Appendix
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

RICHARD C. ATKINSON (Chair) is chancellor of the University of California at San Diego and professor of cognitive science and psychology. He formerly served as director of the National Science Foundation and president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His research on problems of memory and cognition has been used to develop computer-controlled systems for instruction in the primary grades. Atkinson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society. He obtained a Ph.B. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from Indiana University.

LAWRENCE BADAR is assistant dean of the Department of Mathematics and Natural Science at Case Western University. His responsibilities include supervising in-service training programs for elementary and secondary teachers, directing the high school science olympics, and coordinating the university's programs for gifted and talented precollege students. He received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematic Teaching in 1985 for his work as a high school physics teacher, and he subsequently served 2 years at the National Science Foundation supervising that award program and another grants program designed for the enhancement of teaching.

G. CARL BALL is chairman of the board of George J. Ball, Inc., one of the largest agriculture and horticulture producers in the country. For two de-



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Research and Education Reform: Roles for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff RICHARD C. ATKINSON (Chair) is chancellor of the University of California at San Diego and professor of cognitive science and psychology. He formerly served as director of the National Science Foundation and president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His research on problems of memory and cognition has been used to develop computer-controlled systems for instruction in the primary grades. Atkinson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society. He obtained a Ph.B. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from Indiana University. LAWRENCE BADAR is assistant dean of the Department of Mathematics and Natural Science at Case Western University. His responsibilities include supervising in-service training programs for elementary and secondary teachers, directing the high school science olympics, and coordinating the university's programs for gifted and talented precollege students. He received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematic Teaching in 1985 for his work as a high school physics teacher, and he subsequently served 2 years at the National Science Foundation supervising that award program and another grants program designed for the enhancement of teaching. G. CARL BALL is chairman of the board of George J. Ball, Inc., one of the largest agriculture and horticulture producers in the country. For two de-

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Research and Education Reform: Roles for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement cades he served as president of Ball, Inc. Ball is president of the Ball Foundation, which does research on human ability and education issues. He also provides major support to a consortium organized by Teachers College at Columbia University that is exploring productivity in U.S. education. Ball serves on the boards of the Corridor Partnership for Excellence in Education, the Illinois Math and Science Academy (IMSA), the IMSA Alliance, and the Illinois Institute of Technology, West. JAMES A. BANKS is professor of education and director of the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington, Seattle. A former classroom teacher, Banks is a frequent lecturer and consultant to school districts and universities. In 1986 he was named Distinguished Scholar/ Researcher on Minority Education by the American Educational Research Association. He has received fellowships from the National Academy of Education, the Kellogg Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation. Banks has written or edited 14 books on multicultural education and social studies including Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies (5th Ed.), Multiethnic Education: Theory and Practice (2nd Ed.) and Teaching Strategies for the Social Studies, (4th Ed.). He has also written more than 100 articles and contributions to books. KATHERINE L. BICK is the U.S. scientific liaison for Centro SMID Firenze, the Italian research group studying Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in association with the World Health Organization and other organizations. A neurobiologist, she was previously Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). During her career at NIH, she developed new programs in brain research and framed policies that guided federal sponsorship of biomedical research. Prior to her government service, she was a faculty member at the University of California at Los Angeles; California State University, Northridge; and Georgetown University. In addition to research reports, she edited Alzheimer's Disease: Senile Dementia and Related Disorders and published translations of early European works in The Early Story of Alzheimer's Disease. She received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Acadia University, Nova Scotia, Canada, and a Ph.D. degree from Brown University. C. L. HUTCHINS is the executive director of the Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory (McREL) and the McREL Institute. He was formerly an assistant director at the National Institute of Education (NIE). Hutchins's work has focused on dissemination of educational research and development products. He has served as chair of the Council for Educational Development and Research (CEDAR), and he is currently a program chair for the International Society for the Systems Sciences (ISSS), focusing attention on education as a system.

