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Appendix E Speaker Biographical Sketches Carol A. Aschenbrener, M.D., M.S., joined the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in 2004, after nearly 30 years as a medical school faculty member and administrator. After serving for 2 years as vice president of the Division of Medical School Standards and Assessments and LCME Secretary, she assumed leadership of the Division of Medical Education. In 2007, she was appointed to the new role of executive vice president and chief strategy officer. In 2011, she assumed leadership of the newly defined Medical Education Cluster with the goal of developing and implementing a strategy to facilitate transformation of medical education toward a true continuum of formation grounded in the health needs of the public. She has extensive executive experience including 9 years in various Dean’s Office positions at The University of Iowa College of Medicine and 4 years as Chancellor of the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Before joining AAMC, she spent 7 years as a consultant to academic health centers. She has served on a variety of professional and civic boards and has held leadership positions in organized medicine at the state and national level, including terms as appointed member of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, Accreditation Committee for Continuing Medical Education, Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education and elected member of the Iowa Medical Society board, the American Medical Association Council on Medical Education, Educational Commission on Foreign Medical Graduates, and elected chair of the National Board of Medical Examiners. Dr. Aschenbrener holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology from Clarke College in Dubuque, Iowa (1966) and a Master of Science in neuroanatomy from The University of Iowa (1968). She received the M.D. degree from the University of North Carolina (1971) and completed residency training in anatomic pathology and neuropathology at The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (1974). Lesley Bainbridge, M.Ed., Ph.D., holds a bachelor’s of physical therapy, a masters of education, and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. She is the director of interprofessional education in the Faculty of Medicine and Associate Principal College of Health Disciplines at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver. She acted as head of the physical therapy program and interim director of the School of Rehabilitation Sciences prior to her current positions. Her areas of special interest are interprofessional education (IPE), collaborative practice, and other areas related to IPE such as rural health and underserved populations. She has been principal or co- investigator on several Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund grants from UBC, co-lead on Health Canada’s “Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient Centred Practice” project in BC, and co-investigator on several other research grants related to IPE, health human resources, and shared decision making. Dr. Bainbridge served as president of the Accreditation Council of Canadian Physiotherapy Academic Programs (ACCPAP) from 2001 to 2009 and is currently serving as past-president. She represents ACCPAP on a national committee developing accreditation standards for IPE and is co-chair of a working group developing a national competency framework for interprofessional collaboration. She received a Killam Teaching E-1 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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Prize at UBC for excellence in teaching and the Enid Graham Memorial Lecture Award for leadership in the profession by the Canadian Physiotherapy Association. David P. Baker, Ph.D., is senior vice president of the Health Division at IMPAQ International, LLC. The IMPAQ Health Division conducts program and impact evaluations and provides technical assistance to federal agencies such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the National Institutes of Health, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Previously, Dr. Baker served as director of the Health Services Research Institute at Carilion Clinic and also held appointments as an associate professor on the founding faculty for the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (VTCSOM) and with the American Institutes for Research (AIR). For the past 10 years, Dr. Baker has been actively involved in AHRQ’s efforts to develop and deploy TeamSTEPPS training for health care professionals. Dr. Baker has led or contributed to: the Program Evaluation of Medical Team Training in the Department of Defense (DoD); Development and Testing of a Rapid Response Team Training module within the TeamSTEPPS Curriculum; Support of the DoD Health Care Team Coordination Program to Evaluate TeamSTEPPS; the TeamSTEPPS Collaborative; the National Implementation of TeamSTEPPS; and Implementing TeamSTEPPS in Primary Care Settings. In addition to his work for AHRQ and DoD, Dr. Baker has completed a number of projects for the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, U.S. Navy, and U.S. airlines over the course of his 20-year career. These projects all center on understanding, training, and measuring the performance of teams. Dr. Baker is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. He holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from the University of South Florida. Juanita Bezuidenhout, M.B.Ch.B., M.Med., Ph.D., is a professor of anatomical pathology and deputy director, research, in the Centre for Health Professions Education, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University and National Health Laboratory Service, South