Study Committee Biographical Information

Amy R. Pritchett, Chair, is the David S. Lewis Associate Professor of Cognitive Engineering in the School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. She holds a joint appointment in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. Dr. Pritchett received bachelor’s, master’s, and ScD degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She has led numerous research projects sponsored by industry, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). She has served as Director of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program. Dr. Pritchett was responsible for planning and execution of the program ($75 million to $82 million per year), which was conducted at four NASA research centers and sponsored about 200 research agreements. In that role, she served on the Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee of the Office of Science and Technology Policy and on the executive committees of the Commercial Aviation Safety Team and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing program. She has published more than 170 papers in conference proceedings and in scholarly journals such as Human Factors, Journal of Aircraft, and Air Traffic Control Quarterly. She has won the William H. Jackson Award of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) and, as part of Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the Collier Trophy, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Aviation has named a scholarship for her. Dr. Pritchett is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making. She is a member of FAA’s Research, Engineering, and Development Advisory Committee (REDAC) and chairs REDAC’s Human Factors Subcommittee. She is a licensed pilot.

Mathias Basner is an Assistant Professor of Sleep and Chronobiology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Basner received a degree in medicine and a PhD in research from the University of Bochum, Germany, and a master of science degree in epidemiology from the University of Bielefeld, Germany. He trained at the Institute for Applied Physiology at the University of Bochum and worked as a Research Associate at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Flight Physiology Division from 1999 until 2006 before moving to the United States to pursue his research interests in the neurobehavioral consequences of sleep loss as a research associate. He returned to DLR in 2008 to head the Flight Physiology Division for 2 years. At that time, he was coinvestigator on a Deutsche Flugsicherung (German Air Traffic Control) study investigating workload effects in Croatian air traffic controllers. In January 2010, Dr. Basner assumed the position of Assistant Professor of Sleep and Chronobiology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. He was awarded the German Aerospace Center Science Award in 2007 and the Science Award of the German Academy for Aviation and Travel Medicine in 2010. He is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and its sleep deprivation steering committee. He is also a member of the Sleep Research Society and the German Sleep Research Society. Dr. Basner is Deputy Editor of the journal Sleep, on the editorial boards of Noise and Health and PLOS ONE, and ad hoc reviewer for 40 scientific journals. He has reviewed proposals for the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the European Space Agency, the Australian Antarctic Science Program, and the German Research Foundation.



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Study Committee Biographical Information Amy R. Pritchett, Chair, is the David S. Lewis Associate Professor of Cognitive Engineering in the School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. She holds a joint appointment in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. Dr. Pritchett received bachelor’s, master’s, and ScD degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She has led numerous research projects sponsored by industry, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). She has served as Director of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program. Dr. Pritchett was responsible for planning and execution of the program ($75 million to $82 million per year), which was conducted at four NASA research centers and sponsored about 200 research agreements. In that role, she served on the Aeronautics Science and Technology Subcommittee of the Office of Science and Technology Policy and on the executive committees of the Commercial Aviation Safety Team and the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing program. She has published more than 170 papers in conference proceedings and in scholarly journals such as Human Factors, Journal of Aircraft, and Air Traffic Control Quarterly. She has won the William H. Jackson Award of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) and, as part of Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the Collier Trophy, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Aviation has named a scholarship for her. Dr. Pritchett is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making. She is a member of FAA’s Research, Engineering, and Development Advisory Committee (REDAC) and chairs REDAC’s Human Factors Subcommittee. She is a licensed pilot. Mathias Basner is an Assistant Professor of Sleep and Chronobiology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Basner received a degree in medicine and a PhD in research from the University of Bochum, Germany, and a master of science degree in epidemiology from the University of Bielefeld, Germany. He trained at the Institute for Applied Physiology at the University of Bochum and worked as a Research Associate at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Flight Physiology Division from 1999 until 2006 before moving to the United States to pursue his research interests in the neurobehavioral consequences of sleep loss as a research associate. He returned to DLR in 2008 to head the Flight Physiology Division for 2 years. At that time, he was coinvestigator on a Deutsche Flugsicherung (German Air Traffic Control) study investigating workload effects in Croatian air traffic controllers. In January 2010, Dr. Basner assumed the position of Assistant Professor of Sleep and Chronobiology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. He was awarded the German Aerospace Center Science Award in 2007 and the Science Award of the German Academy for Aviation and Travel Medicine in 2010. He is a member of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and its sleep deprivation steering committee. He is also a member of the Sleep Research Society and the German Sleep Research Society. Dr. Basner is Deputy Editor of the journal Sleep, on the editorial boards of Noise and Health and PLOS ONE, and ad hoc reviewer for 40 scientific journals. He has reviewed proposals for the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the European Space Agency, the Australian Antarctic Science Program, and the German Research Foundation. 114

