Appendix E

Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members

George Hornberger, Chair, is distinguished university professor at Vanderbilt University, where he also directs the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and the Environment. He also has a shared appointment there as the Craig E. Philip Professor of Engineering and as Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences. He previously was a professor at the University of Virginia for many years where he held the Ernest H. Ern Chair of Environmental Sciences. He has been a visiting scholar at the Australian National University, Lancaster University, Stanford University, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Colorado, and the University of California, Berkeley. His research is aimed at understanding complex water–energy–climate interrelationships and at how hydrological processes affect the transport of dissolved and suspended constituents through catchments and aquifers. He is an Institute for Scientific Information Highly Cited Researcher in environmental sciences and engineering, a recognition given to the top 250 individual researchers in each of 21 subject categories. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the Geological Society of America, and the Association for Women in Science. He was president of the Hydrology Section of AGU from 2006 to 2008. He has been a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (a Presidential appointment) since April 2004. He has served on numerous boards and committees of the National Research Council, including as chair of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources (1996-2000) and chair of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2003-2009). Dr. Hornberger won the Robert E. Horton Award (Hydrology Section) from the AGU in 1993. In 1995, he received the John Wesley Powell Award from the USGS. In 1999, he was presented with the Excellence in Geophysical Education Award by the AGU, and in 2007 he was selected Virginia Outstanding Scientist. Dr. Hornberger is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, having been elected in 1996. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering and an M.S. in hydrology from Drexel University, and a Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University.

Kate Hadley Baker is retired after nearly 30 years of experience in the upstream industry and was recently the technology unit coordinator of Reservoir Performance for the BP Upstream Technology Group and the senior advisor of Subsurface for BP Group. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Baker served as the director of Upstream Digital Business for BP Amoco, managing the consolidation of BP,



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 61
Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members George Hornberger, Chair, is distinguished university professor at Vanderbilt University, where he also directs the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and the Environment. He also has a shared appointment there as the Craig E. Philip Professor of Engineering and as Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences. He previously was a professor at the University of Virginia for many years where he held the Ernest H. Ern Chair of Environmental Sciences. He has been a visiting scholar at the Australian National University, Lancaster University, Stanford University, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Colorado, and the University of California, Berkeley. His research is aimed at understanding complex water–energy–climate interrelationships and at how hydrological processes affect the transport of dissolved and suspended constituents through catchments and aquifers. He is an Institute for Scientific Information Highly Cited Researcher in environmental sciences and engi- neering, a recognition given to the top 250 individual researchers in each of 21 subject categories. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the Geological Society of America, and the Association for Women in Science. He was president of the Hydrology Section of AGU from 2006 to 2008. He has been a member of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (a Presidential appointment) since April 2004. He has served on numerous boards and committees of the National Research Council, including as chair of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources (1996-2000) and chair of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (2003-2009). Dr. Hornberger won the Robert E. Horton Award (Hydrology Section) from the AGU in 1993. In 1995, he received the John Wesley Powell Award from the USGS. In 1999, he was presented with the Excellence in ­ eophysical Education Award by the AGU, and in 2007 he was selected Virginia G Outstanding Scientist. Dr. Hornberger is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, having been elected in 1996. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering and an M.S. in hydrology from Drexel University, and a Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University. Kate Hadley Baker is retired after nearly 30 years of experience in the upstream industry and was recently the technology unit coordinator of Reservoir Performance for the BP Upstream Technology Group and the senior advisor of Subsurface for BP Group. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Baker served as the director of Upstream Digital Business for BP Amoco, managing the consolidation of BP, 61

OCR for page 61
62 APPENDIX E Amoco, and later, ARCO Upstream IT assets. In 1997, she served as manager of the Technical Services Group at Amoco Worldwide Exploration. There, she managed a group of 130-150 people providing hardcopy data to high-performance computing services. Other positions Dr. Baker held at Amoco include exploration manager of the Rockies Gas Business Unit, Amoco U.S. Operations/ Energy Group, North America, and director of Geoscience Technology for Amoco Production Research. Dr. Baker joined Amoco to help form an upstream R&D organization that could do both research and technical services under one roof. From 1975 to 1994, she held many positions for Exxon Production Research Company and Exxon Company, USA, including research geologist, research supervisor, senior supervisory geologist, project leader, planning advisor, division opera- tions geologist, well evaluation coordinator, and senior research supervisor. She has been a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) for 25 years and is a member of the Department of Energy’s Council on Earth Sciences. Dr. Baker holds a B.S. in geology and a Ph.D. in geophysics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Susan Brantley is distinguished professor of geosciences in the College of Earth and Mineral Sci- ences at Pennsylvania State University where she is also the director of the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute. She has been on the faculty at Penn State since 1986. Dr. Brantley’s career as a geochemist focuses on the chemistry of natural waters both at the surface of the earth and deeper in the crust. Dr. Brantley and her research group investigate chemical, biological, and physical processes associated with the circulation of aqueous fluids in shallow hydrogeologic settings. She has published more than 160 refereed journal articles and 15 book chapters. Dr. Brantley is a f ­ ellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the Geological Society of America (GSA), the Geochemical Society, the European Association of Geochemistry, and the International Association for GeoChemistry. She was president of the Geochemical Society from 2006 to 2008. Dr. Brantley was awarded the Arthur L. Day Medal from the GSA in 2011, the Presidential Award from the Soil Science Society of America in 2012, and an honorary doctorate from the Paul Sabatier University (Toulouse III, France) in 2012. Dr. Brantley was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board in 2012 by President Barack Obama. Also in 2012, she was elected to membership in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Brantley received her A.B. in chemistry (1980) and her M.A. and Ph.D. in geological and geophysical sciences in 1983 and 1987, respectively, all from Princeton University. Michael E. Hohn was appointed state geologist and director of the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey in Morgantown, West Virginia, in 2006. He has published more than 50 papers on energy resources and a book on geostatistics. His research interests include carbon sequestra- tion, resource assessment, reservoir heterogeneity, and geostatistics. He was principal investigator for several projects funded by the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Energy, the former Gas Research Institute, and the U.S. Forest Service. He served as treasurer, secretary general, and president for the International Association for Mathematical Geology (IAMG); secretary, vice presi- dent, and president for the Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG); deputy editor of Natural Resources Research; editor-in-chief of Mathematical Geology; and treasurer for the Association of American State Geologists. His committee work has included the Energy Statistics Committee of the American Statistical Association, the Geologic Computing Committee of AAPG, and the Publication Committee of the IAMG. He is a fellow of the Geologi- cal Society of America. He holds a B.S. in geology from Binghamton University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in geology from Indiana University. Carl Kirby is professor of geology at Bucknell University where he also directs the Marcellus Shale Initiative. He has recently published abstracts, supervised student research, and is preparing

OCR for page 61
APPENDIX E 63 articles on Marcellus Shale issues. Dr. Kirby has given numerous invited presentations and is col- laborating with colleagues at the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Pittsburgh, and Binghamton University. He recently presented at an Environmental Protection Agency workshop on hydraulic fracturing. His research interests include alkalinity and acidity measurement and theory in mine drainage, municipal solid waste ash characterization and alteration, and mine drainage sediments for use as pigment. Dr. Kirby holds a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in geology from Virginia Poly- technic Institute and State University.

OCR for page 61