Africa. She is involved in service, under- and postgraduate education, and research in the university and nationally. She is a Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education Research (FAIMER) fellow and co-director of the Sub-Saharan Africa FAIMER Regional Institute, focusing on capacity development in health professions education in sub- Saharan Africa. She is deputy editor of the African Journal of Health Professions Education and a regular reviewer for both pathology and health professions education journals. She is an active member of the South African Association of Health Educationalists. Darla Spence Coffey, M.S.W., Ph.D. (Forum Member), assumed the duties of Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) president in July 2012. Prior to her appointment as president, she served as professor of social work, associate provost, and dean of graduate studies at West Chester University. She was a member of the social work faculty at West Chester University beginning in 1998, where she contributed to the initial accreditation of the MSW program in 2000 and served as the director and chair of the university’s undergraduate social work program from 2002 to 2005. Since 2005, Dr. Coffey has served in senior university administrative capacities, providing leadership for academic program development, curriculum, academic policies, assessment of student learning, transfer articulation, accreditation, and faculty development. During the 2008–2009 academic year, she served West Chester University as E-2 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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interim provost/vice president for academic affairs. Dr. Coffey has an extensive background in social work practice in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence. After years of working with and researching the effects of domestic violence on children, Dr. Coffey developed a curriculum, Parenting After Violence, and trained cohorts of social workers in the child welfare system in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in its implementation. As a long-time member of CSWE, she has served on the Council on Leadership Development and the Commission on Educational Policy. Dr. Coffey is a member of the National Association of Social Workers and the Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors, where she served on the Executive Committee from 2005–2009. She has also served on numerous community boards that provide services to women and children, and is currently a national advisor to the Institute for Safe Families in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Coffey received her bachelor’s degree from Eastern College, her M.S.W. from the University of Pennsylvania, and her Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research Jordan J. Cohen, M.D. (Forum Co-Chair), is professor of medicine and public health at George Washington University and president emeritus of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). He also serves as chairman of the board of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation for Humanism in Medicine. As president and chief executive officer of the AAMC from 1994 to 2006, Dr. Cohen led the association’s support and service to the nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals. He launched new initiatives in each of the association’s mission areas of education, research, and patient care; expanded and modernized the AAMC’s services for medical students, applicants, residents, and constituents; strengthened the association’s communications, advocacy, and data-gathering efforts; and established many initiatives for improving medical education and clinical care. Prior to his leadership of the AAMC, he served as dean of the medical school and professor of medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and as president of the medical staff at University Hospital. Before that, Dr. Cohen was professor and associate chairman of medicine at the University of Chicago-Pritzker School of Medicine and physician-in-chief and chairman of the department of medicine at the Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center. Dr. Cohen currently serves on the board of the Morehouse School of Medicine and the Qatar Foundation for Education, Science & Community Development. He chairs the National Academic Affiliations Council of the Veterans Administration. He is a former chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine and of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, served as president of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine, was a member of the Board of Directors of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation of New York and the National Library of Medicine, and served as chair of the Journal Oversight Committee of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Cohen is a graduate of Yale University and Harvard Medical School and completed his postgraduate training in internal medicine on the Harvard service at the Boston City Hospital. He also completed a fellowship in nephrology at the Tufts-New England Medical Center. Margaret Crump, M.P.H., joined the American Nurse Practitioner Foundation (ANPF) in April 2010. Mrs. Crump works to manage general operations and is responsible for execution of organizational programs and activities. Prior to joining ANPF, Mrs. Crump most recently worked for the University of Tulsa Department of Nursing and served as Senior Vice President E-3 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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of Community Initiatives and Advocacy at the American Lung Association of Central States. Before that, she implemented health care software and worked in corporate wellness for