Appendix B


Panelists’ Biographies

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CHRISTINE ROMANS is the host of Your Money, CNN’s Saturday and Sunday business program. She also reports on the economy, politics, and international business for CNN’s morning shows, and her reporting is regularly featured on CNN International. Her coverage focuses on breaking developments in the current economic crises and what they mean to Americans and their money. She is known for her “Romans’ Numeral” segment, in which she deconstructs complex stories and explains what they mean for the viewer. When President Obama talks about the economic crisis and the road ahead, she provides perspective and analysis of the administration’s efforts.

She investigated the collapse of Enron, WorldCom, and numerous other corporate scams and has reported on corruption from the point of view of the investor. She has also extensively covered immigration reform, substance abuse, homeland security, American foreign policy with China and Latin America, and education.

She received an Emmy Award in 2004 for her work on “Exporting America,” a Lou Dobbs Tonight investigation into the impact of globalization on US workers. The National Foundation for Women Legislators honored her with its media excellence award for business reporting and in 2009 she was selected for the Greenlee School of Journalism’s James W. Schwartz Award.

She was previously a correspondent for Moneyline, and before joining CNN she reported for Reuters and Knight-Ridder Financial News in the futures trading pits of Chicago. She is the author of two books:



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Appendix B Panelists’ Biographies CHRISTINE ROMANS is the host of Your Money, CNN’s Saturday and Sunday business program. She also reports on the economy, poli- tics, and international business for CNN’s morning shows, and her reporting is regularly featured on CNN International. Her coverage focuses on breaking developments in the current economic crises and what they mean to Ameri- cans and their money. She is known for her “Romans’ Numeral” segment, in which she deconstructs complex stories and explains what they mean for the viewer. When President Obama talks about the economic crisis and the road ahead, she provides perspective and analysis of the administration’s efforts. She investigated the collapse of Enron, WorldCom, and numerous other corporate scams and has reported on corruption from the point of view of the investor. She has also extensively covered immigration reform, substance abuse, homeland security, American foreign policy with China and Latin America, and education. She received an Emmy Award in 2004 for her work on “Exporting America,” a Lou Dobbs Tonight investigation into the impact of global- ization on US workers. The National Foundation for Women Legislators honored her with its media excellence award for business reporting and in 2009 she was selected for the Greenlee School of Journalism’s James W. Schwartz Award. She was previously a correspondent for Moneyline, and before join- ing CNN she reported for Reuters and Knight-Ridder Financial News in the futures trading pits of Chicago. She is the author of two books: 27

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28 APPENDIX B How to Speak Money (Wiley, 2011) and Smart Is the New Rich (Wiley, 2010). She is a graduate of Iowa State University. DAVID BAGGETT heads Arcode Corporation, which he founded in 2008. The company’s first product, inky®, is revolutionizing the email user experience by making email smarter, simpler, and safer. Before that he cofounded ITA Software, with two other graduates of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. The company developed the first new airfare pricing and shopping software in decades, and licensed the tech- nology to most major US and many international airlines. Its technol- ogy powers Orbitz, Kayak, Hipmunk, and many other travel industry websites. Google purchased ITA Software for over $700 million in 2011. Mr. Baggett studied computational linguistics with Robert Berwick in the PhD program at the MIT AI Lab, but left in 1994 to join video game company Naughty Dog, where he codeveloped the Crash Bandi- coot series for the Sony PlayStation. The Crash games were worldwide bestsellers that redefined the state of the art, leading Sony to adopt Crash as its mascot. As one of two developers on the first game in the series, Mr. Baggett pioneered the use of distributed polygonal scene pre- computation to vastly reduce rendering time and greatly increase scene complexity. He also introduced octree- based collision detection to the video game world, and implemented many of the level processing tools and the entire rendering pipeline. He graduated magna cum laude with a BS/BA in computer science and linguistics from the University of Maryland in 1992, when he also received the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences Dean’s Award for Academic Excel- lence. He worked extensively with Bill Pugh and Bill Gasarch in the Computer Science Department, and with Sharon Inkelas in the Linguis- tics Department. WILLIAM F. BANHOLZER is an executive vice president leading Dow Chemical Company’s venture capital, new business development, and licensing activities, and is also Dow’s chief technology officer. He chairs the company’s Innovation and New Business Development Com- mittee, which oversees investments in new technologies and major busi- ness initiatives, and Corporate Responsibility Committee. He is also a member of the board of directors for the Dow Corning Corporation,

