Appendix

Biographies of Committee Members

Dr. Margaret A. Honey
New York Hall of Science

Margaret Honey, chair, is president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science, where she is interested in the role of design-based learning in promoting student interest and achievement in STEM subjects. Before joining the museum in November 2008, she was vice president of the Education Development Center (EDC) and director of its Center for Children and Technology. During her 15 years at EDC, she was the architect and overseer of numerous large-scale projects funded by the National Science Foundation, Institute for Education Sciences, Carnegie Corporation, Library of Congress, US Department of Education, and US Department of Energy. She also codirected the Regional Educational Laboratory–Northeast and Islands, helping educators, policymakers, and communities improve schools by leveraging research findings about learning and K–12 education.

Dr. Honey is widely recognized for using digital technologies to support children’s learning in the STEM disciplines. Her work has shaped thinking about learning and technology with special attention to traditionally underserved audiences. She has led some of the country’s most innovative and successful education research, focusing on efforts to identify teaching practices and assessments for 21st century skills; new approaches to teaching computational science in high schools; collaborations with PBS,



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Appendix Biographies of Committee Members Dr. Margaret A. Honey New York Hall of Science Margaret Honey, chair, is president and CEO of the New York Hall of Sci- ence, where she is interested in the role of design-based learning in pro- moting student interest and achievement in STEM subjects. Before joining the museum in November 2008, she was vice president of the Education Development Center (EDC) and director of its Center for Children and Technology. During her 15 years at EDC, she was the architect and overseer of numerous large-scale projects funded by the National Science Founda- tion, Institute for Education Sciences, Carnegie Corporation, Library of Congress, US Department of Education, and US Department of Energy. She also codirected the Regional Educational Laboratory–Northeast and Islands, helping educators, policymakers, and communities improve schools by leveraging research findings about learning and K–12 education. Dr. Honey is widely recognized for using digital technologies to sup- port children’s learning in the STEM disciplines. Her work has shaped thinking about learning and technology with special attention to tradi- tionally underserved audiences. She has led some of the country’s most innovative and successful education research, focusing on efforts to identify teaching practices and assessments for 21st century skills; new approaches to teaching computational science in high schools; collaborations with PBS, 155

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156 STEM INTEGRATION IN K–12 EDUCATION CPB, and national public television stations; investigations of data-driven decision-making tools and practices; and, with colleagues at Bank Street College of Education, the creation of one of the first Internet-based profes- sional development programs in the country. Dr. Honey has shared what she’s learned before Congress, state legis- latures, and federal panels and in numerous articles, chapters, and books. She is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Science Education, chaired an NRC1 workshop that resulted in the report IT Flu- ency and High School Graduation Outcomes, and coedited Learning Science: Computer Games, Simulations, and Education. Her 2013 book Design, Make, Play: Growing the Next Generation of STEM Innovators (coedited with David Kanter) explores the potential of these strategies for supporting student engagement and deeper learning. She is a graduate of Hampshire College and earned her doctorate in developmental psychology from Columbia University. Dr. Linda M. Abriola Tufts University Linda Abriola is dean of the School of Engineering at Tufts University as well as professor of civil and environmental engineering and adjunct professor in chemical and biological engineering. She is a member of both the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Before her appointment at Tufts, she was the Horace Williams King Collegiate Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the integration of mathematical model- ing and laboratory experiments for the investigation and prediction of the transport and fate of reactive contaminants in the subsurface. An author of more than 130 refereed publications, she is particularly known for her work on the characterization and remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Dr. Abriola’s numerous professional activities have included service on the US Environmental Protection Agency Sci- ence Advisory Board, the NRC Water Science and Technology Board, and the US Department of Energy’s Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Advisory Committee. She served on the NRC’s Com- mittee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, which investigated the 1  Here and throughout, NRC designates the National Research Council unless otherwise indicated.