the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research. She specializes in strategic planning, program implementation, consolidation of operations, and development. Mrs. Crump is a graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University with a Bachelors of Science in Exercise Science Sports Medicine. She earned her M.P.H. from the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center. Jan De Maeseneer, M.D., Ph.D., FRCGP (Hon) (Forum Member), earned his M.D. from Ghent University in Belgium in 1977. He has been working part-time as a family physician in the community health center Botermarkt in Ledeberg, a deprived area in the city of Ghent. Since 2008, Jan has served as vice-dean for strategic planning at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is board member of the Interuniversity Flemish Consortium for vocational training of family medicine and he chairs the working party for family medicine of the Belgian High Council for medical specialists and family physicians. Professor De Maeseneer chairs the Educational Committee (since 1997) and directs a fundamental reform of the undergraduate curriculum (from a discipline-based toward an integrated patient-based approach). In 2004 Professor De Maeseneer received the WONCA-award for excellence in health care: the Five-Star Doctor at the 17th World Conference of Family Doctors in Orlando (USA). In 2008 he received a Doctor Honoris Causa degree at the Universidad Mayor de San Simon in Cochabamba (Bolivia). In 2010, he received the prize De Schaepdrijver-Caenepeel for developmental work from the Royal Flemish Academy of Medicine. Rishi Desai, M.D., M.P.H., is currently a medical educator at the Khan Academy, a free online education platform and nonprofit organization. As the team lead for medical partnerships at the Khan Academy, Dr. Desai brings his expertise in pediatric infectious diseases and public health to the Academy’s roughly 7 million unique users per month. Dr. Desai has worked with multiple medical schools to implement online video-based content directly into their curriculum. Dr. Desai is a pediatric infectious disease physician who has mentored trainees at every stage of his career. He has been awarded numerous teaching accolades and his passion for teaching eventually brought him to the Khan Academy. In his early years, Dr. Desai had an accelerated early education, completing high school and receiving his B.S. in microbiology from University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), by the age of 18. He completed his medical training at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and went on to work at prestigious medical centers including those affiliated with Harvard University, Boston University, University of Southern California, and Stanford University. He returned to UCLA to earn his M.P.H. in epidemiology, and then spent 2 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an Epidemic Intelligence Officer investigating disease outbreaks. Jody S. Frost, P.T., D.P.T., Ph.D., is the lead academic affairs specialist and program director, Education Leadership Institute Fellowship, in the Department of Academic Services at the American Physical Therapy Association. Dr. Frost is responsible for facilitating physical therapist academic/clinical education, professionalism, interprofessional education (IPE), and higher education leadership initiatives. She has been involved in facilitating initiatives including the development of Normative Curricular Models of Physical Therapist (PT) and Physical E-4 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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Therapist Assistant (PTA) Education, Clinical Instructor Education and Credentialing Programs, Clinical Performance Instruments for PT and PTA students, Clinical Site Information Form Web, Professionalism in Physical Therapy: Core Values, online physical therapy professionalism module series, Interprofessional Professionalism Collaborative, and interprofessional education. She received her doctor of physical therapy degree from Marymount University, her Ph.D. from Temple University, her master’s in counseling and personnel studies from Glassboro State College, and her bachelor’s in physical therapy from Ithaca College. Dr. Frost was formerly an assistant chair/faculty member at Temple University and a clinical manager, teacher, and practitioner in pediatric and orthopedic/sports medicine facilities. She has presented at numerous conferences on academic and clinical education, professionalism and interprofessional professionalism, performance assessment, mentoring, strategic planning and facilitation, and interprofessional education. She also provides consultation as an expert facilitator for strategic planning and consensus building. Her published works focus on interprofessional professionalism, professionalism, clinical education assessments, academic and clinical teaching, and mentoring. Martha (Meg) Gaines, J.D., L.L.M., is the associate dean for academic affairs and experiential learning at the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she has served as a clinical professor of law for 25 years. She is also founding director of the interdisciplinary Center for Patient Partnerships, which trains future professionals in medicine, nursing, law, health systems, industrial engineering, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other disciplines that provide advocacy services to patients with life-threatening and serious chronic illnesses. Ms. Gaines teaches courses related to consumer issues in health care advocacy to graduate students pursuing various health professions and law. Following her graduation from law school, she served as a law clerk to the late Honorable Thomas Tang, 