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Study Committee Biographical Information Sue McNeil, Chair, is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and of Public Policy and Administration at the University of Delaware (UD). She is also Director of UD’s University Transportation Center and former Director of its Disaster Research Center. Dr. McNeil was formerly a Professor in the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, a Profes- sor of Civil and Materials Engineering, and Director of the Urban Trans- portation Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Before joining UIC, she was a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineer- ing and of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research and teaching interests include transportation infrastructure management (with emphasis on the application of advanced technolo- gies), economic analysis, analytical methods, and computer applications. Dr. McNeil is a former member of the TRB Executive Committee and the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Infrastructure and the Con- structed Environment. She served on the NRC committees on Review of the National Transportation Science and Technology Strategy and on Study of the Regulation of Weights, Lengths, and Widths of Commercial Motor Vehicles, and she chaired the TRB Committee on Transportation Asset Management from 2004 to 2010. She is a founding Associate Edi- tor of the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Journal of Infrastructure Systems, and currently serves as its Editor-in-Chief. Dr. McNeil earned bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and civil engineering from the Uni- versity of Newcastle, Australia, and an MS and PhD in civil engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. William L. Ball retired from General Motors (GM) in 2009 after 25 years with the company. At the time of his retirement, he was Vice President, 159

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160 Framing Surface Transportation Research for the Nation’s Future Public Policy, of OnStar LLC, GM’s in-vehicle wireless communica- tion service, which includes automatic crash notification and remotely initiated slowdown of stolen vehicles. His responsibilities included leading all aspects of OnStar’s public policy at the state and federal levels. Mr. Ball was previously Director, Strategic Planning and Program Management, of the GM Advanced Technology Vehicles Group, work- ing with the group’s executive director to create strategic options for investment in advanced alternative-propulsion vehicles. In this position, he assisted in leading the successful negotiation and implementation of the GM–Toyota Collaboration for Advanced Technology Partnership; he also cochaired the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas, deliver- ing congressional testimony on the trade association’s behalf. Mr. Ball has served on two expert panels convened by the U.S. Centers for Dis- ease Control and Prevention, and on the Board of Directors of the COMCARE Emergency Response Alliance. His awards include the Friends of EMS [emergency medical services] Award from the National Association of EMS Physicians in 2010, and Chairman’s Honors from GM in 1997 and 2005. Mr. Ball earned a BChemE degree from the University of Minnesota, an MBA from Stanford University, and a JD from the University of Minnesota. Irwin Feller is an Emeritus Professor of Economics at Pennsylvania State University, where he served on the faculty for 39 years, including 24 years as Director of the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation. Currently he is a Senior Visiting Scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, where his research interests include the economics of science and technology, the evaluation of federal and state technology programs, the university’s role in technology-based economic development, and the adoption and impacts of performance measurement systems. Dr. Feller has served on various National Research Council committees, including the Research and Technology Coordinating Com- mittee and the Committee on the Review of the U.S. DOT Strategic Plan for Research, Development, and Technology. He also chaired the Com- mittee on Assessing Behavioral and Social Science Research on Aging and coedited its final report, A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging (2007). He is a National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Feller earned a BBA degree in economics from

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Study Committee Biographical Information 161 the City University of New York and a PhD from the University of Minnesota, also in economics. Robert E. Gallamore is a railroad expert known nationally for his contri- butions to economic, operational, managerial, and policy studies of the industry. He retired in 2006 from his positions as Director of the Trans- portation Center and Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences in the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern Univer- sity. Before joining the university in 2001, Dr. Gallamore was on execu- tive loan from Union Pacific Railroad to the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., in Pueblo, Colorado, where he was Assistant Vice President for Communications Technologies and General Manager of the North American Joint Positive Train Control Program. He has also served in several positions with the federal government; as Deputy Federal Rail- road Administrator in the Carter administration, he led the executive branch’s development of recommendations for railroad deregulation and revitalization. Dr. Gallamore chairs the National Research Council (NRC) Committee for Review of the Federal Railroad Administration Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. He also chaired the Committee for the Study of the Feasibility of a Hazardous Materi- als Transportation Cooperative Research Program and the Committee on Freight Transportation Information Systems Security. He has been a member of a number of other NRC committees, and is a National Asso- ciate of the National Academies. He is currently coauthoring a book on the economic history of and public policy toward the American railroad industry during the 20th century. Dr. Gallamore earned an AB degree from Wesleyan University, and an MA in public administration and a PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University. Genevieve Giuliano is a Professor, Senior Associate Dean for Research and Technology, and Margaret and John Ferraro Chair in Effective Local Government at the University of Southern California’s Sol Price School of Public Policy. She is also Director of the METRANS Transportation Center, a joint partnership of the University of Southern California and California State University, Long Beach. Her research interests include land use and transportation, transportation policy analysis, and infor- mation technology applications in transportation. Dr. Giuliano is a

