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A Committee Biographical Information ANDREW BROWN, JR. (NAE) is Vice President and Chief Technologist, Delphi Corporation. Dr. Brown came to Delphi from the GM Research and Development Center in Warren, Michigan, where he was Director-Strategic Futures. He served as Manager of Saturn Car Facilities from 1985 to 1987. At Saturn, he was on the Site Selection Team and responsible for the conceptual design and engineering of this innovative manufacturing facility. Dr. Brown began his GM career as a Project Engineer at Manufacturing Development in 1973. He progressed in the engineering field as a Senior Project Engineer, Staff Development Engineer, and manager of R&D for the Manufacturing Staff. During this period, he worked on manufacturing processes and systems with an emphasis on energy systems, productivity improvement and environmental efficiency. Before joining GM, he supervised process development at Allied-Signal Corporation, now Honeywell, Incorporated, in Morristown, NJ. He earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemical Engineering from Wayne State University in 1971. He received a Master of Business Administration in Finance and Marketing from Wayne State University in 1975 and a Master of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering focus on energy and environmental engineering from the University of Detroit-Mercy in 1978. He completed the Penn State Executive Management Course in 1979. A registered Professional Engineer, Dr. Brown earned a Doctorate of Engineering in September 1992. He is currently or has served on the boards of the following organizations—Society of Automotive Engineers Inc., Engineering Society of Detroit, Convergence Education Foundation, National Inventors Hall of Fame, Convergence Transportation Electronics Foundation, National Council of Engineering Examiners, State of Michigan Board of Professional Engineers, WSR College of Engineering Board of Advisors. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and recently served as a member of the NRC’s Committee on Review of the 21st Century Truck Partnership and chaired the Committee on Fuel Economy of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles. Dr. Brown has been an adjunct professor at Wayne State University, University of Michigan, and Tsinghua University (Beijing, China). INES AZEVEDO is the Executive Director of the Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making, at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and an assistant research professor with Carnegie Mellon University’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy. Dr. Azevedo’s research interests lie at the intersection of environmental, technical, and economic issues, such as how to address the challenge of climate change and to move towards a more sustainable energy system. In particular, she has been looking at how energy systems are likely to be shaped in the future, which requires comprehensive knowledge not only of the technologies that can address future energy needs but also of the decision- making process followed by different agents in the economy. She received her B.Sc in environmental engineering from IST University in Portugual, her M.Sc. in engineering policy and management of technology from IST, and her Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in engineering and public policy. RODICA BARANESCU (NAE) is a professor in the College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago. Before that, she was manager of the fuels, lubricants, and engine group of the International Truck and Engine Corporation, at Melrose Park, Illinois. She is an internationally sought after public speaker on technical issues related to mobility technology, PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

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A-2 COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES environmental control, fuels, and energy. She has extensive expertise in diesel engine technology and was elected to the NAE in 2001 for research leading to effective and environmentally sensitive diesel and alternative-fuel engines and leadership in automotive engineering. She is a fellow of SAE International and was its president in 2000. In 2003 she received the Internal Combustion Engine Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering) (ASME). Dr. Baranescu received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 1961 and 1970, respectively, from the Politehnica University in Bucharest, Romania, where she served as assistant professor (1964-1968), lecturer (1970-1974), and associate professor (1974-1978). THOMAS CACKETTE retired at the end of 2012 after serving as the Chief Deputy Executive Officer of the California Air Resources Board for over 20 years. With the Board since 1982, he managed the Board's motor vehicle emission control program, which develops regulations and other programs to reduce vehicle emissions. He also managed the Board's Monitoring and Laboratory Division, which performs ambient air quality monitoring and develops test methods. Overall, 400 professional and support staff are dedicated to these programs, which are contributing to a steady decline in air pollution in California's major urban areas. Mr. Cackette has been involved in many aspects of air pollution control since 1974. He served as a Legislative lobbyist for the ARB for several years, and worked eight years for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Motor Vehicle Emission Laboratory in a variety of technical, management and policy positions. Prior to that he was involved in rocket engine production, testing and flight performance analysis at Rocketdyne in Los Angeles, where he gained first-hand knowledge of living in the smoggiest city in the U.S. He holds a Masters of Science degree in Engineering and a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has published papers for the Society of Automotive Engineers and Air and Waste Management Association, and is a frequent speaker on air quality issues. He lives with his family in Sacramento. NIGEL N. CLARK is the George B. Berry Chair of Engineering in the Statler College of Engineering & Mineral Resources at West Virginia University (WVU) and Associate Vice President for Academic Strategic Planning at WVU. