PLATE 1 Average global sea level variability for 1987 and 1988. Data were obtained by the Geosat satellite altimeter. Figure provided by C. J. Koblinsky, NASA.

PLATE 2 Multiyear composite of global ocean pigment concentration (November 1978 to June 1986). Data were acquired by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner on the Nimbus-7 satellite. Purple and blue areas contained low concentrations of pigment in surface water and yellow and red areas indicate high concentrations of pigment. Figure provided by Gene Feldman, NASA.



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OCR for page 203
Oceanography in the Next Decade: Building New Partnerships PLATE 1 Average global sea level variability for 1987 and 1988. Data were obtained by the Geosat satellite altimeter. Figure provided by C. J. Koblinsky, NASA. PLATE 2 Multiyear composite of global ocean pigment concentration (November 1978 to June 1986). Data were acquired by the Coastal Zone Color Scanner on the Nimbus-7 satellite. Purple and blue areas contained low concentrations of pigment in surface water and yellow and red areas indicate high concentrations of pigment. Figure provided by Gene Feldman, NASA.

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Oceanography in the Next Decade: Building New Partnerships PLATE 3 Sea surface temperature during a non-El Niño year. The warm water is located in the western Pacific. The 29°C isotherm is located at 170°E. Satellite data processed and provided by Dr. Xiao-Hai Yan at the Center for Remote Sensing, University of Delaware. PLATE 4 Sea surface temperature during an El Niño year. The warm water extends to the central and eastern Pacific. The 29°C isotherm extends to 150°E. Satellite data processed and provided by Dr. Xiao-Hai Yan at the Center for Remote Sensing, University of Delaware.

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Oceanography in the Next Decade: Building New Partnerships PLATE 6 Integration of GLORIA data with bathymetric data has proven extremely effective in visualizing seafloor geology. This photo shows a perspective view of a portion of the Florida Escarpment with the small ravines cut into it and the meandering channel running across the abyssal plain floor at the base of the escarpment. Photo courtesy of Dr. David Twichell, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. PLATE 7 Shaded relief image of Seabeam bathymetry along the Texas-Louisiana continental slope. Data collected by the NOAA National Ocean Survey. This image shows part of the Sigsbee Escarpment, several collapse basins north of the escarpment, and one salt diaper south of the escarpment. Area shown is approximately 50 by 60 nautical miles. Photo courtesy of Dr. David Twichell, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

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Oceanography in the Next Decade: Building New Partnerships PLATE 5 Sea surface temperature difference between an El Niño year and a non-El Niño year. Satellite data processed and provided by Dr. Xiao-Hai Yan at the Center for Remote Sensing, University of Delaware.