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APPENDIX B 29 the Dow AgroSciences Members Committee, and the Dow Foundation Board of Directors. Dr. Banholzer sets the company’s vision for science and technology and leads the execution of that vision, managing a portfolio of research programs with an annual budget of $1.7 billion. Under his leadership the value of Dow’s innovation pipeline has tripled from $10 billion to over $32 billion. His efforts to accelerate the company’s technology development were recognized by R&D Magazine, which ranked Dow in the top ten for R&D in all industries, and a recent Booz Allen study ranked the company’s innovation portfolio management “Best in Class.” Dr. Banholzer also received the Indus- trial Research Institute’s Holland Award for R&D management and the Council of Chemical Research’s Pruitt Award for his innovative approach to research collaborations. Dr. Banholzer had a 22-year career with General Electric Company before joining Dow. He joined GE in 1983 as a staff chemical engineer and held a number of leadership roles, including head of R&D for superabrasives and of GE lighting. He received numerous GE honors: the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Patent Awards; Superabrasives Leadership Award; Plastics CEO Six Sigma Award; and election to the Whitney Gallery of Technical Achievers. He left GE as vice president of global technology at GE Advanced Materials, where he was responsible for worldwide technology and engineering. Dr. Banholzer earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Mar- quette University and master’s and doctoral degrees in chemical engi- neering from the University of Illinois. He is a certified Six Sigma Master Black Belt. ALEC M. BROERS spent nearly 20 years in research with IBM in the United States, working at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in New York, the East Fishkill Development Laboratory, and corporate headquarters. He then returned to Cambridge and set up a nanofabrication labora- tory to extend the technology of miniaturization to the atomic scale. He also developed his research on using electrons, x-rays, and ultraviolet light in microscopy and on making microelectronic components. From 1996 to 2003 he was vice chancellor at the University of Cambridge, and in 1998 he was knighted for services to higher education. Lord Broers has served on numerous national and international

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30 APPENDIX B committees, including the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the Foresight Panel on Information Technology, the NATO Special Panel on Nanoscience, and the UK government’s Council for Science and Technology. He is on the board of directors of Vodafone and RJ Mears LLC. He was elected to the Royal Academy of Engineering in 1985, the Royal Society in 1986, and became a foreign associate of the US National Academy of Engineering in 1994. In 2004 Her Majesty the Queen made him a life Peer in recognition of his contribution to engineering and higher education. He was appointed chairman of the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee. In 2005 he presented the Reith Lectures for the BBC. In 2008 he became chair- man of Diamond Light Source Ltd., the UK’s largest new experimental scientific facility. In 2009 he became chairman of Bio Nano Consulting and in 2010 chairman of the Technology Strategy Board Knowledge Transfer Network for Transport. In 2012 he chaired the Judging Panel of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Lord Broers received a first degree in physics from Melbourne Uni- versity in 1959 and then went to the University of Cambridge, where he completed a degree in electrical sciences (after arriving initially as a choral scholar) and his PhD in 1965. JOHN A. MONTGOMERY is director of research at the US Naval Research Laboratory, where he oversees research and development pro- grams with expenditures of approximately $1.2 billion per year. He joined the NRL in 1968 as a research physicist in the Advanced Tech- niques Branch of the Electronic Warfare Division, where he conducted research on a wide range of electronic warfare topics. In 1980 he was selected to head the Off-Board Countermeasures Branch, and in 1985 he was named superintendent of the Tactical Electronic Warfare Division. He has been responsible for numerous systems developed/approved for operational use by the Navy and other services, and had great impact through the application of advanced technologies to solve unusual or severe operational deficiencies during world crises, most recently in Afghanistan, Iraq, as well as for Homeland Defense and in the Pacific Theater. Dr. Montgomery received the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award in 2001, the Department of the Navy Distin- guished Civilian Service Award in 1999, the 1997 Dr. Arthur E. Bisson