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, and as a trial attorney for the Wisconsin State Public Defender. Barbara Gawron, R.N., D.N.P., CHSE, is a nursing educator with a concentrated focus in simulation instructional methods for prelicensure students for the past 7 years. She is currently the director of Simulation Learning Experiences and a faculty member at Saint Xavier University College of Nursing working with prelicensure and Nurse Practitioner students. Her current research addresses the assessment methods for simulation evaluation and its impact on the cognitive level of learning. In May of 2013 she became a Certified Healthcare Simulation Expert by the Society of Simulation in Healthcare. Catherine L. Grus, Ph.D., is the deputy executive director for education at the American Psychological Association (APA) and has been on the staff of the APA since 2005. Dr. Grus received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Nova University in 1993. She completed a doctoral internship at the University of Miami School of Medicine and a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Grus works to advance policies and practices that promote high-quality education and training at the doctoral, postdoctoral, and postlicensure levels. She serves as a liaison to numerous national, interorganizational, and interprofessional education and training groups. Areas of focus for Dr. Grus include the E-5 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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development of models and tools for competency assessment in professional psychology, supervision, and primary care psychology practice. Eric Holmboe, M.D. (Forum Member), a board certified internist, is chief medical officer and senior vice president of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ABIM Foundation. He is also professor adjunct of medicine at Yale University, and adjunct professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Previously, he was associate program director, Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program, and director of Student Clinical Assessment, Yale School of Medicine. Before joining Yale, he was division chief of general internal medicine at the National Naval Medical Center. His research interests include interventions to improve quality of care and methods in the evaluation of clinical competence. Dr. Holmboe is a consultant for the Drug Safety and Risk Management Subcommittee of the Pharmaceutical Science Advisory Committee for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and an honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in London. Dr. Holmboe is a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College and the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He completed his residency and chief residency at Yale-New Haven Hospital, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Yale University. Jehu E. Iputo, M.B.Ch.B., Ph.D., is the director of the School of Medicine at Walter Sisulu University (WSU) in South Africa where he has taught for more than 25 years. He studied human medicine at Makerere University and physiology at Trinity College in Dublin. Prior to taking up his current post, he was professor of physiology and chairman of the Department of Physiology and Medical Biochemistry at WSU. Dr. Iputo has played a pivotal role in the establishment of the problem-based and community-based medical training program at WSU, one of the leading innovative programs in Sub-Saharan Africa. He has been involved in medical and nursing curricula reform in Ghana, South Africa, and Uganda. Dr. Iputo is a member of THEnet and of the Network-Towards Unity for Health. He has published on medical education and has served on the editorial boards of several journals including the South African Medical Journal. He has consulted for the WHO on medical education and served on the WHO Technical Committee on Transformative Medical Education. Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H. (IOM Board on Global Health Director), joined the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2003 as director of the Board on Global Health. He has also been appointed director of the Board on African Science Academy Development. Dr. Kelley has overseen a portfolio of IOM expert consensus studies and convened activities on subjects as wide-ranging as the evaluation of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the U.S. commitment to global health, sustainable surveillance for zoonotic infections, cardiovascular disease prevention in low- and middle-income countries, interpersonal violence prevention in low- and middle-income countries, and microbial threats to health. He also directs a unique capacity-building effort, the African Science Academy Development Initiative, which over 10 years aims to strengthen the capacity of eight African academies to provide independent, evidence-based advice to their governments on scientific matters. Prior to joining the National Academies, Dr. Kelley served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. E-6 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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John (Jack) R. Kues, Ph.D., M.A. (Forum Member), graduated with a B.S. degree in psychology and a B.A. degree in sociology from Northern Kentucky University. He earned his M.A. degree in sociology and Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Cincinnati. He is associate dean for Continuous Professional Development and professor emeritus at the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center where he is responsible for continuing medical education and continuing interprofessional education. He is also the project evaluator for the UC Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Kues