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Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members

STEPHEN J. BURGES joined the faculty of The University of Washington in 1970 where he is a professor of civil engineering. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and has major interests in science and practice of hydrology and water resources engineering. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has been active in many WSTB activities. He is a former Co-Editor for Physical Sciences of Water Resources Research, published by the American Geophysical Union. His research interests include a broad range of topics in hydrology and hydrologic engineering, including streamflow production, and understanding and modeling hydrologic processes.

ROBERT E. DICKINSON holds a Ph.D. in meteorology (1966) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After an early career at MIT, he moved to the National Center for Atmospheric Research in 1968 and remained there until his recent move to the University of Arizona's Institute for Atmospheric Physics. Dr. Dickinson's research interests include land surface processes and climate change. He is known for his work in global climate modeling. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the NRC's Committee on Global Change.



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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members STEPHEN J. BURGES joined the faculty of The University of Washington in 1970 where he is a professor of civil engineering. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and has major interests in science and practice of hydrology and water resources engineering. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and has been active in many WSTB activities. He is a former Co-Editor for Physical Sciences of Water Resources Research, published by the American Geophysical Union. His research interests include a broad range of topics in hydrology and hydrologic engineering, including streamflow production, and understanding and modeling hydrologic processes. ROBERT E. DICKINSON holds a Ph.D. in meteorology (1966) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After an early career at MIT, he moved to the National Center for Atmospheric Research in 1968 and remained there until his recent move to the University of Arizona's Institute for Atmospheric Physics. Dr. Dickinson's research interests include land surface processes and climate change. He is known for his work in global climate modeling. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the NRC's Committee on Global Change.

OCR for page 337
Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona KENNETH D. FREDERICK is a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF) in Washington, D.C. He has been a member of the research staff at RFF since 1971 and has served as director of the Renewable Resources Division from 1977 to 1988. Dr. Frederick received his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965 and his B.A. from Amherst College in 1961. He served as an economic advisor in Brazil for the U.S. Agency for International Development from 1965 to 1967 and an assistant professor of economics at the California Institute of Technology from 1967 to 1971. He is the author, coauthor or editor of six books and has authored more than 30 papers addressing the economic, environmental, and institutional aspects of water resource use and management. ROGER E. KASPERSON received his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago. He has been on the faculty at Clark University for most of his diverse career. His research has covered all aspects of water resources policy with emphasis on applications of risk assessment. He is currently conducting research on the contributions of risk analysis toward the understanding of global environmental change. BRUCE A. KIMBALL received his Ph.D. in soils from Cornell University in 1970. He is presently a soil scientists at the USDA/Agricultural Research Service's Water Conservation Laboratory in Phoenix, Arizona. For most of his career, Dr. Kimball has been interested in ways to ameliorate the effects of plant stress on crop production. This has led to development of greenhouse computer models. He has also been investigating the effects of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and changing climate on crop yield and water use. DANIEL SHEER is president of Water Resources Management, Inc. (WRMI), a water resources consulting firm in Columbia, Maryland. Since founding WRMI in 1985, Dr. Sheer has worked for a variety of U.S. and international government agencies building simulation and optimization models to describe water resource systems for analysis, gaming, and computer-aided negotiating sessions. In 1980, Dr. Sheer became the first director of the ICPRB Section on Cooperative Water Supply Operations on the Potomac (CO-OP). Dr. Sheer has served as a member of the NRC's Water Science and Technology Board and participated in several intergovernmental assignments. He received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University.