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APPENDIX B 31 Prize for Naval Technology Achievement in 1998, and the Depart- ment of the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1986. Further, he received the Association of Old Crows (Electronic Defense Association) Joint Services Award in 1993. As a member of the senior executive service, he received the Presidential Rank Award of Distinguished Executive in 1991 and 2002, and the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive in 1988, 1999, and 2007. He was an NRL Edison Scholar and is a member of Sigma Xi. He was US national leader of the Technical Cooperation Program’s multi- national Group on Electronic Warfare from 1987 to 2002, and served as its executive chairman. He received the Laboratory Director of the Year award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer in 2006, and in 2011 the Roger W. Jones Award for Executive Leadership from American University’s School of Public Affairs. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2013. Dr. Montgomery received his BS degree in 1967 and MS in 1969 from North Texas State University and his PhD from the Catholic Uni- versity of America in 1982, all in physics. SUBRA SURESH became president of Carnegie Mellon University on July 1, 2013, after serving as director of the National Science Founda- tion, a position for which he was nominated by President Barack Obama and unanimously confirmed by the Senate in 2010. From 2007 to 2010 he was dean and Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering at the Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology. His research into the properties of materials and discoveries of connections between cell properties and human diseases has shaped new fields in the fertile inter- sections of traditional disciplines. He has authored some 300 research articles, 21 patents, and three widely used books. In his leadership roles at MIT and NSF, Dr. Suresh established initiatives to advance education, innovation, interdisciplinary research, diversity, and global collabora- tion. He was the founding chair of the governing board of the Global Research Council, a virtual organization established by leading funding agencies from nearly 50 developed and developing nations to harmonize and coordinate practices that enhance international collaboration. Dr. Suresh is an elected member of the US National Academies of Sciences and Engineering, American Academy of Arts and Sciences,

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32 APPENDIX B and academies in Germany, Italy, Sweden, Spain, and India. He has been awarded ten honorary doctorate degrees from universities in the United States, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, China, and India. In 2011 the president of India awarded him the Padma Shri, one of the highest civilian honors, for his contributions to science and technology. In 2006 Technology Review magazine selected him as a top-ten researcher whose work “will have a significant impact on business, medicine, or culture.” His other honors include the 2006 Acta Materialia Gold Medal, the 2007 European Materials Medal, the 2008 Eringen Medal of the Society of Engineering Science, the 2011 Nadai Medal and 2012 Timoshenko Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the 2013 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Mechanical Engineering and Materi- als Science from the Franklin Institute. MARIE THURSBY is a Regents’ Professor and holds the Hal and John Smith Chair in Entrepreneurship at the Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology. She is also the Georgia Tech Social and Ethical Coordinator for the NSF National Nanotechnology Infrastruc- ture Network, and has been a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research since 1987. Dr. Thursby is the founding director of the nationally acclaimed program Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Returns (TI:GER), a unique educational collaboration between Georgia Tech and Emory that teams PhD students in engineering and science with MBA and JD students in an experiential curriculum focused on the intersection of technical, legal, and business issues at the heart of innovation. Established in 2002 with an NSF Integra- tive Graduate Education in Research Training (IGERT) award, TI:GER has received the Award for Exceptional Activity in Entrepreneurship Across Disciplines from the Global Consortium of Entrepreneurship Centers, the Academy of Management Entrepreneur- ship Pedagogy Award, and the Model Specialty Entrepreneurship Pro- gram Award from the United States Association for Small Business Enterprise. Dr. Thursby has published extensively on the economics of innova- tion, with emphasis on the role of universities in innovation systems, multinational R&D decisions, and the role of contracts in effective technology transfer. Her current research focuses on incentive problems

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APPENDIX B 33 in biomedical translational research and information sharing among competitive researchers. Before joining Georgia Tech, Dr. Thursby held the Burton D. Mor- gan Chair of International Policy and Management at Purdue University, where she established three multidisciplinary programs: the Innovation Realization Lab (launched in 1998 with an NSF IGERT), the Alan and Mildred Peterson Technology Transfer Initiative, and the Purdue Center for International Business Education and Research. She held prior fac- ulty appointments at the University of Michigan, Ohio State University, Syracuse University, and North Carolina State University. She received her AB cum laude from Mount Holyoke College and her PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, both in economics.

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