Appendix

To gather information for its report, the panel contacted a large number of individuals in both academe and industry. Each was asked to respond to the following questions:

  • What areas of fundamental research are most helpful to support commercial catalyst/catalysis activity in U.S. industry?

  • Should the dispersal of federal research grants to academic researchers be based on demonstrated excellence in science or focused to support the national laboratories?

  • What type of linkage with academia/national laboratories is most useful to, and supportable by, U.S. industry?

  • What elements in science or technology provided the edge to your commercial business in catalyst/catalytic processes?

  • What novel catalytic processes do you expect to be developed in the next 10 to 15 years?

  • What will be the nature of the exploratory and basic research that leads to these developments?

  • Is academic and industrial catalytic research in the United States well positioned to play a leadership role in creating this new technology and, if not, what needs to be done?

  • Identify areas of catalyst science and technology in which the United State is (1) behind competitors, (2) even with competitors, and (3) ahead of competitors.

  • Identify problems that have long-term payoff.



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Catalysis Looks to the Future Appendix To gather information for its report, the panel contacted a large number of individuals in both academe and industry. Each was asked to respond to the following questions: What areas of fundamental research are most helpful to support commercial catalyst/catalysis activity in U.S. industry? Should the dispersal of federal research grants to academic researchers be based on demonstrated excellence in science or focused to support the national laboratories? What type of linkage with academia/national laboratories is most useful to, and supportable by, U.S. industry? What elements in science or technology provided the edge to your commercial business in catalyst/catalytic processes? What novel catalytic processes do you expect to be developed in the next 10 to 15 years? What will be the nature of the exploratory and basic research that leads to these developments? Is academic and industrial catalytic research in the United States well positioned to play a leadership role in creating this new technology and, if not, what needs to be done? Identify areas of catalyst science and technology in which the United State is (1) behind competitors, (2) even with competitors, and (3) ahead of competitors. Identify problems that have long-term payoff.

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Catalysis Looks to the Future What areas are ''mature'' or "dead"? Has too much emphasis been placed on one area in the past? What would be the ideal mix of industrial and academic research in catalysis? What are the major unsolved problems in catalysis, and what would the solution to these problems provide in economic and technical terms? Are there new areas where catalysis could be used? A total of 30 responses to these questions was received. Those providing input are acknowledged below as corresponding contributers. CORRESPONDING CONTRIBUTORS Charles R. Adams Shell Development Company David Allen Department of Chemical Engineering University of California, Los Angeles Paul A. Bartlett Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Jay B. Benziger Department of Chemical Engineering Princeton University Robert G. Bergman Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Cynthia J. Burrows Department of Chemistry State University of New York, Stony Brook James P. Collman Department of Chemistry Stanford University Mark E. Davis Department of Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology W. Nicholas Delgass Department of Chemical Engineering Purdue University Francois N. Diederich Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, Los Angeles Robert P. Eischens Zettlemoyer Center for Surface Science Lehigh University John G. Ekerdt Department of Chemical Engineering University of Texas, Austin David A. Evans Department of Chemistry Harvard University

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Catalysis Looks to the Future Rocco A. Fiato Exxon Research and Engineering Company Juan M. Garces Dow Chemical Company Mary L. Good Signal Research Vladimir Haensel Chemical Engineering Department University of Massachusetts, Amherst Gary L. Haller Chemical Engineering Department Yale University Heinz Heinemann Center for Advanced Materials Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Enrique Iglesia Exxon Research and Engineering Company William P. Jencks Graduate Department of Biochemistry Brandeis University Andrew S. Kaldor Exxon Research and Engineering Company Jeremy R. Knowles Department of Chemistry Harvard University Ralph Landau Listowel, Inc. Jerry A. Meyer Chevron Research and Technology Company Craig B. Murchison Dow Chemical Company Mario L. Occelli Unocal Corporation Nicholas D. Spencer W. R. Grace & Company George M. Whitesides Department of Chemistry Harvard University Craig Wilcox Department of Chemistry University of Pittsburgh

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Catalysis Looks to the Future As an additional means of gathering information, the panel held a workshop on April 20-21, 1990, to which it invited a series of speakers to give a perspective on the current status of catalysis research and prospective areas for future work. Representatives from each of the federal agencies supporting catalysis research were invited to present a summary of their programs. PROGRAM FOR THE WORKSHOP ON NEW DIRECTIONS IN CATALYST SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Friday, April 20, 1990 8:30-8:45 a.m. Alexis Bell—University of California, Berkeley Introduction and Overview 8:45-9:25 a.m. James Cusumano—Catalytica, Inc. Catalytic Technologies 9:25-9:45 a.m. Discussion 9:45-10:25 a.m. N. Y. Chen—Mobil Research and Development Company Zeolite Catalysis 10:25-10:45 a.m. Discussion 10:45-11:00 a.m. Break 11:00-11:40 a.m. James Lyons—Sun Oil Company Alkane Activation by Partial Oxidation 11:40-12:00 a.m. Discussion 12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00-1:40 p.m. Mordecai Shelef—Ford Motor Company Catalysis for Environmental Protection 1:40-2:00 p.m. Discussion 2:00-2:40 p.m. George Parshall—E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company Industrial Synthesis of Chemicals via Homogeneous Catalysis 2:40-3:00 p.m. Discussion 3:00-3:15 p.m. Break 3:15-3:55 p.m. Jack Halpern—University of Chicago New Directions in Homogeneous Catalysis 3:55-4:15 p.m. Discussion 4:15-4:55 p.m. Fred Karol—Union Carbide Corporation Polymerization Catalysis 4:55-5:15 p.m. Discussion

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Catalysis Looks to the Future Saturday, April 21, 1990 8:30-9:10 a.m. John Tully—AT&T Bell Laboratories Theory Applied to Gas-Surface Interactions 9:10-9:30 a.m. Discussion 9:30-10:10 a.m. Jack Kirsch—University of California, Berkeley New Challenges in Biocatalysis 10:10-10:30 a.m. Discussion 10:30-10:45 a.m. Break 10:45-11:25 a.m. Dennis Forster—Monsanto Company The Interface of Catalysis with Biology 11:25-11:45 a.m. Discussion 12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00-1:15 p.m. Robert Mariannelli—U.S. Department of Energy 1:15-1:30 p.m. Kendall Houck—National Science Foundation 1:30-1:45 p.m. Warren Jones—National Institutes of Health 1:45-2:00 p.m. Harold Guard—Office of Naval Research 2:00-2:20 p.m. Discussion 2:20-3:30 p.m. General Discussion

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