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162 Framing Surface Transportation Research for the Nation’s Future former chair of the TRB Executive Committee. She has served on vari- ous National Research Council committees and chaired the Committee for the Study of Funding Options for Freight Transportation Projects of National Significance. She was named a National Associate of the National Academies in 2003; received the 2005 TRB W. N. Carey, Jr., Award for Distinguished Service; was awarded the Deen Lectureship in 2007; and received the Transportation Research Forum’s Outstanding Transportation Researcher Award in 2012. She serves on the editorial boards of Research in Transportation Business and Management and the Journal of Transport Policy. Dr. Giuliano earned a BA degree in history from the University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD in social science from the University of California, Irvine. David L. Huft is a Research Program Manager and Intelligent-Transpor- tation Systems Coordinator in the South Dakota Department of Trans- portation’s Office of Research, which addresses a broad range of research topics in transportation design, construction, operations, maintenance, planning, administration, and market research. Active in national research activities, Mr. Huft is a past Chair of the Research Advisory Committee of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Offi- cials (AASHTO); he cochaired the 2008 scanning study of Europe and Asia, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration, AASHTO, and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP), which reviewed transportation research program administration practices; and he is a former member of the AASHTO Standing Committee on Research. Mr. Huft served on the National Research Council Committee for Research on Improved Concrete Pavement for Federal Aid Highways, chaired the TRB Committee on Highway Traffic Monitoring, and was a member of the TRB Steering Committee for the Conference on Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Technologies for Transportation. Currently, he chairs the NCHRP Project Panel on Long-Range Strategic Issues Affecting Pres- ervation, Maintenance, and Renewal of Highway Infrastructure. Mr. Huft is a recipient of the 2009 TRB W. N. Carey, Jr., Award for Distinguished Service and of two AASHTO awards: the President’s Award for Research and the Alfred E. Johnson Award for Outstanding Achievement. He is also a member of South Dakota’s Transportation Hall of Honor. He earned a BS degree in physics from Michigan State University.

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Study Committee Biographical Information 163 Dennis C. Judycki retired from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) in 2008. During his career with FHWA, he served in a num- ber of senior executive positions, including Associate Administrator for Safety and System Applications. At the time of his retirement, he was Associate Administrator for Research, Development, and Technol- ogy, and Director of the Turner–Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, Virginia. In these positions he was responsible for leadership in developing and coordinating national research and technology part- nerships; in facilitating corporate coordination for the delivery of tech- nology and innovation; and in directing the formulation, conduct, and evaluation of research and development. Mr. Judycki served as the U.S. Department of Transportation’s delegate to the Board of Directors of the ITS World Congress and was the U.S. delegate to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development–European Council of Minis- ters of Transport’s Joint Transport Research Committee. He also served as liaison representative to the National Research Council Research and Technology Coordinating Committee. Mr. Judycki’s awards include the Presidential Distinguished Senior Executive Rank Award in 1998 and TRB’s Roy W. Crum Distinguished Service Award in 2008. Following his retirement from FHWA, he became president and general manager of the Red River Ski Area in New Mexico. Mr. Judycki earned a BS degree in civil engineering from New England College, New Hampshire, and an MSCE, with a specialty in urban transportation planning and traffic operations, from West Virginia University. Tschangho John Kim is Endowed Professor Emeritus of Urban and Regional Systems at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (UIUC) and a Senior Research Fellow at the Engineering Research Insti- tute of Seoul National University, South Korea. Dr. Kim has also worked in Austria, Germany, Indonesia, Kenya, the People’s Republic of China, Saudi Arabia, and Sweden. From 1979 to 1980, he served as Project Direc- tor of the National Comprehensive Transportation Study of Korea, spon- sored by the World Bank, and from 1990 to 1991 he directed the Optimal Transport Sector Development Project in Indonesia. He was Associate Director for International Programs and Studies and was Director of the Office of Overseas University Collaboration at UIUC from 1984 to 1991; he was also special advisor on international affairs to the Governor

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164 Framing Surface Transportation Research for the Nation’s Future of Illinois from 1985 to 1987. More recently, Dr. Kim led a number of technical committees for geographic information systems and intelligent transportation systems of the International Organization for Standard- ization, and he served as president of the Western Regional Science Asso- ciation and as a member of the Boards of Directors of the Korea–USA Science Cooperation Center and the Fulbright Academy of Science and Technology. He is currently a Planning Advisor to the Arriyadh Devel- opment Authority of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Dr. Kim is a member of the editorial boards of 11 international journals and of the review board of the European Research Council. His publications include eight books, 33 book chapters, and more than a hundred journal or professional articles. He earned a BS degree in engineering from Hanyang University in Seoul, South Korea; an MCP from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York; and a PhD in urban planning from Princeton University. Laurie G. McGinnis is Director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Transportation Studies (CTS). Her previous positions at CTS include Research Coordinator, Director of Research and Contract Management, Associate Director, and Acting Director. In these roles, Ms. McGinnis has been a key player in the development and growth of CTS over the last 20 years; her activities have included identifying program oppor- tunities, securing funding, directing programs, guiding program deliv- ery, overseeing center operations, and establishing future directions in transportation research, education, and outreach. Before coming to the University of Minnesota, she was a Project Manager at HNTB (an architectural and engineering firm), where she participated in the design of several bridges for state and local agencies. Ms. McGinnis serves as Chair of TRB’s Research and Education Section, and she chaired the TRB Committee on Conduct of Research from 2003 to 2009. She par- ticipated in the 2008 scanning study of Europe and Asia, sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program, which reviewed transportation research program administration practices. Ms. McGinnis earned a BS degree in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin and master’s degrees in public affairs and business administration from the University of Minnesota.

