Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design Appendixes

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design This page in the original is blank.

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design A Committee Member Biographies WILLIAM C. WEBSTER, Chairman, is full professor of naval architecture and associate dean of engineering for student affairs at the University of California at Berkeley. He is a leading national authority on ship maneuvering and has been heavily involved in the hydrodynamic aspects of ship model testing and in the mathematical developments underlying shiphandling computer simulation. Dr. Webster has published on both the hydrodynamic and operational aspects of ship maneuvering, has served as member and chairman of the Marine Board, and currently is a member of the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. He received his B.S. degree in naval architecture and marine engineering from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering science/naval architecture from the University of California at Berkeley. WILLIAM A. ARATA is a state and federally licensed pilot with Biscayne Bay Pilots in the Port of Miami, Florida. Prior experience includes 20 years in the U.S. Navy where he served primarily in the submarine fleet in capacities from watch officer to commanding officer. He also directed naval analysis programs of the Office of Naval Research and submarine electronic programs for the deputy chief of Naval Operations, Submarines. Captain Arata received a B.S. degree from the U.S. Naval Academy, a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, and a M.S. degree in business administration from the George Washington University.

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design RODERICK A. BARR is a principal in Hydronautics Research, Inc. He has 30 years experience in marine hydrodynamic research and development, analysis, and design. Previously, he was a principal in Tracor Hydronautics. His experience includes development of theoretical methods; computer-based, time-domain simulation studies; model testing; and design studies. Dr. Barr has lectured on ship hydrodynamics at the Catholic University, and authored numerous technical papers and reports. He received a B.S. degree in naval architecture and marine engineering from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture, a M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Maryland, and a Ph.D. degree in naval architecture from the University of California at Berkeley. PAUL CHILCOTE is senior director for planning, budget, and environmental affairs at the Port of Tacoma. He is responsible for coordinating port development into long-range planning, management of the port's Capital Improvement Program, and environmental management. Previously, Mr. Chilcote was a consultant for the State of Washington, specializing in port, rail, and marine transportation; manager, Intermodal Market Planning-International with the Southern Pacific Transportation Company; and senior trade analyst and senior long-range planner with the Port of Seattle. Mr. Chilcote received a B.S. degree in international/urban geography and history from Long Beach State University and a M.S. degree in economics/transportation geography from Oregon State University. MICHAEL DENNY is president of ShipSim Corporation. During the study, he was systems architect with the Data Systems Division, Grumman Corporation, where he managed the technical development program, concentrating on systems architecture, expert systems, and artificial intelligence. Earlier, Dr. Denny was program manager with Ship Analytics, Inc., where he managed port and waterway design, vessel navigation bridge procedures, and human performance experiments at the Computer Aided Operations Research Facility, Kings Point, New York. His work has spanned both shiphandling simulation for waterway studies and leading edge computer simulation developments with human interaction. Dr. Denny has also served as assistant professor in the psychology department at Michigan State University. Dr. Denny received his B.S., M.A., and Ph.D, degrees in experimental psychology from Michigan State University. FRANCIS X. NICASTRO is coordinator, industry affairs, with the Transportation Department, Exxon Company International. Previously as manager, Chartered Ship Operations and Port Services, he was responsible for the Exxon-sponsored simulation study of the navigability of tankers in the oil port of Coatzacoalcos, Mexico, which was conducted at the Computer Aided Operations Research Facility. Other technical and managerial service with Exxon Company International have included chartering manager, commercial support manager, and vice president and manager, New Con-

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design struction Office, Kobe, Japan. Mr. Nicastro has served on various technical panels of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. He received a B.S. degree in naval architecture from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture. NILS H. NORRBIN is internationally known for his work in ship hydrodynamics, maneuvering, and shiphandling simulation. Dr. Norrbin retired from the Swedish State Shipbuilding Experimental Tank (SSPA) in 1991 as senior scientific advisor and project manager. Previous positions with SSPA included head, Dynamics Division, and head, Ship Dynamics Division, of the Research Department. Dr. Norrbin is a fellow of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects and a member of Fachmitglied, Schiftbautechnische Gesellschaft. He has served on many international committees concerned with ship maneuvering, has pioneered research in the effects of realistic ship channel boundary effects on navigation, and was visiting professor of naval architecture, Department of Ocean Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Earlier work included naval design with the Royal Swedish Naval Administration. Dr. Norrbin received a M.Sc. degree in naval architecture from the Chalmers University of Technology, a Technical License in Ship Hydraulics and Mathematics, and the Dr. Technology degree from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. JOSEPH J. PUGLISI is associate director, Office of Computer Resource, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. He is responsible for all academic and administrative computing at the academy including integration of computers into the curriculum. Previously, Mr. Puglisi was managing director, Computer Aided Operations Research Facility (CAORF), where he was responsible for over 100 shiphandling simulation studies leading to formal reports. He directed the development of upgrade plans for CAORF, including marketing, research, system expansion, design and engineering, manpower, and funding. He subsequently coordinated field-level components of the privatization of CAORF. Mr. Puglisi received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the City College, City University of New York, and a M.S. degree in electrical engineering from New York University. He is pursuing advanced studies at the University of Wales. LEONARD E. VAN HOUTEN is a consulting engineer with over 35 years experience worldwide in charge of planning, design, and construction of industrial facilities for marine transportation, oil and gas production, mining, heavy manufacturing, and defense-related activities. He has led development of waterway improvement projects in 45 countries representing all continents and a complete range of climatological conditions. Mr. Van Houten previously was a member of the Marine Board's Committee on Sedimentation Control to Reduce Maintenance Dredging of Navigation Facilities in Estuaries and is active in a number of technical and professional

OCR for page 89
Shiphandling Simulation: Application to Waterway Design societies. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. JAMES A. VINCENT manages the Aeronautical and Marine Systems Department with Systems Control Technology. His experience is in flight mechanics, with specialization in system identification air vehicle mathematical modeling, control system design, simulation testing, handling qualities analysis, and wind tunnel testing and aerodynamic configuration development. Previously, Mr. Vincent served with the Boeing Company where he validated flight simulation by actual flight tests. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Colorado.