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Natal, South Africa, and previously held assistant and associate professor positions in the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at WVU. Dr. Clark’s areas of interest include vehicle design, advanced vehicle concepts, alternative fuels and the measurement and reduction of vehicle emissions. He has also published extensively in the areas of particle science and multiphase systems. He has conducted research for government and industry in the areas of fuel economy and emissions from heavy-duty vehicles, including buses and heavy hybrid drive vehicles, and works with the International Council for Clean Transportation on technology and efficiency review. Dr. Clark has contributed to understanding the influence of vehicle activity and test cycles on fuel use, and to relating engine and vehicle dynamometer data. He commenced his career with a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, was recognized as a Benedum Scholar by his institution, and is a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. RONALD GRAVES is the Director of the Sustainable Transportation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which covers the laboratory’s research in vehicle efficiency technologies, fuels, and intelligent transportation systems. He joined ORNL in 1976 after receiving his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Tennessee. He has been a member and leader of many projects in transportation fuels and engines since the early 1980s, including work on pathways to higher engine efficiency, alcohol fuels, and the effects of fuel sulfur and fuel composition on combustion and emissions. He currently serves on the technical teams for the U.S. DRIVE Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership. Over 25 years ago, he led the establishment of engine and emissions research at ORNL that continues today. He has participated in Working Groups of the Coordinating Research Council and is a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Dr. Graves has a record of over 60 publications and reports that encompass subjects in internal combustion engines, fuels, power systems, and materials. He PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

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COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES A-3 shares four patents with co-workers. He recently served on the National Academy of Sciences committee on Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle fuel economy. DAN HANCOCK (NAE) retired from General Motors effective September 1, 2011. He was most recently GM vice president, Global Strategic Product Alliances and had been named to this position on June 1, 2010. In this newly-created position, Dan was charged with building strong product alliance relationships and speeding development and implementation of joint ventures for winning vehicles and technologies. Hancock’s previous appointments included GM Powertrain vice president, global engineering and powertrain, and chief executive officer, Fiat-GM Powertrain, based in Turin, Italy. After joining General Motors in 1968 he held various engineering positions within Allison Transmission Division. In 1983 he became Chief Engineer for Detroit Diesel in Redford, Michigan. He became Technical Director, Advanced Powertrain, at the Chevrolet-Pontiac-GM Canada Group in 1987. In 1992, he was appointed Chief Engineer of the Small Block V8 engine, and in 1994 was appointed director, transmission engineering, GM Powertrain. In 1997, he returned to Indianapolis where he was named president, Allison Transmission Division. Born in Indiana, Hancock received a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1973 and a bachelor's degree also in mechanical engineering from the General Motors Institute, Michigan, in 1974. Hancock served as chairman of the Society of Automotive Engineers Foundation Board of Trustees from 1998 to 2008. He served as president of FISITA, the International Federation of Automotive Engineering Societies, from 2004 to 2006. He was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He is a recipient of the SAE Medal of Honor, the Great Golden Medal for Service to the Republic of Austria, and the Sagamore of the Wabash recognition from the State of Indiana. He has been elected SAE President for 2014. W. MICHAEL HANEMANN (NAS) joined the Arizona State University Department of Economics and the Center for Environmental Economics and Sustainability Policy in 2011 where he is a Wrigley Chair in Sustainability. He came to ASU from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a Chancellor's Professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resources Economics and the Goldman School of Public Policy. His research interests include non-market valuation, the economics of water and of climate change, environmental policy, adaptive management, and demand modeling for market research. Dr. Hanemann has served on many NRC committees and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2011. He is currently a lead author and a contributing lead author for Working Group III of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report on Climate Change. Dr. Hanemann received his B.A. degree from Oxford University in philosophy, politics, and economics, his M.S. from the London School of Economics in development economics, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in Public Finance and Decision Theory and Economics. He received an honorary Ph.D from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and the Lifetime Award for Outstanding Achievement from the European Association of Environmental & Resource Economists. He is an inaugural Fellow of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and a Fellow of the American Association of Agricultural Economics. WINSTON HARRINGTON is senior fellow at Resources for the Future, where his research interests include urban transportation, motor vehicles and air quality, and problems of estimating the costs of environmental policy. He has worked extensively on the economics of enforcing environmental regulations, the health benefits derived from improved air quality, the costs of waterborne disease outbreaks, endangered species policy, federal rulemaking procedures, and the economics of outdoor recreation. Harrington has written or coauthored five books and numerous book chapters. In October 2000, he won the Vernon Award of the Association of Public Policy Analysis and Management for a paper he coauthored, "On the Accuracy of Regulatory Cost Estimates." Harrington has served as a consultant to U.S. state and federal governments, the World Bank, and the Harvard Institute for International Development and has worked in Lithuania, Mexico, and Poland.

