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will be a series of professional development summits that are both discipline-specific and multidisciplinary. The broader impact of this effort will be seen in enhanced understanding of the factors contributing to the retention and advancement of women engineering faculty and in improved research and professional networks among a highly trained group of faculty who are often isolated in their professional settings in academic departments.
Source: http://nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0545269

(ii) ADVANCE Partnerships for Adaption, Implementation, and Dissemination (PAID) Award: Developing Diverse Department (3-D) at NC State; Marcia Gumpertz (Principal Investigator)

“Developing Diverse Departments (3-D) at NC State” is designed to adopt/adapt a companion set of ADVANCE initiatives in order to address implicit biases and rarely articulated cultural stereotypes held within the university. Project goals are: (1) to increase the number of women and faculty of color in the professoriate, (2) to create a climate that promotes the success of all faculty, and (3) to eliminate factors that elevate women's and ethnic minorities' risk of leaving NCSU faculty positions.
Source: http://nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0820013

References:

DeCuir-Gunby, J. T., Long-Mitchell, L., & Grant, C. (2009). The emotionality of being women professors of color in engineering: A critical race theory and critical race feminism perspective. In P. A. Schutz & M. Zembylas (Eds), Advances in teacher emotion research: The impact on teachers’ lives. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Leggon, C. (2001). African American and Hispanic Women in Science and Engineering, Making Strides, 3 (3), 7.

National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, & Institute of Medicine. (2006). Biological, social, and organizational components of success for women in academic science and engineering: Report of a workshop. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.

National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. (2007). Beyond bias and barriers: Fulfilling the potential of women in academic science and engineering. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

National Research Council. (2006). To recruit and advance: Women students and faculty in science and engineering. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.

National Science Board (2004). Broadening participation in science and engineering faculty. Arlington, VA: National Science Foundation (NSB-0441). Retrieved from the World Wide Web: www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsb0441/nsb0441.pdf

Nelson, D. (2007). A national analysis of minorities in science and engineering faculties at research universities. Retrieved December 8, 2008 from http://cheminfo.ou.edu/~djn/diversity/Faculty_Tables_FY07/07Report.pdf

Nelson, D. J., & Rogers, D. C. (2005). A national analysis of diversity in science and engineering faculties at research universities. Norman, OK. January, 2005. Retrieved from the World Wide Web: http://cheminfo.chem.ou.edu/~djn/diversity/briefings/Diversitypercent20Reportpercent20Final.pdf

Trower, C. A. , Chait, R. P. , “Faculty Diversity.” Harvard Magazine, (March-April 2002)

 



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