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APPENDIX 157 efficacy of pump-and-treat technologies; Committee on Gender Differ- ences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty; and the NAE Offshoring Engineering Workshop Committee. She is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Association for Women Geoscientists’ Outstanding Educator Award (1996), the National Ground Water Associa- tion’s Distinguished Darcy Lectureship (1996), and the Strategic Environ- mental Research and Development Program (SERDP) Project of the Year Award in Environmental Restoration (2006 and 2012) and was named Drexel University’s Engineering Leader of the Year in 2013. Dean Abriola received her PhD and master’s degree from Princeton University and a bachelor’s degree from Drexel University, all in civil engineering. Dr. Sybilla Beckmann University of Georgia Sybilla Beckmann, Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor of Mathematics at the University of Georgia, has done research in arithme- tic geometry but is currently interested in the mathematical education of ­ teachers and mathematics content for students at all levels, especially pre-K through the middle grades. She is interested in helping college faculty learn to teach mathematics content courses for elementary and middle school teachers and works with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows toward that end. She developed mathematics content courses for prospec- tive elementary school teachers at the University of Georgia, wrote a book for such courses, Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, now in its fourth edition, and is studying future middle school teachers’ thinking and learn- ing about proportional relationships. She has worked on the development of several states’ mathematics standards. In addition, Beckmann was a member of the writing team of the National Council of Teachers of Mathe­ matics (NCTM)’s Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathe­ atics, the mathematics writing team for the Common m Core State Standards Initiative, and the NRC committee that produced the report Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excel- lence and Equity. She taught at Yale University as J.W. Gibbs Instructor of Math­ matics and also taught an average 6th grade mathematics class e at a local public school in order to better understand school mathemat- ics teaching. She earned her PhD in mathe­ atics from the University of m Pennsylvania.

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158 STEM INTEGRATION IN K–12 EDUCATION Dr. Susan Hackwood California Council on Science and Technology Susan Hackwood is executive director of the California Council on Sci- ence and Technology (CCST) and professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Riverside, where in 1990 she was the founding dean of Bourns College of Engineering. In 2003–2005 she was a visiting scholar at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management and in 2005 a visit- ing scholar at the California Institute of Technology. In 1984 she joined the University of California, Santa Barbara, as professor of electrical and computer engineering and was founder and director of the National Sci- ence Foundation Engineering Research Center for Robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM). Before joining academia, she was department head of device robotics technology research at AT&T Bell Labs, where, among other things, she invented and named the electrowetting effect, now used in many micro devices and an increasing number of applica- tions. Her current research interests are science and technology policy, innovation mechanisms, and distributed asynchronous and cellular robotic systems. She has worked extensively with industry, academia, and govern- ment partnerships to identify policy issues of societal importance. She is also active in regional, state, national, and international economic, sci- ence, and technology development (e.g., in Mexico, Taiwan, Vietnam, and Costa Rica). She is a fellow of the IEEE and the AAAS. For the AAAS, she has served as engineering delegate and chaired the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy and the section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering. Since 2006 she has been a member of the IEEE Spectrum ­ ditorial Board. She also serves on the boards of directors and E consults on new product development for several technology companies. She cofounded and coedited the Journal of Robotic Systems from 1984 to 2005. She received her PhD in solid-state ­onics in 1979 from DeMontfort i University, UK, and holds honorary degrees from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (PhD) and DeMontfort University (DSc). Dr. Alfred L. Hall II University of Memphis Alfred Hall is an assistant professor of science education at the University of Memphis, where he is also director of the West Tennessee STEM Collabo- ratory Hub. He was previously chief of staff for the Memphis city schools