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A-4 COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES GARY MARCHANT is a Regents’ Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Center for Law, Science, & Innovation in the College of Law at Arizona State University. He is also a Senior Sustainability Scientist at ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability. Professor Marchant teaches environmental law, science and technology, genetics and the law, and environmental justice. Prior to joining the ASU faculty, he was a partner at the Washington, DC office of the law firm of Kirkland & Ellis, where his practice focused on environmental and administrative law. He received his B.Sc. and Ph.D. in genetics from the University of British Columbia, his M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University, and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. PAUL MENIG is CEO of Tech-I.M., a consultancy. Previously he was employed by Freightliner where he was responsible for daily production problems, field problems, custom work orders, and advanced engineering for electrical and electronic items such as engines, transmissions, brakes, and safety devices. Mr. Menig joined Daimler Trucks North America in July of 1994 and initially led the development of electronics for the new Freightliner Century Class truck product line. Prior to joining Freightliner, Mr. Menig spent seven years with Eaton Truck Components, leading a team as large as sixty-five people in the development of electronic products for automated mechanical transmissions, brakes and tire pressure control. These activities included some world-wide responsibility and coordination with engineering in Europe and joint venture development with Japanese companies. Prior to that, Mr. Menig worked for the industrial automation part of Eaton known as Cutler-Hammer. During those 8 years he lead teams working on sensors, factory communications, programmable and motion controllers and vision inspection equipment. Prior to Eaton, Mr. Menig worked 5 years for General Electric in the areas of medical equipment for hospitals, remotely guided military vehicles (smart bombs) and charge coupled device imagers and signal processors. Mr. Menig graduated from MIT in 1976 with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. He participated in the ABC program of General Electric, completing the A and B portions. Masters degree work in electrical engineering was completed with the exception of a thesis at Marquette University. In addition, Mr. Menig has participated in numerous training programs such as Total Quality Management, Software Development, Strategic Planning, Finance for the Non-Financial Manager, ISO 9000, Vehicle Dynamics, etc. DAVID F. MERRION is chairman of Merrion Expert Consulting LLC; and the retired executive vice president of engineering for Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC), a subsidiary of Daimler Trucks North America. His positions at DDC included staff engineer, Emissions and Combustion; staff engineer, Research and Development; chief engineer, Applications; director, diesel engineering; general director, Engineering (Engines and Transmissions); and senior vice president, Engineering. Mr. Merrion has extensive expertise in the research, development, and manufacturing of advanced diesel engines, including alternative-fueled engines. He is a Society of Automotive Engineers fellow and a member of American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In 2009 he received the ASME Honda Medal and in 2012 he received the SAE Powertrain Innovation Award. He served as president of the Engine Manufacturers Association, a member of Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Mobile Sources Technical Advisory Committee, a member of the Coordinating Research Council; and a member of the U.S. Alternate Fuels Council. He has served on a number of National Research Council committees including the Standing Committee to Review the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles; the Committee on Review of the 21st Century Truck Partnership, Phase 1 and Phase 2; and the Committee to Assess Fuel Economy Technologies for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles. He is presently on the NRC Committee for Assessment of Technologies for Improving Fuel Economy of Light-Duty Vehicles, Phase 2. He has a bachelor of mechanical engineering from General Motors Institute (Kettering University) and a master’s of science degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. AMELIA REGAN is a Professor of Computer Science and Civil (Transportation Systems) Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include dynamic and stochastic network PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