is currently the president of the Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions (ACEHP). He is a past president of the Society for Academic CME (SACME), where he has also chaired the Research Endowment Council, the Research Committee, and the Communications Committee. He is a past chair of the CME Section of the AAMC Group on Educational Affairs (GEA). Dr. Kues has been an active volunteer for SACME, the Alliance, ACCME, and other organizations. Lucy Mac Gabhann, J.D., M.H.S., is an attorney with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the General Counsel (HHS OGC), where she practices in the area of government contracts. She obtained her law degree at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law where she also received a Certificate in Health Law and Policy. During law school she interned at HHS OGC, as well as the U.S. House of Representatives, the Mississippi Center for Justice, and the University of Maryland Global Health Resource Center in Malawi. As part of the interdisciplinary research team in Malawi, she collaborated with students and faculty from the Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work to investigate health care access and utilization in a rural, malaria-endemic area. Prior to entering the field of law, Ms. Mac Gabhann worked for 10 years in domestic and international vaccine development and production, first as a researcher in academia in enteric diseases, then as a project manager in biodefense vaccines for the Department of Defense (DoD) and HHS. She earned a B.S. in zoology from Louisiana State University and an M.S. in international health from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health and Hygiene. Lemmietta G. McNeilly, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CAE (Forum Member), serves on American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (ASHA’s) Facilitating Team as the chief staff officer, Speech-Language Pathology, and is responsible for the following units: Governmental Relations and Public Policy, Speech-Language Pathology Practices units (Clinical Issues, Health Care and School Services), Special Interest Groups, and International Programs. She is a fellow of the ASHA and a Certified Association Executive. She serves as Chair of the American Society of Association Executives International Section Council and a Diversity Executive Leadership Scholar (DELP). She also serves as Secretary/Treasurer of the National Coalition of Health Care Professionals (NCHPEG) Executive Board and member of the Executive Committee. She serves as the ex-officio for ASHA’s International Issues Board, Health Care Landscape Summit, and the Speech-Language Pathology Advisory Council. Previous appointments include serving as the founding chair of the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Florida International University. E-7 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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Afaf I. Meleis, Ph.D., Dr.P.S. (Hon), FAAN (Forum Co-chair), is the Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) School of Nursing, professor of nursing and sociology, and director of the school’s World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Nursing and Midwifery Leadership. Before going to Penn, she was a professor on the faculty of nursing at University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, San Francisco for 34 years. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Nursing in the UK, the American Academy of Nursing, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar National Advisory Committee, the George W. Bush Presidential Center Women’s Initiative Policy Advisory Council; a trustee of the National Health Museum; a board member of CARE, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Macy Faculty Scholars program, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health; and chair of the IOM Global Forum on Innovation for Health Professional Education. Dr. Meleis is also President and Council General Emerita of the International Council on Women's Health Issues and currently serves as the global ambassador for the Girl Child Initiative of the International Council of Nurses. Dr. Meleis graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Alexandria (1961), earned an M.S. in nursing (1964), an M.A. in sociology (1966) and a Ph.D. in medical and social psychology (1968) from UCLA. John J. Norcini, Ph.D., is president and CEO of the Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER). FAIMER has an active research program on international health professions education and physician migration, global fellowship programs for faculty from health professions schools, and databases of recognized medical schools around the world. For the 25 years before joining the Foundation, Dr. Norcini held a number of senior positions at the American Board of Internal Medicine. His principal academic interest is in the assessment of physician performance. Dr. Norcini has published extensively, lectured and taught in many countries, and is on the editorial boards of several peer-reviewed journals in educational measurement and medical education. Bjorg Palsdottir, M.P.A., co-founded Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet) in 2008. Ms. Palsdottir served as a consultant to organizations, governments, and institutions such as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, and the World Bank. She co-founded and was associate director of the Center for Global Health at New York University School of Medicine, established in 1998. Prior to working for the center, Ms. Palsdottir worked for the International Rescue Committee, an emergency relief and development organization, first at headquarters in New York, then as a Regional Coordinator for East and