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Prepu Prepub cblication C Copy proo ublication copy, uncorr rected ofs Uncor rrected Pr roofs STE Learnin is E EM L ng Everyw e: where Summa of a Con ation o Building S ary f nvoca on Learnin Sys L ng stems Steve Olson and Jay Labov, Rapporteurs rs Planning Co P ommittee on STEM Lear rning is Ever rywhere: Engaging Schools and Empowe a ering Teache to Integr Formal, Informal, an After-School ers rate nd h Edducation to Enhance Tea E aching and L Learning In GGrades K-8 Teacher Advisory Co A ouncil Division of Behavioral an Social Sc D B nd ciences and E Education ADVAN NCE CO OPY NOT FOR PUBL RELEASE BEFORE O LIC Tuesday June 3, 2014 y, , 9:00 a.m. EDT

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. This project was supported by the Samueli Foundation and by Grant #1012954 of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project. International Standard Book Number 0-309-XXXXX-X (Book) International Standard Book Number 0-309-XXXXX-X (PDF) Additional copies of this report are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu. Copyright 2014 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America Suggested citation: National Research Council. (2014). STEM Learning is Everywhere: Summary of a Convocation on Building Learning Systems. Planning Committee on STEM Learning is Everywhere: Engaging Schools and Empowering Teachers to Integrate Formal, Informal, and After- School Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning In Grades K-8, Teacher Advisory Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. ii

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Prepu ublication copy, uncorr c rected proo ofs The Nation Academy of Sciences is a private, nonpr nal o rofit, self-perpet tuating society of distinguished scholars enga d aged in scientific an engineering research, dedica nd ated to the furthherance of scien and technology and to the use for the g nce eir general welfare. Up the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Acad pon y g n demy has a man ndate that requir it to res advise the federal governme on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralp J. Cicerone is president of the National Acad f ent m ph s e demy of Sciences. The Nation Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under t charter of th National Acad nal f w i the he demy of Science as a es, parallel orga anization of outs standing enginee It is autonom ers. mous in its admi inistration and in the selection o its members, s n of sharing with the National Academ of Sciences the responsibilit for advising the federal gov my t ty vernment. The National Acade emy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting natio g a onal needs, enc courages educat tion and researc and ch, recognizes the superior achi t ievements of eng gineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is pr D resident of the N National Academ of Engineerin my ng. The Institu of Medicine was established in 1970 by th National Aca ute e he ademy of Scien nces to secure th services of e he eminent members of appropriate pro f ofessions in the examination of policy matters p e p pertaining to the health of the pu ublic. The Institu acts ute under the re esponsibility giv to the Nation Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal ven nal f s n government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fine t o o s e, d eberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. f The National Research Co ouncil was organ nized by the Nattional Academy of Sciences in 1 1916 to associate the broad com e mmunity of science and technology with the Aca y ademy’s purpose of furthering knowledge an advising the federal gover es g nd e rnment. Functioning in accordance with general po g olicies determine by the Acade ed emy, the Counc has become t principal op cil the perating agency of both the Nation Academy of Sciences and the National Ac b nal f cademy of Eng oviding services to the gineering in pro government the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. T Council is ad t, d a The dministered join by both Aca ntly ademies and the Institute of Medicin Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr C. D. Mote, Jr. are chair and v chair, respectively, of the N ne. C r. ., vice National Research Co ouncil. www.natio onal-academie es.org iii

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs PLANNING COMMITTEE ON STEM LEARNING IS EVERYWHERE: ENGAGING SCHOOLS AND EMPOWERING TEACHERS TO INTEGRATE FORMAL, INFORMAL, AND AFTER-SCHOOL EDUCATION TO ENHANCE TEACHING AND LEARNING IN GRADES K-8 JENNIFER PECK (Co-Chair), Partnership for Children and Youth, Oakland, CA MIKE TOWN (Co-Chair), Redmond STEM School, Redmond, WA MARGARET GASTON, Gaston Education Policy Associates, Washington, DC LAURA HENRIQUES, California State University, Long Beach ANITA KRISHNAMURTHI, Afterschool Alliance, Washington, DC CLAUDIA WALKER, Murphey Traditional Academy, Greensboro, NC JAY B. LABOV, Senior Advisor for Education and Communication, Director, National Academies Teacher Advisory Council, and Project Study Director ELIZABETH CARVELLAS, Teacher Leader, Teacher Advisory Council v