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COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES A-5 optimization, parallel and distributed computing, optimal contracting, port operations, logistics systems analysis, freight industry analysis, shipper behavior modeling, freight transportation planning, combinatorial and on-line auction mechanism and algorithm design, transportation economics, data mining, vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to roadside communication systems (VANets), network design under uncertain demand, humanitarian cyber physical systems and cyber physical transportation systems. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Transportation Research Board, JB Hunt, Transportation Inc., the University of California Transportation Centers and the CalTrans PATH program. Regan's research has been published in more than 120 refereed journal articles and conference proceedings papers in Transportation Research (A, B, C and E), Transportation Science, Operations Research, INFOR, the Transportation Research Record, the Transportation Journal, Transportation, Computers and Industrial Engineering, IEEE Network and IIE Transactions, among others. She has been at UCI since 1997 where she has had primary faculty appointments in the Departments of Computer Science and Civil and Environmental Engineering and a courtesy appointment in Paul Merage School of Business (formerly the Graduate School of Management). She was the Associate Dean for Student Affairs for the Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences from 2005-2009. Previously she earned the MS and PhD degrees in Transportation Systems Engineering from the University of Texas, Austin, an MS in Applied Mathematics from the Johns Hopkins University and a BAS in Systems Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. She also worked as a research engineer, software engineer and operations research analyst for the Association of American Railroads and United Parcel Service prior to joining the PhD program at the University of Texas. MIKE ROETH is Executive Director of the North American Council for Freight Efficiency and has worked in the commercial vehicle industry for over 28 years. Mike is also leading the Trucking Efficiency Operations for the Carbon War Room. Mike’s specialty is brokering green truck collaborative technologies into the real world at scale. As Director, Global Advanced Engineering for Navistar International, he led the advanced engineering efforts for the Navistar family of vehicle brands; International trucks, Navistar Defense, IC buses and Workhorse Custom Chassis. These efforts included fuel economy improvement, emissions reductions, driver comfort and efficiency as well as quality, cost and performance breakthroughs. He has a Bachelors of Science in Engineering from the Ohio State University and a Masters in Organizational Leadership from the Indiana Institute of Technology. Mike is a 27 year member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, served as a Board member of the Automotive Industry Action Group and as Chairman of the Board for the Truck Manufacturers Association. He also has been heavily involved with the 21st Century Truck Partnership, a collaborative effort between industry and the United States Government and the Hybrid Truck Users Forum of CALSTART. GARY W. ROGERS is an independent consultant. Previously, he was president, chief executive officer, and sole director, FEV, Inc. His previous positions included director, Power Plant Engineering Services Division, and senior analytical engineer, Failure Analysis Associates, Inc.; design development engineer, Garrett Turbine Engine Company; and Exploration Geophysicist, Shell Oil Company. He has extensive experience in research, design, and development of advanced engine and powertrain systems, including homogeneous and direct-injection gasoline engines, high-speed direction injection passenger car diesel engines, heavy-duty diesel engines, hybrid vehicle systems, gas turbines, pumps, and compressors. He provides corporate leadership for a multinational research, design, and development organization specializing in engines and energy systems. He is a Fellow of the SAE, is an advisor to the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) on heavy-fuel engines, and sits on the President’s Advisory Board of Clemson University and on the advisory board to the College of Engineering and Computer Science, Oakland University. He is currently a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems for the National Academies and has served as a member of the NRC Committee on Review of DOE’s Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies Program, the NRC Committee on the Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards, the NRC Panel on Benefits of DOE’s Light-Duty Hybrid Vehicle R&D Program, the NRC Committee for the Assessment of

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A-6 COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES Technologies for Improving Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy and a Member of the NRC Committee to Review the 21st Century Truck Partnership. He holds a Bachelor of Science (Mechanical Engineering) from Northern Arizona University, and a Master of Engineering (Mechanical Engineering) from the University of Colorado. CHARLES K. SALTER is retired after 39 years with Mack Trucks, Inc/Volvo PowerTrain NA . His experience covers a wide range of heavy-duty diesel engine engineering and development. His most recent positions included Executive Director, Engine Development, where he was responsible for all engine/system functions (design & analysis; emissions control/fuel economy; electronics systems & test). This responsibility included the design & production introduction of the world’s first fully electronically controlled diesel unit injector engine. He was also Executive Director, Advanced Engine Engineering, and collaborated with 3-site (Sweden, France, USA) advanced heavy-duty diesel engine research projects. He jointly initiated (w/ Detroit Diesel) and developed, with EPA & industry, a urea infrastructure for 2007 engine production (then delayed to 2010). He participated in industry collaborative research through the DOE Diesel Crosscut Committee, part of the 21st Century Truck Partnership. He was a consultant to Volvo PowerTrain NA on advanced large truck diesel EGR cooler