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APPENDIX 159 system and served the district in other capacities, such as chief academic officer, associate superintendent of curriculum and instruction, and direc- tor of mathematics and science, for a school system of 106,000 students and more than 7,000 teachers. He began his educational career as a high school teacher of biology and physics and an instructor of biology and pro- gram director for an undergraduate STEM program for underrepresented students at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. He has also worked as a science education specialist for the Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Consortium at Appalachia Educational Laboratory, which sup- ported state education agencies and school districts in Kentucky, Tennes- see, Virginia, and West Virginia. In 1999 he was selected to serve as project director of the Delta Rural Systemic Initiative, a reform program funded by the National Science Foundation to support poor, rural school districts in the delta areas of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. In 2001, he began directing the Memphis Urban Systemic Program and provided leadership for mathematics and science education, teacher professional development, and student support programs. He has served on the National Science Advisory Board for Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Publishing Company and the National Task Force for Recruiting, Retaining, and Supporting Teachers ­ of Mathematics for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He received his PhD in science education from George Mason University. Dr. Jennifer Hicks I-STEM Resource Network Jennifer Hicks is K–12 science program manager for Purdue University’s I-STEM Resource Network, managing professional development and curriculum implementation for the Indiana Science Initiative, a K–8 sys- temic science initiative that has engaged 2,000 teachers and 134 schools in research-developed science curriculum and professional development. Prior to this position she was science curriculum specialist in the Office of Curriculum and Instruction for the Indiana Department of Education, where she managed the development of science standards, supported cur- riculum resources for science, and promoted innovation in science teach- ing throughout the state. A former high school teacher in California, she received a Life Sciences Single Subject Credential from San Francisco State University. She also holds a Professional Educator’s License in the State of Indiana in chemistry and life sciences. She has taught biology, chemistry, marine biology, and Earth sciences at the high school level and science at

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160 STEM INTEGRATION IN K–12 EDUCATION the postsecondary and graduate levels at Webster University in St. Louis and at Indiana University in Bloomington. With a BS in biology and a PhD in visual sciences from Indiana University, she was an NIH postdoctoral fellow in the Biology Department at Washington University in St. Louis, where she performed research on proteins in fruit flies. Mr. Stephen J. Krak Battelle Steve Krak is an open innovation manager for Battelle’s energy and envi- ronment business, responsible for intellectual property management and business development. He began his 25-year career at Battelle as an electrical engineering intern and has handled assignments in photonics and microfabrication R&D, project management, line management, busi- ness development (domestic and international), and intellectual property management. He is a long-time volunteer in the classroom and served four years as founding program manager of the Ohio STEM Learning Network, a public-private collaboration to change the relationship between economic development, education, and personal prosperity in Ohio. He also managed the proposal process for Ohio’s winning Race to the Top submission and was relationship manager to New York at the beginning of Battelle’s multi- state STEM network program. Mr. Bill Kurtz DSST Public Schools Bill Kurtz is founding head of school and CEO of the Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST), a charter school management organiza- tion that is opening ten secondary schools on five campuses in Denver. The flagship school of DSST Public Schools has become an exemplar for high school reform and a leader in STEM education nationwide. The combina- tion of the school’s significant year-to-year student learning growth, very diverse student population, innovative school culture, and 100 percent college acceptance rate for its graduates has made DSST a change agent for local public schools and a destination for school reformers from all over the country. Bill was recognized as the 2010 Entrepreneur of the Year by the New Schools Venture Fund at its national summit in Washington, DC, and in 2008 was named one of 25 champions of public education in Denver over the last 25 years by the Public Education Business Coalition. He serves

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APPENDIX 161 on the advisory council of the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. Before joining DSST, he was principal of Link Community School, an indepen- dent middle school in Newark, New Jersey. He graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University with a BA and earned an MA from Columbia University’s Teachers College in educational administration and leadership. Dr. Richard Lehrer Peabody College of Vanderbilt University Richard Lehrer is the Frank W. Mayborn Professor of Education at V ­ anderbilt University’s Peabody College. He worked previously at the University of Wisconsin–Madison as associate director of the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Math­ maticse and Science. He collaborates with teachers to craft, implement, and assess modeling approaches to mathematics and science education in the elementary and middle school grades. He has also formulated innovative geometry instruction for primary and elementary school students that is guided by longitudinal study of student thinking about space. He is a former high school science teacher and has pioneered classroom research that investigates cognitive technologies as tools for thought in mathematics and science. He has served on the NRC Committees on the Foundations of Assessment and on Systems of Statewide Science Assessment, and the NAE/ NRC Committee on Engineering in K–12 Education. He has a PhD in edu- cational psychology and statistics from the University of New York, Albany. Ms. Beth McGrath Stevens Institute of Technology Beth McGrath is chief of staff in the president’s office at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ. She was previously executive director of the institute’s Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Educa- tion (CIESE) and senior research associate in its Schools of Engineering & Science and Systems & Enterprises. Since 2005, under her leadership, CIESE has been honored with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Mentoring and has garnered more than $26 million in STEM education and research projects (sponsored by the National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, NJ Depart- ment of Education, and US Department of Education), mainly in K–12