Central Africa. She holds a bachelor of the arts in economic journalism, a master’s degree in public administration and non-profit management from New York University’s (NYU’s) Wagner School of Public Service, and a certificate in training and organizational development from NYU. Aliye Runyan, M.D., is an education and research fellow at the American Medical Student Association (AMSA). She graduated with honors in literature and biology from Eckerd College, and is a 2012 graduate of the University of Miami-Miller (UM-Miller) School of Medicine. Runyan has held national coordinator positions within the Humanistic Medicine, Wellness and Student Life, Medical Professionalism, and Medical Education action committees at AMSA, and E-8 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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was immediate past National Chair of the Medical Education team. She is the founder, and director from 2008-2011, of the AMSA Medical Humanities Scholars Program. With guidance and inspiration from her leadership roles, she successfully implemented the Ethics and Humanities Pathway at the University of Miami with students and faculty, and coordinated the first ever Florida medical school-wide ethics and humanities student conference this past May at the University of South Florida (USF), in partnership with USF and UM-Miller faculty. She was her class president for two years in medical school, and sat on the Board of Trustees for the University of Miami as a student representative. Nelson K. Sewankambo, M.B.Ch.B., M.Sc., M.M.Ed., FRCP Doctor of Laws (HC) (Forum Member), trained in general medicine and internal medicine at Makerere University (MU) in Uganda and later graduated with a degree in clinical epidemiology from McMaster University, Canada. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, UK, a professor of medicine at MU, and is the principal (head) of Makerere University College of Health Sciences. He was dean of Makerere University Medical School for 11 years (until 2007). He contributed to the seminal work of the Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (2008–2010). As co-chair of the education/production subcommittee of the Joint Learning Initiative, he contributed to the landmark report titled Human Resources for Health; Overcoming the Crisis, which had a major influence on the World Health Organization’s 2006 report Together for Health, which focused on the global crisis of health workers and the need for urgent action to enhance health of populations. Maria Tassone, M.Sc., B.Sc.P.T., is the inaugural director of the Centre for Interprofessional Education, a strategic partnership between the University of Toronto and the University Health Network. She is also the senior director of health professions and interprofessional care and integration at the University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto, a network of four hospitals comprising Toronto General, Toronto Western, Toronto Rehab, and Princess Margaret. Ms. Tassone holds a B.S. in physical therapy from McGill University and an M.Sc. from the University of Western Ontario, and she is an assistant professor in the department of physical therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto. Ms. Tassone was the UHN project lead for the coaching arm of the Catalyzing and Sustaining Communities of Collaboration around Interprofessional Care, which was recently awarded the Ontario Hospital Association international Ted Freedman Award for Education Innovation. Sarita Verma, L.L.B., M.B., CCFP (Forum Member), is a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine, deputy dean of the Faculty of Medicine, and associate vice provost for health professions education at the University of Toronto (U of T). She has been a diplomat in Canada’s foreign service and worked with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Sudan and Ethiopia for several years. Dr. Verma is the 2006 recipient of the Donald Richards Wilson Award in medical education from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the 2009 co-recipient of the May Cohen Gender Equity Award from the Association of Faculties of Medicine in Canada. Along with colleagues at McGill University, the University of British Columbia, and U of T, she has been the lead consultant for the Future of Medical Education in Canada–Postgraduate Project on the Liaison E-9 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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and Engagement Strategy and the Environmental Scan Scientific Study. As deputy dean, Dr. Verma leads strategic planning and implementation as well as communications and external relations. In addition, she is responsible for integrated education across the health sciences and liaison with affiliated partners. Patricia Hinton Walker, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN (Forum Member), has held national prominence as leader in the health care and health sciences education for more than 25 years as a school of nursing dean, CNO in hospital and community-based care, and in the Health IT/Technology and Policy arenas. She serves as Senior Advisor to the TIGER (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) Initiative Foundation. She is currently Vice President for Policy and Strategic Initiatives at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences where she previously served as Dean. In 2001, she was Senior Scholar in Residence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) focusing on cost and quality outcomes, as well as patient safety research. Currently she serves as an internal coach and consultant on Patient Safety and TeamSTEPPS to the DoD Patient Safety Program within Tricare Management Activity (a component of the Military Health Care System). In