vibration study/amelioration; on heavy-duty truck hybrid powertrain duty cycle test procedure development for comparative fuel consumption (EPA/industry/HTUF), and a study of regulatory boundaries for the EPA heavy duty truck and engine non-conformance penalty rule. He has served on two National Research Council committees including the Committee to Assess Fuel Economy Technologies for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles and the Committee on Review of the 21st Century Truck Partnership Phase 2. He is a Society of Automotive Engineers member for 47 years and was a board member of Engine Manufacturers Association for 25 years, including a term as President. He was a member of Technology & Maintenance Council of ATA. He holds a bachelor’s of science in mechanical engineering, Penn State University, and a master’s of science in mechanical engineering, solid mechanics, University of Maryland. CHRISTINE VUJOVICH retired in 2009 from Cummins Inc. as its vice president, marketing and environmental policy. During much of her 31 years at Cummins, Mrs. Vujovich served as its environmental policy officer. In the late 1980s, she attended to the heavy-duty engine issues for her company in the reauthorization of the Clean Air Act. She collaborated with other industry representatives to develop industry positions, and worked with Congressional staff to balance new legislative initiatives with technology practicalities. Those initiatives included NOx and particulate requirements for heavy- duty engines. Her experiences with the United States regulatory process aided her similar work in Europe, China and India. She oversaw Cummins’ participation in the development of several automotive regulations for the commercial vehicle and equipment markets, and then oversaw the implementation of these regulations through the technical work inside the company. During her tenure at Cummins, she served terms as Chair for the Engine Manufacturers Association and the Mobile Source Technical Review Subcommittee of the Clear Air Advisory Committee. Since retiring from Cummins, Mrs. Vujovich has co-chaired the Health Effects Institute Special Committee on Emerging Technology whose work culminated in the publication, The Future of Vehicle Fuels and Technologies: Anticipating Health Benefits and Challenges. She has in addition served as adjunct faculty at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Mrs Vujovich has an undergraduate degree in Teaching of the Earth Sciences and a master’s degree in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois. She attended the Yale executive management program. JOHN WOODROOFFE heads the Transportation Safety Analytics and is Director of the Commercial Vehicle Research and Policy Program University of Michigan Transportation Institute (UMTRI). He is responsible for the Center for National Truck and Bus Statistics, which conducts nationwide surveys of Trucks Involved in Fatal Accidents (TIFA) and Buses Involved in Fatal Accidents (BIFA), and the Statistical Analysis Group, which performs analytical modeling and conducts research to advance statistical methods for road and vehicle safety analysis. He is an international expert on policy and safety PREPUBLICATION COPY—SUBJECT TO FURTHER EDITORIAL CORRECTION

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COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES A-7 evaluation of large vehicles in large vehicles including stability and control, accident reconstruction, vehicle productivity, fuel use and environmental impact. He has participated in many large international technical projects and has been a member of vehicle-related OECD technical expert working groups, most recently the OECD / JTRC project entitled “Heavy Vehicles: Regulatory, Operational and Productivity Improvements”. This Paris based International Task Force examined regulatory concepts and future truck technology and for sustainable road transport. Prior to joining UMTRI, Mr. Woodrooffe founded the Road Vehicle Research Program at the National Research Council of Canada and developed it into a successful, internationally-active heavy truck research laboratory. He was a consultant to Australia's National Road Transport Commission for a unique three-year performance-based standards development project that produced a new performance-based regulatory system for large vehicle combinations. Mr. Woodrooffe holds master's and bachelor's degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Ottawa. MARTIN ZIMMERMAN is the Ford Motor Company Clinical Professor of Business Administration at the Ross School of Business of the University of Michigan. His career has spanned academia, government and business. He served as chief economist as well as group vice president at Ford Motor Company, where he was responsible for corporate economics, governmental affairs, environmental and safety engineering and corporate social responsibility. Before joining Ford, he taught at the Sloan School of Management at MIT and at the business school at the University of Michigan. He served on the National Commission on Energy Policy and also served as a Senior Staff Economist on the President's Council of Economic Advisors and as a member of the Panel of Economic Advisors to the Congressional Budget Office. He is presently the Vice-Chair of the Board of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research is concerned with energy policy, government regulation of business and economic developments in the automotive industry. Professor Zimmerman earned a Ph.D. in economics from MIT and the A.B. degree from Dartmouth College.