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Research and Education Reform: Roles for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement GREGG B. JACKSON is the study director for the Committee on the Federal Role in Education Research and a senior staff officer at the National Research Council. Formerly, he was director of research for the International City Management Association, a project director at the Center for the Study of Services, and a senior scientist at the George Washington University. His research and writing has been in the areas of program evaluation, meta-analysis, postsecondary and adult education, and the education of minority youth. He has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Hawaii and a Ph.D. degree in education planning and policy from the University of California at Berkeley. BEVERLY JIMENEZ is the consulting principal for the Collaboration for Educational Excellence, a San Francisco-based school restructuring project aimed at significantly improving educational opportunities for children of poverty. During her 22 years with the San Francisco Unified School District, she has served as a classroom teacher and elementary school principal and as founder and head teacher of a collaboratively administered elementary school. Her work has centered on issues of organizational development and change, collaborative leadership development, and child-centered instructional strategies. She currently serves on the advisory board to the International Network of Principals Centers and on the planning board of the San Francisco Principals' Center. She has a B.A. degree in english literature from Ohio University and an M.A. degree in educational administration from San Francisco State University. CHARLES F. MANSKI is Wolfowitz professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research spans econometric theory, the economics of education, and the empirical analysis of individual behavior. He is presently editor of the Journal of Human Resources and recently completed a term as director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. He is fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Manski received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ANNE S. MAVOR is a senior research associate for the Committee on the Federal Role in Education Research. She joined the National Research Council in 1989 as associate study director for the Committee on Performance Appraisal for Merit Pay and is currently serving as study director for the Committee on Military Enlistment Standards. Her work has been concentrated in the areas of testing, training, decision making, and information system design for The College Board and other private organizations. She has a master's degree in experimental psychology from Purdue University. PAUL E. PETERSON is Henry Lee Shattuck professor of government and director of the Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University.

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Research and Education Reform: Roles for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement Formerly, he was professor of public policy at Johns Hopkins University and director of government studies at the Bookings Institution. He is the author or coauthor of When Federalism Works, The Politics of School Reform, 1870–1940, School Politics Chicago Style, City Limits, and numerous articles on education, urban affairs, and welfare policy. Two of his books have received awards from the American Political Science Association. Peterson received a B.A. degree from Concordia College and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. ANDREW C. PORTER is a professor of educational psychology and director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has also served on the faculty at Michigan State University, where he was associate dean for research and graduate study and codirector of the Institute for Research on Teaching. He was a visiting scholar and an associate director of basic skills research at the National Institute of Education. Porter has published on psychometrics, student and teacher assessment, teaching research, and education policy. He has served on the editorial boards of eight professional journals including, currently, the American Journal of Education and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Porter has a B.S. degree in education from Indiana State University and master's and Ph.D degrees in educational psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ALBERT H. QUIE is president emeritus and a member of the board of Prison Fellowship Ministries. He also serves on the boards of several corporations and other nonprofit organizations. Formerly, he was governor of Minnesota and a U.S. Representative from that state. In the latter position he served on the House Education and Labor Committee and played key roles in the passage of the Higher Education Act—Student Aid Act, the Education of All Handicapped Children Act, and the Vocational Education Act. He has received nine honorary doctorate degrees and several awards for his contributions to education and to the disabled. MARILEE RIST is a senior editor for The American School Board Journal and The Executive Educator magazines, both published by the National School Boards Association. As a long-time education journalist, she has visited school districts across the nation and written on a wide range of education topics. She has received numerous awards from the Education Writers' Association and from the Society of National Association Publications and was a finalist in the National Magazine Awards competition for her article on merit pay for teachers. SUSAN M. ROGERS served as research associate for the Committee on the Federal Role in Education Research and is currently working as a program officer at the Institute of Medicine. Previously, she served on the staff of

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Research and Education Reform: Roles for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement the National Research Council's Committee on Population and the Committee on AIDS Research and the Social, Behavioral, and Statistical Sciences. She received a B.A. degree in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an M.A. degree in demography from Georgetown University. CAROL WEISS is a professor at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She has published eight books on the route from research to decisions: methods of evaluation research, the influences of research on policy, and channels through which research and other forms of information reach decision-making arenas. Weiss has been a congressional fellow, a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, visiting professor at Arizona State University, and senior fellow with the Department of Education. She has been a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the U.S. General Accounting Office, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. Department of Education, and other governmental and voluntary organizations. She holds a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Columbia University. KENNETH WILSON is Hazel C. Youngberg Trustees distinguished professor of physics at Ohio State University and coprincipal investigator for Ohio's Project Discovery, one of the National Science Foundation's statewide systemic science and mathematics reform initiatives. Previously, he served as professor of physics and director of the supercomputer center at Cornell University. Wilson's research has been in elementary particle theory, condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry, and computer science. He has received several awards for his contributions, including the Nobel Prize in Physics (1982). He is member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. Wilson received an undergraduate degree from Harvard and a Ph.D. degree from the California Institute of Technology.