Appendix F
Networks, Hubs, and Resources for Science Communication

Workshop participants mentioned a number of useful resources for those interested in designing public engagement projects as well as examples of existing networks and hubs that could serve as models for a life science communication network.

•   CAISE: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education’s projects space (www.informalscience.org/projects), a resource with information on informal science education projects.

•   CAKE: Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (www.cakex.org), a clearinghouse of climate change adaptation initiatives that could serve as a model for a clearinghouse of science communication initiatives.

•   CienciaPR: Ciencia Puerto Rico (www.cienciapr.org), a collaboration-promoting network of scientists, professionals, students, and citizens who share a passion and interest in science and science education that aims to encourage scientific research in Puerto Rico and raise awareness about the importance of science in Puerto Rico.

•   COMPASS (compassonline.org), a team of science-based communication professionals helping scientists engage with the public, the media, and policy makers about their research.

•   IAN: Integration and Application Network (ian.umces.edu), a group of scientists and staff at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science who are seeking to solve environmental problems by synthesizing data, communicating scientific knowledge, and developing solutions. IAN also provides communications training to scientists.

•   Leopold Leadership Program (leopoldleadership.stanford.edu), which trains scientists to communicate with nonscientist audiences and to translate their knowledge into action related to environmental sustainability.

•   SCIMEP: Science, Media and the Public (scimep.wisc.edu/), a research group that addresses the social, legal, and ethical implications of controversial scientific issues and technologies.

•   USDA Cooperative Extension System (www.csrees.usda.gov/qlinks/extension.html), a potential model for a life science communication infrastructure, and_eXtension (www.extension.org), an online hub connecting Cooperative Extension specialists directly with users in an interactive learning environment.



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Appendix F Networks, Hubs, and Resources for Science Communication Workshop participants mentioned a number of useful resources for those interested in designing public engagement projects as well as examples of existing networks and hubs that could serve as models for a life science communication network.  CAISE: Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education’s projects space (www.informalscience.org/projects), a resource with information on informal science education projects.  CAKE: Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (www.cakex.org), a clearinghouse of climate change adaptation initiatives that could serve as a model for a clearinghouse of science communication initiatives.  CienciaPR: Ciencia Puerto Rico (www.cienciapr.org), a collaboration-promoting network of scientists, professionals, students, and citizens who share a passion and interest in science and science education that aims to encourage scientific research in Puerto Rico and raise awareness about the importance of science in Puerto Rico.  COMPASS (compassonline.org), a team of science-based communication professionals helping scientists engage with the public, the media, and policy makers about their research.  IAN: Integration and Application Network (ian.umces.edu), a group of scientists and staff at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science who are seeking to solve environmental problems by synthesizing data, communicating scientific knowledge, and developing solutions. IAN also provides communications training to scientists.  Leopold Leadership Program (leopoldleadership.stanford.edu), which trains scientists to communicate with nonscientist audiences and to translate their knowledge into action related to environmental sustainability.  SCIMEP: Science, Media and the Public (scimep.wisc.edu/), a research group that addresses the social, legal, and ethical implications of controversial scientific issues and technologies.  USDA Cooperative Extension System (www.csrees.usda.gov/qlinks/extension.html), a potential model for a life science communication infrastructure, and eXtension (www.extension.org), an online hub connecting Cooperative Extension specialists directly with users in an interactive learning environment. 75