she received a B.S.E. in systems science engineering. Session VI: Impact of Federal Agencies MODERATOR: Bernadette Gray-Little has been the chancellor of the University of Kansas since August 15, 2009. Gray-Little previously was executive vice chancellor and provost from 2006 to 2009 at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. A professor of psychology, she rose to the post of UNC's chief academic officer after successive administrative appointments, including dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. While at UNC, she earned a reputation as a champion for the highest quality educational experience for students and a strong advocate for faculty and for research. A native of eastern North Carolina, Gray-Little received her bachelor's degree from Marywood College in Scranton, Pa., and her master's and doctoral degrees in psychology from Saint Louis University. She earned a Fulbright Fellowship to study in Denmark. She also served as a Social Science Research Council Fellow and received a Ford Foundation Senior Scholar Fellowship through the National Research Council. SPEAKERS: Jeri L. Buchholz became NASA's chief human capital officer and assistant administrator for human capital management on Aug. 1, 2011. In these positions, Buchholz has stewardship responsibility for NASA's workforce. She advises and assists the administrator by carrying out responsibilities in accordance with the Chief Human Capital Officers Act of 2002. Her responsibilities include setting the agency's workforce development strategy; assessing workforce characteristics and future needs based on the agency's mission and strategic plan; aligning the agency's human resources policies and programs with organizational mission, strategic goals, and performance outcomes; and serving as a member of the Office of Personnel Management-led Chief Human Capital Officers Council. Buchholz served as the associate director for human resources operations and policy at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. She began her public service career in 1981 as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. She also has served as the chief human capital officer at the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General, as well as the U.S. International Trade Commission. In addition, she has held positions at the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the U.S. Information Agency, and the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Muriel Poston is currently serving as the division director for the Human Resource Division in the Education Directorate at the National Science Foundation and is a professor in the biology 129

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS department at Skidmore College. She joined the Skidmore College administration in 2005 as dean of the faculty and until her recent appointment at NSF. At Skidmore she worked with colleagues to re-envision the science program, supported efforts to broaden the participation of underrepresented students and faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines, and sought to enhance the capacity and infrastructure of the STEM facilities. Her primary research interests are in plant systematics, especially the evolutionary relationships of the neotropical family Loasaceae. Prior to her appointment at Skidmore, Poston spent over twenty years as a professor in the department of biology/botany at Howard, where she focused on undergraduate education, served as curator of the university herbarium, and worked to develop the environmental science program. Poston previously served as a program director and deputy division director in the Biological Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation (NSF), where she was responsible for programs to enhance infrastructure for biological research collections, research instrumentation, and field station facilities. She recently stepped down as the chair of the congressionally mandated Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering and as a member of the NSF Advisory Committee for the Biological Sciences Directorate. She also served as a member of the National Research Council’s Board of Life Sciences. Poston currently sits on the board of directors of the American Institute of Biological Sciences and the advisory committee of Project Kaleidoscope. Poston earned a B.A. degree from Stanford University, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a J.D. degree from the University of Maryland. Janine A. Clayton is the acting director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health in the Office of the Director at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. She is the author of over 70 scientific publications, journal articles, and book chapters. Prior to joining the Office of Research on Women’s Health, she was the deputy clinical director of the National Eye Institute (NEI) at NIH. A board-certified ophthalmologist, Clayton’s research interests include autoimmune ocular diseases and the role of sex and gender in health and disease. Clayton has a particular interest in ocular surface disease and discovered a novel form of disease associated with premature ovarian insufficiency which affects young women. Clayton is a native Washingtonian and received her undergraduate degree with honors from the Johns Hopkins University and her M.D. from Howard University College of Medicine. She completed a residency in ophthalmology at the Medical College of Virginia and fellowship training in cornea and external disease at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital and in uveitis and ocular immunology at the NEI. Clayton has been an attending physician and clinical investigator in cornea and uveitis at the NEI since 1996, conducting research on inflammatory diseases of the anterior segment and providing medical and surgical uveitis fellowship training. Her clinical research has ranged from randomized controlled trials of novel therapies for immune-mediated ocular diseases to studies on the development of digital imaging techniques for the anterior segment. Clayton has received several awards from NIH and has been recognized as a leader by her peers. She received the Senior Achievement Award in from the board of trustees of the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) in 2008, and was selected as a 2010 Silver Fellow by the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in recognition of “accomplishments, leadership and contributions to the Association to help further ARVO’s mission to facilitate the advancement of vision research and the prevention and cure of disorders of the visual system worldwide.” Clayton has served on critical committees at the NIH Clinical Center and currently serves on the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Panel for 130

