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Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Principal Contributors

LEON HARTWELL ALLEN, JR. is a soil scientist with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he also serves as Adjunct Professor in the Agronomy Department. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University and has studied the effects of microclimate on plants for many years, including transport mechanisms for carbon dioxide and water vapor. Dr. Allen's current research is assessing the response of vegetation to rising levels of carbon dioxide and global climate change. He also has evaluated various carbon dioxide enrichment systems. Dr. Allen is a Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy.

EDITH BROWN WEISS is on leave from her position as professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center (where she has taught international law, international environmental law, water law, and environmental law) and is serving as Associate General Counsel for International Activities at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Brown Weiss has served as chair of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on Research in Global Environmental Change and is former vice president of the American Society of International Law. Dr. Brown Weiss was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1985-1988 and has served on



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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Principal Contributors LEON HARTWELL ALLEN, JR. is a soil scientist with the USDA's Agricultural Research Service at the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he also serves as Adjunct Professor in the Agronomy Department. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University and has studied the effects of microclimate on plants for many years, including transport mechanisms for carbon dioxide and water vapor. Dr. Allen's current research is assessing the response of vegetation to rising levels of carbon dioxide and global climate change. He also has evaluated various carbon dioxide enrichment systems. Dr. Allen is a Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy. EDITH BROWN WEISS is on leave from her position as professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center (where she has taught international law, international environmental law, water law, and environmental law) and is serving as Associate General Counsel for International Activities at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Brown Weiss has served as chair of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on Research in Global Environmental Change and is former vice president of the American Society of International Law. Dr. Brown Weiss was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1985-1988 and has served on

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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona several NRC committees. She is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law, International Legal Materials, and Climate Change Digest, and was elected to membership in the Council on Foreign Relations, American Law Institute, and the International Council on Environmental Law. Her book, In Fairness to Future Generations , received the Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law in 1990. She received her A.B. from Stanford University, LL.B. from Harvard Law School, and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. DALE BUCKS is the National Program Leader for Water Quality and Water Management for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland. He is co-chair of the Research and Development Committee of the USDA Working Group on Water Quality. He began his career as a research agricultural engineer at the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory in Phoenix, Arizona, where he published on the topics of irrigation practices, crop water requirements, and alternative agricultural management systems. Dr. Bucks holds a Ph.D. in soil and water science from the University of Arizona. JIM CARRIER is a columnist who covers the West for The Denver Post . A journalist for 25 years, 15 of them in the West, Mr. Carrier has written five books on western issues, ranging from Yellowstone National Park to cowboys and Indians. His interest in water issues stems from an extensive series on the Colorado River, republished as ''Down the Colorado." His report was updated in a June 1991 article in National Geographic Magazine titled, "The Colorado River in an Era of Limits." ARNETT S. DENNIS has worked for the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation in Denver, Colorado, since 1981 on weather modification and climate change projects. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from McGill University in Montreal, Canada in 1955. He was vice president of the Weather Modification Company of San Jose, California, senior physicist at Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, California, and a consultant for the World Meteorological Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and past president of the Weather Modification Association. JOHN DRACUP is a professor in the Civil Engineering Department of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the

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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona University of California at Los Angeles. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in civil engineering. His professional interests and expertise are in the fields of hydrology and water resource systems engineering. He has undertaken stochastic analysis of floods and droughts, investigation of the effects of climate stress on hydrologic processes, and development of computer models for the management of large-scale river basin systems. JIM DYER is director of the Water, Agriculture, and Internship Programs at the Rocky Mountain Institute in Snowmass, Colorado. He earned a B.S. in meteorology from Saint Louis University and an M.A. in Natural Science from San Jose State University, with postgraduate study in renewable resources, meteorology, and geography. Mr. Dyer has a wide background in earth and soil science and in the environmental and physical sciences. He is a member of the American Meteorological Society. MALCOLM K. HUGHES is director of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research and professor of dendrochronology at the University of Arizona. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Durham, England, and worked in Denmark and England before moving to Arizona in 1986. Dr. Hughes has been a member of the Council of the British Ecological Society, and he was Secretary of the British Ecological Society's Energy and Production Biology Group for several years. He is a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union for Quaternary Research and of the organizing committee for the 1989 Global Change Institute. He is a member of the advisory panel on paleoclimate formed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, and he chairs the University of Arizona's Coordinating Committee on Global Change. HELEN INGRAM is director of the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy in Tucson, Arizona. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University, taught at the University of New Mexico, worked on the staff of the National Water Commission, and was a research fellow at Resources for the Future. She has been on the staff of the University of Arizona since 1972. Dr. Ingram has done extensive research on the public policy aspects of water resources. She is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board, and was recently appointed to the NRC's new Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources.

