A

Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

DAVID CLARK, Chair, is a senior research scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, where he has worked since receiving his Ph.D. there in 1973. Since the mid-1970s, Clark has been leading the development of the Internet; from 1981 to 1989 he acted as chief protocol architect in this development, and he chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research looks at redefinition of the architectural underpinnings of the Internet and at the relationship of technology and architecture to economic, societal, and policy considerations. He is helping the U.S. National Science Foundation organize its Future Internet Design program. Clark is past chair of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council and has contributed to a number of studies on the societal and policy impact of computer communications. He is co-director of the MIT Communications Futures program, a project for industry collaboration and coordination along the communications value chain.

THOMAS BERSON is founder and president of Anagram Laboratories and a visiting scholar at Stanford University. He has been a researcher at IBM Research and at Xerox PARC and has been successful as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur three times. He is attracted most strongly to security issues raised at the confluence of technology, business, and world events. Berson is a student of Sun Tzu’s Art of War and its applicability to modern information conflict. Berson was the first person to be named a fellow of



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A Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS DAVID CLARK, Chair, is a senior research scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, where he has worked since receiving his Ph.D. there in 1973. Since the mid-1970s, Clark has been leading the development of the Internet; from 1981 to 1989 he acted as chief protocol architect in this development, and he chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research looks at redefinition of the architec- tural underpinnings of the Internet and at the relationship of technology and architecture to economic, societal, and policy considerations. He is helping the U.S. National Science Foundation organize its Future Internet Design program. Clark is past chair of the Computer Science and Tele- communications Board of the National Research Council and has contrib- uted to a number of studies on the societal and policy impact of computer communications. He is co-director of the MIT Communications Futures program, a project for industry collaboration and coordination along the communications value chain. THOMAS BERSON is founder and president of Anagram Laboratories and a visiting scholar at Stanford University. He has been a researcher at IBM Research and at Xerox PARC and has been successful as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur three times. He is attracted most strongly to security issues raised at the confluence of technology, business, and world events. Berson is a student of Sun Tzu’s Art of War and its applicability to modern information conflict. Berson was the first person to be named a fellow of 129

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130 AT THE NEXUS OF CYBERSECURITY AND PUBLIC POLICY the International Association for Cryptologic Research. His citation reads, “For visionary and essential service and for numerous valuable contribu- tions to the technical, social, and commercial development of cryptology and security.” Berson was an editor of the Journal of Cryptology for 14 years. He is a past chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Security and Privacy and a past president of the International Association for Cryp- tologic Research. Berson has been a member of three previous National Research Council committees: the Committee on Computer Security in the Department of Energy, the Committee to Review DoD C4I Plans and Programs, and the Committee on Offensive Information Warfare. Berson earned a B.S. in physics from the State University of New York in 1967 and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of London in 1977. He was a visiting fellow in mathematics in the University of Cambridge, and he is a life member of Clare Hall, Cambridge. Berson’s Erdös number is 2; his amateur radio call sign is ND2T. MARJORY BLUMENTHAL1 became executive director of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) in May 2013, after a decade combining academic leadership at Georgetown University with research and advisory activities (including as a RAND adjunct) aimed at understanding Internet and cybersecurity technology trends and policy implications. She stewards the council and its program of analyses (spanning science and technology) that culminate in policy recommen- dations to the President and the Administration. In fall 2013, PCAST published Immediate Opportunities for Strengthening the Nation’s Cybersecu- rity. Blumenthal joined Georgetown University in August 2003 as associ- ate provost, academic, engaging in campus-wide strategy and oversee- ing academic units and special initiatives. She led efforts to strengthen Georgetown sciences (culminating in the 2012 opening of a new science building and launch of a new computer science Ph.D. program), and she promoted innovation in teaching, launching Online@GU and co- developing the Initiative for Technology-Enhanced Learning. Between July 1987 and August 2003, Blumenthal was the director of the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB). Several of the more than 60 reports produced with her leader- ship affected public policy and/or became trade books. Her cybersecurity work began with CSTB’s influential Computers at Risk. Blumenthal did her undergraduate work at Brown University and received her M.S. in public policy at Harvard University. 1 Ms. Blumenthal resigned from the committee on May 1, 2013.

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APPENDIX A 131 STAFF HERBERT S. LIN is chief scientist at the Computer Science and Telecom- munications Board, National Research Council of the National Academies, where he has been the study director of major projects on public policy and information technology. These projects include a number of studies related to cybersecurity: Cryptography’s Role in Securing the Information Society (1996); Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges (1999); Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age (2007); Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace (2007); Technology, Policy, Law, and Eth- ics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities (2009); and Proceedings of a Workshop on Deterring Cyberattacks: Informing Strategies and Developing Options (2010). Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. He received his doctorate in physics from MIT. ERIC WHITAKER is a senior program assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. Prior to joining the CSTB, he was a realtor with Long and Foster Real Estate, Inc., in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. Before that, he spent several years with the Public Broadcasting Service in Alexandria, Virginia, as an associate in the Corporate Support Department. He has a B.A. in com- munication from Hampton University.