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS Ophthalmic Devices, the executive committee of the Women’s Eye Health.Org, the medical and scientific advisory board of Tissue Banks International, and the editorial boards of The Ocular Surface and Oral Diseases. Clayton was named deputy director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health and the Office of the Director at the National Institutes of Health in June 2008. In September 2011, Clayton was appointed acting director of the Office on Research on Women’s Health and serves, along with the NIH Director, as cochair of the NIH Working Group on Women in Biomedical Careers. James H. Johnson, Jr. is the director of the National Center for Environmental Research (NCER) in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD). In this role, Johnson continues a life-long career dedicated to sustaining and advancing scientific research and education initiatives supporting environmental protection, quality of life programs and policies, and environmental workforce development. Johnson has served on numerous committees and boards for the National Academies, EPA, and academic institutions. He is a member of the Anne Arundel Community College (MD) board of trustees and is the professor emeritus of civil engineering and dean emeritus of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences at Howard University. Johnson earned his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Howard University, Master of Science from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. in applied sciences from the University of Delaware. He is the 2005 recipient of the National Society of Black Engineers’ Lifetime Achievement Award in Academia and the 2008 Water Environment Federation Gordon Maskew Fair Award. His research interests include the treatment and disposal of hazardous substances, the use of nanomaterials for environmental restoration, the evaluation of environmental policy issues in relation to minorities, and the development of environmental curricula and strategies to increase the pool of underrepresented groups in STEM disciplines. Session VII: Successful Practices and Strategies for Institutional Transformation MODERATOR: Kelly Mack is a professor of biology at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, where she has taught courses in physiology and endocrinology for 15 years, and she is on loan from her home institution (since fall 2008) serving as a program director for the National Science Foundation ADVANCE Program. At her home institution, Mack served in many capacities, including biology program director, where she was responsible for providing leadership and strategic vision for the intellectual, educational, and professional development of biology majors and for the coordination of faculty in providing quality instruction, research, and development activities. During her tenure at UMES, Mack served as principal investigator, director, or co-director for externally funded projects that totaled over $12 million dollars, including the UMES ADVANCE Program, which focused on issues related to African American women faculty in the STEM disciplines and led to the initiation of several institution wide practices to promote the professional development of all faculty. Kelly Mack received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, in biology and later her Ph.D. from Howard University in physiology. Mack has had extensive training and experience in the area of cancer research, with her research efforts focusing primarily on the use of novel antitumor agents in human estrogen receptor negative breast tumor cells. Specifically, these efforts have included the role of the cellular accumulation of cisplatin in breast tumor cells, and the use of 131

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS demethyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase agents in inducing the re-expression of the estrogen receptor in human breast tumor cells. More recently, her research focus has involved the use of bioflavonoids in the regulation of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast tumor cell proliferation. Mack has served as a member of the board of governors for the National Council on Undergraduate Research and is a current member of the National Institutes of Health Review Subcommittee for the Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) Division. SPEAKERS: Loretta A. Moore currently serves as interim associate dean for the College of Science, Engineering and Technology at Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi. She is a professor and previously served as chair of the Department of Computer Science. She has held positions at Auburn University, AT&T Bell Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Army Research Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Moore has worked in a variety of computer science areas with an emphasis on the design of intelligent systems. Her current research is in the area of computational thinking and in the application of intelligent techniques to visual analytics, cybersecurity, and visualization. She has received funding from agencies including the National Science Foundation, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Justice, Department of Energy – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Army Research Laboratory, NASA Kennedy Space Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA Headquarters, and Jacobs Technology. Moore is the principal investigator on a recent grant from the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE program, which is aimed at advancing the careers of female faculty in the STEM and SBS disciplines and transforming the institution’s climate to promote opportunities for the advancement of all faculty. She serves as a commissioner for the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. Moore is a member of the board of the Association of Departments of Computing at Minority Institutions (ADMI); the US Army Science Board; and ACM, IEEE, and AAUW organizations. She is active in the recruitment, retention, and promotion of African- American Computer Scientists. Moore received her B.S. degree in computer science from Jackson State University and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the Illinois Institute of Technology. J. Wayne Jones is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. He is the associate director for the University of Michigan’s ADVANCE program. He holds a Ph.D. in materials science from Vanderbilt University. His research interests focus on developing an understanding of structure-property relationships in advanced structural materials for automotive and aerospace applications. His work has centered on the fatigue and creep behavior of aluminum alloys, particulate strengthened aluminum matrix composites, titanium and titanium aluminides, and more recently on new magnesium alloys. His research group is currently focusing on development of new instrumentation and techniques for studying the fatigue behavior of structural materials in the very high cycle fatigue regime using ultrasonic fatigue. He served as associate dean for undergraduate education in the College of Engineering from 1996 to 2001 and he served as interim chair of MSE in 1992. He served as president of TMS (a 12,000 member materials society) in 1999 and has served on the boards of directors of TMS and the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers. He was elected a fellow of ASM International (a 50,000-member materials society) in 2000. In 2007 he received the 132