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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona JOHN KEANE is a water policy analyst for the Salt River Project (SRP) in Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. Keane has held several technical and management positions with the SRP in the areas of supply forecasting, reservoir operations, water rights adjudications, state water regulations and legislative water issues. He holds an M.S. from the University of Arizona, focusing on watershed hydrology and resource policy. DONALD R. KENDALL received his Ph.D. in Water Resources Hydrology from the University of California at Los Angeles. He is currently an assistant professor at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. His professional interests include hydrology and water resource development. Dr. Kendall also serves as a consultant to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. WAYNE MARCHANT is chief of the Research and Laboratory Services Division, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado. He manages a diverse water resources research program that includes: water quality, water supply, hydroelectric power, and environmental components. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and holds three U.S. patents based on his personal research. He has published on topics ranging from the irreversible chemical labeling of enzymes to industrial stack gas desulfurization. In 1987, he received the Department of the Interior's Meritorious Service Award and in 1988 the Secretary's Award for Exceptional Service. DAVID MEKO is an associate scientist with the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona. He holds degrees in meteorology and atmospheric sciences from Penn State University, and received his Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona. He served as a research hydrologist with the Tohono O'odham Nation in southwestern Arizona from 1986 to 1989. His interests include application of tree-ring data to infer the natural variability of runoff on time scales of decades to centuries. MARSHALL MOSS is an hydrologist with the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). He has spent more than 25 years with USGS in varying capacities, collecting and interpreting hydrologic data, performing research, and serving as a senior executive. He holds a Ph.D. from Colorado State and is an active officer in the American Geophysical Union.

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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona LINDA NASH is a research associate of the Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security in Berkeley, California. Her current research is in the areas of water resources and water quality management. She is a member of the ASCE Committee on Climate Change and Water Resources. She previously worked as a policy analyst for the California Water Quality Control Board and as a technical analyst for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the Superfund Program. ROGER REVELLE received his Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California in 1936. The late Dr. Revelle, renowned for his many accomplishments and innovative thinking, was the recipient of numerous awards throughout his career, including the National Medal of Science from President Bush in 1990, the Tyler Award for Environmental Achievement, the Balzan Prize for Science, and the Agassiz Medal. Dr. Revelle was one of the founders of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO. Dr. Revelle was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he served as a member of its Governing Board. JOHN SCHAAKE, JR. is senior scientist, Office of Hydrology, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. He holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering and Water Resources from The Johns Hopkins University, and did postdoctoral work with the Harvard Water Program. Dr. Schaake is author of a chapter in Climate Change and U.S. Water Resources dealing with the sensitivity of water resources to climate change. He is chair of the Science Panel for the GEWEX (Global Water and Energy Cycle Experiment) Continental-Scale International Project of the World Climate Research Program. His interests include the development of orographic precipitation models to analyze spatial distribution of precipitation in the western United States for input to hydrologic models and to assess information content of precipitation and snow measurement networks. CHARLES W. STOCKTON is a professor of dendrochronology and has been on the staff of the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona since 1970. He received his Ph.D. in hydrology from the University of Arizona in 1971. His research has been in hydrologic and climatological applications of tree-ring data, especially in the reconstruction of streamflow and the occurrence of drought.

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Managing Water Resources in the West Under Conditions of Climate Uncertainty: Proceedings of a Colloquium November 14–16, 1990 Scottsdale, Arizona A. DAN TARLOCK teaches at Chicago Kent College of Law. He has written extensively about water resources management and environmental law and policy. Mr. Tarlock has served on a variety of NRC activities; he is chair of the WSTB's Committee on Western Water Management and is vice chair of the Water Science and Technology Board. He received his law degree from Stanford University. KEVIN TRENBERTH is head of the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. After completing a degree in mathematics at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, he obtained his Sc.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in meteorology in 1972. Following several years in the New Zealand Meteorological Service, he joined the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Illinois in 1977; he moved to NCAR in 1984. He has served on the National Research Council's Polar Research Board, several committees under the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and the Space Science Board. He is a member of the NOAA Climate and Global Change advisory panel and has served as an editor of scientific journals. He is known for his work on global atmospheric circulation and climate change. GILBERT WHITE is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Geography in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he was on the faculty from 1956-1970. He has worked on water problems with the National Resources Planning Board and Bureau of the Budget from 1934-1942. His service includes: vice-chair of the President's Water Resources Policy Commission, 1950; chair of the Task Force on Federal Flood Policy, 1965-1966; and chair of the NRC's Commission on Natural Resources, 1977-1980. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and foreign member of the Soviet Academy of Sciences. He has served as chair for the NRC's Environmental Studies Board and as a member of the Technology Assessment Advisory Council of the United States Congress.