10

Closing Remarks

Those attending the workshop and watching on the webcast have many different backgrounds and perspectives, said Bill Purcell, chair of the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, in his closing remarks at the workshop. But they have a common goal—reducing obesity and improving the health of Americans—and that shared goal will shape actions going forward. Much of what needs to be done is clear, he said. The challenge now is to figure out how to do what needs to be done.

The work of the roundtable represents “a new adventure and a new set of opportunities,” said Purcell. The roundtable seeks to use the knowledge that exists today to extend and accelerate progress while pursuing the new knowledge that will make a difference in the future. Preventing and treating obesity is some of “the most important work going on” in America today, Purcell concluded, which will motivate and inspire the roundtable’s future efforts.



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10 Closing Remarks Those attending the workshop and watching on the webcast have many different backgrounds and perspectives, said Bill Purcell, chair of the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, in his closing remarks at the workshop. But they have a common goal—reducing obesity and improving the health of Americans—and that shared goal will shape actions going forward. Much of what needs to be done is clear, he said. The challenge now is to figure out how to do what needs to be done. The work of the roundtable represents “a new adventure and a new set of opportunities,” said Purcell. The roundtable seeks to use the knowledge that exists today to extend and accelerate progress while pursuing the new knowledge that will make a difference in the future. Preventing and treating obesity is some of “the most important work going on” in America today, Purcell concluded, which will motivate and inspire the roundtable’s future efforts. 61

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