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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHIES OF SPEAKERS Harold H. Johnson Diversity Award from the University of Michigan. In 2010 he received ASM International’s Alfred Easton White Distinguished Teacher Award, the society’s highest honor for materials science teaching excellence. In 2011 he and his co-authors were awarded the Champion H. Mathewson Medal for “Microstructural Influences on Very-High-Cycle Fatigue- Crack Initiation in Ti-6246,” published in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A, in 2008. Joan Y. Reede was appointed as the first dean for diversity and community partnership at Harvard Medical School (HMS) in January 2002. She is responsible for the development and management of a comprehensive program that provides leadership, guidance, and support to promote the increased recruitment, retention, and advancement of underrepresented minority faculty at HMS. In 1990, Reede founded the HMS Minority Faculty Development Program and currently also serves as faculty director of its Community Outreach Programs. In 2008, she became the director of the Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity. In addition, Reede holds the appointments of associate professor of medicine at HMS, associate professor of society, human development, and health at the Harvard School of Public Health, and assistant in health policy at Massachusetts General Hospital. Over the past 20 years, Reede created and developed more than 20 programs at HMS that aim to address pipeline and leadership issues for minorities and women who are interested in careers in medicine, academic and scientific research, and the healthcare professions. Prior to coming to HMS in 1989, Reede served as the medical director for a Boston community health center and for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Department of Youth Services. She has also worked as a pediatrician in community and academic health centers, juvenile prisons, and public schools. Reede has received many awards. The diversity of these honors is a reflection of her far-reaching and varied accomplishments. At the national level, Reede was appointed to the Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Minority Health by Donna E. Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services, and she served on the board of governors for the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center; the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Council; the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society at the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and as a commissioner of the Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce. Reede formerly served on the Secretary’s Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH and is currently on the Sullivan Alliance to Transform America’s Health Professions. Reede is a member of the Education Board of the American Public Health Association, serves on the National Advisory Board of the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at Morehouse School of Medicine and the board of directors of the National Hispanic Medical Association, and in 2009 was appointed to the Health Research & Trust board of directors of the American Hospital Association. In 2007, Reede was voted to membership in the Medical Administrators Conference. She presently serves on the National Children’s Study Advisory Committee of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Reede was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 2009, and she is the recipient of the 2011 Diversity Award from the Association of Professors of Medicine. Reede graduated from Brown University and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She completed her pediatric residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, and a fellowship in child psychiatry at Children’s Hospital Boston. She holds an M.P.H. and a M.S. in Health Policy and Management from Harvard School of Public Health, and an M.B.A. from Boston University. 133

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SEEKING SOLUTIONS Closing Session: Next Steps SPEAKER: Shirley Malcom (NAS member) is head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The directorate includes AAAS programs in education, activities for underrepresented groups, and public understanding of science and technology. Malcom serves on several boards—including the Heinz Endowments and the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment—and is an honorary trustee of the American Museum of Natural History. In 2006 she was named as cochair of the National Science Board Commission on 21st Century Education in STEM. She serves as a regent of Morgan State University and as a trustee of Caltech. In addition, she has chaired a number of national committees addressing education reform and access to scientific and technical education, careers and literacy. Malcom is a former trustee of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. She is a fellow of the AAAS and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She served on the National Science Board, the policymaking body of the National Science Foundation, from 1994 to 1998, and from 1994 to 2001 served on the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. Malcom received her doctorate in ecology from Pennsylvania State University; master’s degree in zoology from the University of California, Los Angeles; and bachelor’s degree with distinction in zoology from the University of Washington. She also holds 15 honorary degrees. In 2003 Malcom received the Public Welfare Medal of the National Academy of Sciences, the highest award given by the Academy. 134