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Teacher Advisory Council STEVEN L. LONG (Chair), Rogers High School, Rogers, AR JULIANA JONES (Vice-Chair), Longfellow Middle School, Berkeley, CA NANCY ARROYO, Riverside High School, El Paso, TX CHARLENE DINDO, Pelican’s Nest Science Lab, Fairhope, AL KENNETH HUFF, Mill Middle School, Williamsville, NY MARY MARGUERITE (MARGO) MURPHY, Camden Hills Regional High School, Rockport, ME JENNIFER SINSEL, Bostic Elementary School, Wichita, KS SHEIKISHA THOMAS, Jordan High School, Durham, NC BRUCE ALBERTS (Ex Officio), University of California, San Francisco, CA JAY LABOV, Senior Advisor for Education and Communication and Staff Director MARY ANN KASPER, Senior Program Assistant ELIZABETH CARVELLAS, Teacher Leader vi

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Acknowledgments This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Barnett Berry, Center for Teaching Quality, Carrboro, NC; Kathy Bihr, Tiger Woods Learning Center, Irvine, CA; and Caleb Cheung, Science Manager, Oakland Unified School District, CA. Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they did not see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Eugenie C. Scott, previous executive director, National Center for Science Education. Appointed by the National Research Council’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, she was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authors and the institution. We sincerely thank the following foundations in the STEM Funders Network for their generous support of this convocation: Burroughs Wellcome Fund; S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation; Noyce Foundation; Samueli Foundation; and the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation. We especially thank Gerald Solomon, executive director of the Samueli Foundation, for his support and encouragement throughout the planning and implementation of the convocation and to the Samueli Foundation for providing direct logistical and travel support for all participants. Michelle Freeman and Katrina Gaudier from the Samueli Foundation were most helpful in working with the committee, NRC staff, presenters, and participants in all phases of this effort. Jan Morrison, Michelle Kalista, and Meghan Sadler from Teaching Institute for Excellence in STEM also provided logistical support on behalf of the STEM Funders Network. We also thank Monica Champaneria, Danielle Crosser, and Edward Patte, NAS staff members at the Beckman Center, for assisting participants during the convocation. vii

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Contents Contents Planning Committee on STEM Learning is Everywhere ............................................................... v PLANNING COMMITTEE ON STEM LEARNING IS EVERYWHERE .................................. v Acknowledgments......................................................................................................................... vii 1....................................................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction to the Convocation ..................................................................................................... 1 Themes of the Convocation ........................................................................................................ 4 Organization of the Report.......................................................................................................... 5 2....................................................................................................................................................... 7 Envisioning the Possible ................................................................................................................. 7 The Business Case ...................................................................................................................... 8 A Wealth of Resources ............................................................................................................... 9 Lessons for Effective Partnerships............................................................................................ 10 3..................................................................................................................................................... 11 Achieving the Vision .................................................................................................................... 11 A Survey of Cross-Sector Collaborations ................................................................................. 11 Concept of a Learning Ecosystem ........................................................................................ 12 Strategies for Building Ecosystems ...................................................................................... 13 Toward Integrated STEM Education ........................................................................................ 15 A Framework for STEM Integration .................................................................................... 15 The Potential for Afterschool Programs ................................................................................... 17 The Need for New Policies ................................................................................................... 18 Discussion ................................................................................................................................. 19 A Perspective from Schools ...................................................................................................... 19 The Power of Partnerships .................................................................................................... 20 Discussion ................................................................................................................................. 20 4..................................................................................................................................................... 22 Implications for Research and Policy ........................................................................................... 22 Implications for Research ......................................................................................................... 22 Implications for Policy .............................................................................................................. 24 ix

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Prepublication copy, uncorrected proofs Discussion ................................................................................................................................. 25 5..................................................................................................................................................... 27 Breakout Sessions by Topic .......................................................................................................... 27 Alignment of Learning Opportunities ....................................................................................... 27 Pre-Service and Educator Professional Learning ..................................................................... 28 Assessment of Student Goals .................................................................................................... 29 Online Collaboration ................................................................................................................. 29 Joint Funding and Policy Solutions .......................................................................................... 30 6..................................................................................................................................................... 33 Breakout Sessions by Sector ......................................................................................................... 33 The Informal Sector .................................................................................................................. 33 The Afterschool Sector ............................................................................................................. 34 The Formal Sector..................................................................................................................... 34 7..................................................................................................................................................... 36 Comments from Convocation Participants ................................................................................... 36 An Ecosystems Approach ......................................................................................................... 36 The Roles of Educators ............................................................................................................. 37 Rural Schools ............................................................................................................................ 38 Resources .................................................................................................................................. 39 Allies ......................................................................................................................................... 40 References ..................................................................................................................................... 41 APPENDIX A ............................................................................................................................... 44 CONVOCATION AGENDA ....................................................................................................... 44 APPENDIX B ............................................................................................................................... 48 BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND PRESENTERS ......................... 48 APPENDIX C: .............................................................................................................................. 51 CONVOCATION ATTENDEES ................................................................................................. 51 x