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Study Committee Biographical Information 115 Peter J. Basso retired as Chief Operating Officer and Business Development Director of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) in February 2013. Before joining AASHTO in 2001, he served as Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs and as Chief Financial Officer of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Mr. Basso’s 34 years of service as a career official included assignments as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs of the Department of Transportation, Assistant Director for General Management of the Office of Management and Budget, Deputy Chair for Management of the National Endowment for the Arts, and Director of Fiscal Services for the Federal Highway Administration. He received a BS in business administration from the University of Maryland. Lawrence M. Cole is an aviation professional with 38 years of experience in the field of air traffic control (ATC). He began his career in 1968 as a U.S. Air Force radar air traffic approach controller. This was followed by 18 years in positions of increasing responsibility at operational FAA terminal radar approach control facilities and towers and as an instructor at the FAA Air Traffic Control Academy. During his last 17 years with FAA he served at the agency’s national headquarters, where his responsibilities included managing the ATC Human Factors (HF) Research Program, the Technical Operations HF Research Program, and the Runway Safety HF Program in support of long-term agency plans and objectives. For the past 6 years, Mr. Cole has been self-employed as an aviation and HF consultant affiliated with Aloft Aviation Consulting, LLC. He has a master of business administration degree from Western New England College and a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from West Virginia Wesleyan College. Mary (Missy) L. Cummings received her BS in mathematics from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1988, her MS in space systems engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1994, and her PhD in systems engineering from the University of Virginia in 2004. A naval officer and military pilot from 1988 to 1999, she was one of the Navy’s first female fighter pilots. She is an associate professor in the Duke University Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and the Duke Institute of Brain Sciences, and she is the director of the Humans and Autonomy Laboratory. Her research interests include human–unmanned vehicle interaction, human– autonomous system collaboration, human–systems engineering, public policy implications of unmanned vehicles, and the ethical and social impact of technology. Francis T. Durso is Professor of Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology. His areas of recent and current research include (a) an exploration of how the HF consequences of the Next Generation Air Transportation System and related automation of some tasks could affect air traffic controller strategies for managing workload, situation understanding, and performance and (b) development of a taxonomy of human–automation coordination strategies and the consequences of those strategies for the development of new technologies. Dr. Durso is the current President of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Human–Systems Integration. He has coauthored several articles dealing with aviation safety; air traffic controller selection criteria; air traffic control; task analysis; and management of workload, performance, and situational awareness in aviation. He received a PhD in psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