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162 STEM INTEGRATION IN K–12 EDUCATION engineering and science education, 21st century skills, and STEM scale- up and capacity building in K–12 and higher education. She played a key role in several national Internet-in-K–12 science education curriculum development and teacher training initiatives for more than 35,000 teachers in 23 states and 8 countries. Her research interests include organizational development and capacity building in K–12 education, diffusion of tech- nology innovations in K–12, and the role of engineering in 21st century skill development. She serves on the Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) Assessment Standing Committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) as well as several advisory boards of science and engineering education development projects. She holds a BS degree in mass communications from Virginia Commonwealth University and an MEd from the University of Maryland. Dr. Barbara M. Means SRI International Barbara Means, codirector of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, is a leader in defining issues and approaches for evaluating the implementation and efficacy of technology-supported educational innovations. Her research focuses on ways technology can support stu- dents’ learning of advanced skills and the revitalization of classrooms and schools, and on STEM-focused secondary schools that target underserved populations and do not use selective admissions processes. In addition, she is directing SRI’s work supporting the National Science Foundation’s effort to implement a K–12 STEM education indicator system, as recommended by the 2013 NRC report Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K–12 STEM Education. Her published works include the edited volumes Evaluating Educational Technology, Technology and Education Reform, and Teaching Advanced Skills to At-Risk Students and the jointly authored volumes Using Technology Evaluation to Advance Student Learning, The Connected School, and Comparative Studies of How People Think. A fellow of the American Educational Research Association, Dr. Means serves on the boards of the Oracle Education Foundation and CFY, a nonprofit organization promot- ing effective uses of technology in schools that serve low-income students. She has served on the NRC Committee on Highly Successful Schools or Programs for K–12 STEM Education, Board on Testing and Assessment, and the committee that produced How People Learn. She earned her bach-

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APPENDIX 163 elor’s degree in psychology from Stanford University and her PhD in edu- cational psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. Ms. Donna Migdol Oceanside School District, New York Donna Migdol is a 5th- and 6th-grade “project extra” elementary teacher in Oceanside, New York, where her students are passionately involved in STEM learning. She previously taught grades 3–6 and was the math­ matics e lead teacher and supervisor for K–6 mathematics and science. She has presented her classroom engineering design and math lessons to the Peer Review Panel in Albany and to the National Science Foundation. WNET and Teacher Net filmed her third grade classroom, highlighting engineer- ing design coupled with inquiry-based math and science instruction, and in 2012 her fifth graders were filmed by the Teaching Channel and WNET in “Roller Coaster Physics” (www.teachingchannel.org/videos/teaching- stem-strategies). Ms. Migdol codeveloped and facilitated the Math, Sci- ence, and Technology Summer Institute at Hofstra University, where she is an adjunct professor teaching graduate STEM courses, and she partnered with Hofstra’s Center for Technological Literacy as a curriculum writer and ­ professional developer for two grant-funded projects supporting STEM literacy in grades 6–8. As keynote presenter for Hofstra’s HNET Confer- ence, she spoke about “What a classroom could be. . . .” She has also served as an elementary mathematics and STEM consultant for school districts across Long Island. She has published several articles and her work has been cited in Alfie Kohn’s book, The Schools Our Children Deserve, as well as Exemplary Science in Grades 5–8: Standards-Based Success Stories, edited by Robert E. Yager. Dr. Mitchell J. Nathan University of Wisconsin–Madison Mitchell Nathan is a professor of learning sciences in the Department of Educational Psychology and director of the Center on Education and Work, both at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, as well as faculty member for the Latin American School for Education, Cognitive, and Neural Sci- ences. He also holds affiliate appointments in the UW-Madison Depart- ment of Curriculum and Instruction, Department of Psychology, and Wisconsin Center for Education Research. In research and development in