addition to her professional nursing career, Dr. Hinton Walker became President and Founder of Hinton Walker Associates in the 1980s and has recently added a coaching practice and teaching in an International Coaching Federation (ICF) approved program for health professionals to this already established organizational development, educational consultation business. John Weeks has been involved in the integrative healthcare movement for 28 years in various capacities as writer, organizer, speaker and executive. He has consulted on integrative projects with such organizations as the American Heart Association/Health Forum, National Institutes of Health, Institute for Health and Productivity Management, and Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner, and with integrative medicine programs at the universities of Arizona, Maryland, Stanford, and Washington. Also in the academic realm, Weeks served in the 1980s as a vice president for what is now Bastyr University, directed the 12-profession National Education Dialogue to Advance Integrated Care: Creating Common Ground (2004-2005), and cofounded and presently directs the Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care (ACCAHC). Since the mid-1990s, Weeks has produced the principal newsletter on policy and business of integration, now via the Integrator Blog News & Reports (www.theintegratorblog.com). He produces related columns for IntegrativePractitioner.com, Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal, The Pain Practitioner (American Association of Physicists in Medicine), and the Huffington Post. Weeks attended Stanford University for three years, studying history. He has twice been granted honorary doctorates for his work. Karen Anne Wolf, Ph.D., R.N., is chair of the National Academies of Practice-Nursing Academy, and served as the chair of the Interprofessional Standards Task Force. Currently a professor and coordinator for faculty development at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland California, Dr. Wolf is a 2011-2012 fellow in the Stanford University ethnogeriatrics faculty development program and a faculty member in the University of California, Berkeley, Interdisciplinary Team Training Course. Dr. Wolf is an advanced practice nurse (nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist) with over thirty years of practice in the care of older E-10 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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adults and vulnerable populations in community primary care, home care, and long-term care settings. An advocate for open access and use of technologies to reach nursing and health care providers, she was a consultant to a such media projects as the PeRX project on safe prescribing, Community Voices, OurBodiesOurselves Website, and Nursetogether. Brenda Zierler, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN (Forum Member), is professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Washington (UW), but she holds three adjunct appointments—two in the School of Medicine and one in the School of Public Health. Dr. Zierler’s research explores the relationships between the delivery of health care and outcomes—at both the patient and system level. She is the Inaugural UW Health Science’s IPE Faculty Scholar (2013–2015). Dr. Zierler is co-PI of a Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation grant focused on faculty development for interprofessional education and collaborative practice. She currently leads two Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) training grants, one focusing on faculty development in the use of technology across a five-state collaborative and the second grant focusing on technology- enhanced IPE for advanced practice students. She is co-director for the UW Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, Practice and Research and associate-director of the UW Institute for Simulation and Interprofessional Studies (ISIS) in the School of Medicine. Dr. Zierler was a fellow in the RWJ Nurse Executive Program (2008–2011). Sanjay Zodpey, M.D., Ph.D. (Forum Member), presently works as director of public health education at the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), New Delhi, and holds a leadership role as director at Indian Institutes of Public Health, Delhi. Dr. Zodpey also served as director of Indian Institute of Public Health, Gandhinagar and Bhubaneswar. He earlier worked as professor of preventive and social medicine and vice dean at Government Medical College, Nagpur. By training, he is a physician, public health specialist, and epidemiologist. Dr. Zodpey completed his medical education—MBBS, M.D., and Ph.D. (preventive and social medicine)—from Government Medical College, Nagpur, India. He has also acquired postgraduate qualifications in sociology, public administration, and economics. He has been awarded a fellowship of the Indian Public Health Association and the Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine. Dr. Zodpey is involved in designing several capacity development initiatives, including long-term academic programs at PHFI. He is currently leading the project supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development for designing human resources for health (HRH) policy for the Government of Jharkhand (India). He is also providing leadership to Technical Assistance Project of Madhya Pradesh (India) for creating a public health cadre in the state. He has recently authored two monographs related to education of health professionals in India. He also leads the Cluster for Health Workforce (with focus on education of health professionals) established at PHFI (IIPH, Delhi) in 2010. E-11 PREPUBLICATION COPY: UNCORRECTED PROOFS

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