References

1.     Adams, S. 2012. Workshop presentation to the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States, on the Larkin Street Youth Services, May 9, San Francisco, CA.

2.     Walts, K. K., S. French, H. Moore, and S. Ashai. 2011. Building child welfare response to child trafficking. Chicago, IL: Loyola University Chicago, Center for the Human Rights of Children.

3.     Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Fact sheet: How the child welfare system works. https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/cpswork.pdf (accessed April 25, 2013).

4.     Dorsey, S., S. E. U. Kerns, E. W. Trupin, K. L. Conover, and L. Berliner. 2012. Child welfare caseworkers as service brokers for youth in foster care: Findings from Project Focus. Child Maltreatment 17(1):22-31.

5.     Piening, S., and T. Cross. 2012. From “the life” to my life: Sexually exploited children reclaiming their futures. Suffolk County Massachusetts’ response to commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC). Boston, MA: Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County.

6.     Wilson, J. M., and E. Dalton. 2008. Human trafficking in the heartland. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 24(3):296-313.

7.     HHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 2012. Services available to victims of human trafficking: A resource guide for social service providers. Washington, DC: HHS.

8.     My Life, My Choice. 2012. Preventing the exploitation of girls: A groundbreaking curriculum. Boston, MA: Justice Research Institute.

9.     Goldblatt Grace, L. 2012. Site visit presentation to the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States, on My Life, My Choice, March 23, Boston, MA.



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References   1. Adams, S. 2012. Workshop presentation to the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States, on the Larkin Street Youth Services, May 9, San Francisco, CA.   2. Walts, K. K., S. French, H. Moore, and S. Ashai. 2011. Building child welfare response to child trafficking. Chicago, IL: Loyola University Chicago, Center for the Human Rights of Children.  3. Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Fact sheet: How the child welfare system works. https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/cpswork.pdf (accessed April 25, 2013).   4. Dorsey, S., S. E. U. Kerns, E. W. Trupin, K. L. Conover, and L. Berliner. 2012. Child welfare caseworkers as service brokers for youth in foster care: Findings from Project Focus. Child Maltreatment 17(1):22-31.   5. Piening, S., and T. Cross. 2012. From “the life” to my life: Sexually exploited children reclaiming their futures. Suffolk County Massachusetts’ response to commercial sexual ex- ploitation of children (CSEC). Boston, MA: Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County.   6. Wilson, J. M., and E. Dalton. 2008. Human trafficking in the heartland. Journal of Con- temporary Criminal Justice 24(3):296-313.   7. HHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 2012. Services available to vic- tims of human trafficking: A resource guide for social service providers. Washington, DC: HHS.   8. My Life, My Choice. 2012. Preventing the exploitation of girls: A groundbreaking curricu- lum. Boston, MA: Justice Research Institute.   9. Goldblatt Grace, L. 2012. Site visit presentation to the Committee on the Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States, on My Life, My Choice, March 23, Boston, MA. 45

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