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164 STEM INTEGRATION IN K–12 EDUCATION artificial intelligence, computer vision, and robotic mobility, he has worked on the design and development of autonomous robotic arms and vehicles; the development of expert systems and knowledge engineering interview techniques; and the representation of perceptual and real-world knowledge to support inference making in dynamic environments. He has also worked on computer-based mathematics tutoring that relies heavily on students’ comprehension processes for self-evaluation and self-directed learn- ing (so-called unintelligent tutoring systems). Prof. Nathan directed the p ­ roject Supporting the Transition from Arithmetic to Algebraic Reason­ ngi (STAAR; funded by the Interagency Education Research Initiative, IERI), which studied the transition from arithmetic to algebraic reasoning. He is co-PI for both the AWAKEN Project (“Aligning educational experiences with WAys of Knowing ENgineering”), which documents how people learn and use engineering, and the National Center for Cognition and Mathematics Instruction. He is a member of the steering committee for the Delta Program, which promotes the development of a national faculty in the natural and social sciences, engineering, and mathematics that is committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences. He received his PhD in experimental (cognitive) psychology and holds a BS in electrical and computer engineering, math- ematics, and history. Dr. Mark Sanders Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Mark Sanders, Virginia Tech Professor Emeritus of Integrative STEM Education/Technology Education, has been working for more than two decades in integrative STEM education. As co-PI of the Technology, Science, Mathematics (TSM) Integration Project (NSF, 1991–1996) he coauthored Technology, Science, Mathematics Connection Activities (1996, McGraw-Hill) and Engineering & Design Applications (2008, McGraw- Hill). In 2003, he conceptualized Virginia Tech’s unique integrative STEM education graduate program, which he cofounded in 2005 and for which he continues to advise PhD candidates. From 1980 to 2005 he pioneered, dis- seminated, and taught emerging communication technologies, including e-publishing (1981), digital multimedia (1983), interactive video (1984), digital video and holography (1992), and Web-based portfolios (1995). He wrote Communication Technology: Today and Tomorrow, the first textbook to address digital cross-media publishing technologies (McGraw-Hill,

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APPENDIX 165 1991, 1996). He was founding editor of the Journal of Technology Education (JTE; 1989–1997) and pioneered free global access to the journal (begin- ning in 1992) before the Web became viable. He established and edited Graphic Comm Central (1997–2009), the Web portal for graphic commu- nication educators. He began his career as a high school technology teacher in Albany, NY. Mr. Michael Town STEM High School For the past 27 years Mike Town has taught numerous integrated STEM courses at the high school level in Redmond, Washington, including Advanced Placement environmental science and environmental engineer- ing and sustainability design. The courses are dual credited and Career and Technical Education (CTE) certified. He has worked on committees to design standards for a state-certified CTE course in environmental science and sustainability and an endorsement certification in environmental and sustainability education for preservice teachers. He has also written envi- ronmental curriculum, most notably the Cool School Challenge (CSC), which enables students to conduct energy audits and develop action plans to measure and reduce the carbon footprint of schools across the United States. The CSC has won the EPA Clean Air Award, and Mike’s students received the President’s Environmental Youth Award from President Bush. Mike also helped design an environmental education center and serves as a board member for the Environmental Education Association of Wash- ington. He has won the National Education Association Foundation Green Prize for the United States, Environmental Educator of the Year from the North American Association of Environmental Educators, and the Con- servation Fund Environmental Educator Award for the United States. In 2010–2011, as a National Science Foundation Einstein Fellow, he worked on STEM education policy issues for the National Science Board. He also served on the steering committee for the NRC Board on Science Education workshop on Climate Change Education in the Formal Setting K–14 and is a current member of the NRC Teacher Advisory Committee. He earned degrees in environmental science and education from Huxley College of the Environment and Western Washington University and a master’s degree in science education from the University of Washington.

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