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Study Committee Biographical Information 165 Herbert H. Richardson is Director Emeritus of the Texas Transportation Institute (TTI), the largest university-affiliated transportation research entity in the United States. A member of the Texas A&M University System, TTI works with nearly 200 sponsors from all levels of govern- ment and from the private sector to address challenges facing virtually all modes of transportation. TTI is also the largest participant in the Texas Department of Transportation’s research program. Dr. Richard- son served as Director of TTI from 1993 to 2006, during which time he also was Associate Vice Chancellor for Engineering of the Texas A&M University System and Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has been a con- sultant to a wide range of organizations, including Caterpillar Tractor Co., Foster-Miller Inc., the International Union of Teamsters, Skychefs Inc., and the U.S. Department of Transportation. Dr. Richardson, whose professional interests include dynamics, control systems, systems engi- neering, and fluid mechanics, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1980 in recognition of his leadership in trans- portation research and his contributions to systems–dynamics educa- tion in mechanical engineering. A former Chair of the TRB Executive Committee, he has also participated in numerous NAE and National Research Council (NRC) activities; he served on the Executive Commit- tee of the NAE Council, on the Governing Board of the NRC, and on a wide variety of NRC study committees. He is a National Associate of the National Academies and received the 2006 TRB Roy W. Crum Award for Distinguished Service. Dr. Richardson earned BS, MS, and ScD degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT. Peter F. Sweatman is Director of the University of Michigan Trans- portation Research Institute (UMTRI). His areas of expertise include accident investigation and analysis, freight efficiency and productivity, intelligent transportation systems (ITS), performance-based standards, vehicle–infrastructure interaction, and research leadership. He is cur- rently helping to develop new research fields for assisting the transition from today’s automotive industry to the transportation industries of the future. In 2013, the University of Michigan launched the Michi- gan Mobility Transformation Center under Dr. Sweatman’s leadership. Before joining UMTRI in 2004, Dr. Sweatman held various positions in

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166 Framing Surface Transportation Research for the Nation’s Future transportation research and development in Australia. He was founder and Managing Director of Roaduser Systems Pty., Ltd.; Chief Scientist at the Australian Road Research Board; and Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Dr. Sweatman served on the Committee on the Review of the U.S. DOT [U.S. Department of Transportation] Strategic Plan for R&D and on the Committee for a Study of Supply and Demand for Highway Safety Professionals in the Public Sector. He served as a member of U.S. DOT’s ITS Advisory Committee and as Chair of the ITS America Board of Directors during 2012 and 2013. He was elected in 1997 to the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, and in 2002 he was awarded the Centenary Medal by the Prime Minister of Australia for service to Australian society in transportation engineering. Dr. Sweatman was named Australian Freight-Industry Personality of the Year in 2004. He earned BE and PhD degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Melbourne. Nigel H. M. Wilson is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineer- ing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a position he has held since 1982. His research and teaching concentrate on urban public transportation, including topics related to the operation, analy- sis, planning, and management of transit systems. Dr. Wilson directs major long-term research and education programs involving collabo- rations between MIT and three transport agencies: Transport for Lon- don, Diputación Foral de Gipuzkoa in Spain, and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. From 1994 to 2003 he was the lead fac- ulty member on a collaboration between MIT, the University of Puerto Rico, and the Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority that focused on Tren Urbano, the new urban rail system in San Juan. During sabbatical leaves from MIT he has worked directly in three large tran- sit agencies (the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, London Transport, and Metro Transit in Minnesota), and he has served as a consultant to a number of other North American transit authorities. Dr. Wilson is a former member of the National Research Council’s Tran- sit Research Analysis Committee and also served on the Committee for a Study of Contracting Out Transit Services and the Committee for a Stra- tegic Transportation Research Study, Transit. He chaired the TRB Com- mittee on Transit Management and Performance for six years and has

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Study Committee Biographical Information 167 served on various Transit Cooperative Research Program panels. He has been a member of the editorial advisory boards of Transportation Research Part B: Methodological and the UITP Revue, a journal of the International Association of Public Transport. Dr. Wilson earned a BS degree in civil engineering from Imperial College, University of London; an SM in civil engineering from MIT; and a PhD in transportation systems from MIT.