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116 Federal Aviation Administration’s Approach for Determining Future Air Traffic Controller Staffing Needs John J. Fearnsides is CEO and Chief Strategist, MJF Strategies, LLC. Until 1999, he was Senior Vice President and General Manager of the MITRE Corporation and Director of its Center for Advanced Aviation System Development. He worked at the U.S. Department of Transportation from 1972 to 1980, serving as Deputy Under Secretary and Chief Scientist, Executive Assistant to the Secretary, and Acting Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs. He was a National Science Foundation Fellow and is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the National Academy of Public Administration. He has served on numerous NRC and Transportation Research Board committees, including the Committee for a Review of the En Route Air Traffic Control Complexity and Workload Model and the Committee for a Study on Air Passenger Service and Safety Since Deregulation. Dr. Fearnsides received his BSEE and MSEE from Drexel University and holds a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland. Andrew LeBovidge has been an ATC Specialist with FAA at the Houston Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) from 1992 to the present. He has also served as a representative for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) since 1998, area representative from 1998 to 2000, Principal Facility Representative at the Houston ARTCC (Local President) from 2000 until the present, and Alternate Regional Vice President for NATCA’s Southwest Region from 2003 until the present. He has worked on several national and regional committees focusing on staffing and placement within the ATC system. He is recognized by both management and labor for his expertise. Mr. LeBovidge received a bachelor of arts degree in history from the University of Pennsylvania. Amedeo R. Odoni is a Professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT. He has served as codirector of the Global Airline Industry Center at MIT (1999–2009) and of FAA’s National Center of Excellence in Aviation Operations Research (1996–2002). Previously, he was head of the Systems Division of the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department (1991–1996) and codirector of MIT’s Operations Research Center (1985–1991). Dr. Odoni is the author or coauthor of three textbooks and about 100 professional publications, as well as coeditor of six books. He served as Editor-in- Chief of Transportation Science from 1985 to 1991 and is a current or past member of the editorial boards of many professional journals. Dr. Odoni is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science, and the recipient of many awards for his teaching and research. He has served as consultant to national and international organizations and to many of the busiest airports in the world on projects related to practically every aspect of airport planning and design and of air traffic management. Norman T. O’Meara is a Senior Fellow at the Logistics Management Institute, where over the past 20 years he has analyzed manpower, workforce planning, and resource allocation issues for a number of top-level governmental entities with emphases on the cabinet-level Departments of State, Defense, and Transportation. Dr. O’Meara served on a congressionally directed NRC committee to study FAA’s methods for estimating air traffic controller staffing requirements. He led the analytical team for the Department of Defense’s Joint Cross Service Group for Depot Maintenance in support of the department’s base realignment and closure recommendations and testimony before the commission. Dr. O’Meara served with the Army Science Board to identify

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Study Committee Biographical Information 117 the resource alternatives necessary for Army transformation. He received a bachelor of science degree from the United States Military Academy, master of science degrees in mathematics and operations research and statistics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a doctor of science degree from George Washington University. Clinton V. Oster, Jr., is Professor Emeritus and former Associate Dean for Bloomington Programs at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University. His research has centered on aviation safety, airline economics and competition policy, energy policy, and environmental and natural resource policy. He has coauthored five books on various aspects of air transportation including Deregulation and the Future of Intercity Passenger Travel with John Meyer and Managing the Skies: Public Policy, Organization, and Financing of Air Navigation with John Strong. He is a coauthor of the Transportation chapter in Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment. He has chaired and served on numerous NRC committees. He was chair of the Committee for the Study of Traffic Safety Lessons from Benchmark Nations, chair of the Committee on the Federal Employers’ Liability Act, chair of the Committee on the Effects of Commuting on Pilot Fatigue, and cochair of the Committee on NASA’s National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service Project. He was a member of the Committee for Guidance on Setting and Enforcing Speed Limits and the Committee for a Study on Air Passenger Service and Safety Since Deregulation. He holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Princeton University, a master’s degree in public affairs from Carnegie–Mellon University, and a PhD in economics from Harvard University. Roger Wall has more than 50 years of air traffic management (ATM) and control experience and has been self-employed as an independent consultant with the Washington Consulting Group since 2011. He has focused primarily on international efforts in China with the U.S.–China Aviation Cooperation Program, including teaching classes to Chinese transportation and civil aviation personnel on U.S. ATC policies and procedures. Mr. Wall retired from his position as FAA Coordinator and ATM Projects Manager for FedEx Corporation in 2008, having served 10 years with FedEx. Before joining FedEx, he was Director of Air Traffic Operations for FAA, having risen from air traffic controller. At FAA, Mr. Wall held management positions at ATC facilities, FAA regional offices, and FAA headquarters. He began his career as an air traffic controller for the U.S. Navy in 1959. From 1996 to 2008, he served as chairman of the Free Flight Select Committee of RTCA and the Air Traffic Management and Airport Systems Requirements and Planning Working Group. He was honored with RTCA’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008. He holds a private pilot, single-engine land rating. He served on the Committee for a Review of the En Route Air Traffic Control Complexity and Workload Model. He is a graduate of the Government Senior Executive Service Program.

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