Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Michael R. Ladisch is professor of bioprocess and agricultural engineering and group leader of the Research and Process Engineering Group in the Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering at Purdue University. He received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Drexel University in 1973 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University in 1974 and 1977, respectively. Dr. Ladisch's research interests are in bioseparations, kinetics of biochemical reactions, chemical-reaction engineering, and biomass conversion. In 1978, he joined the faculty at Purdue University as assistant professor, and he has been a full professor since 1985. He has written numerous papers and book chapters and has worked actively with industry in implementing fundamental research results in the form of new process technology. He received the U.S. Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1984 and the James Van Lanen Distinguished Service Award of the American Chemical Society's Biochemical Technology Division in 1990.

Charles L. Cooney is professor of chemical engineering and biochemical engineering in the Department of Chemical Engineering, co-director of the program on the pharmaceutical industry, and associate director for industrial activities at the Biotechnology Processing Engineering Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. He obtained his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1966 and his master's and Ph.D. degrees in biochemical engineering from MIT in 1967 and 1970, respectively. After working briefly at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research, he joined the faculty of MIT as



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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Michael R. Ladisch is professor of bioprocess and agricultural engineering and group leader of the Research and Process Engineering Group in the Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering at Purdue University. He received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Drexel University in 1973 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University in 1974 and 1977, respectively. Dr. Ladisch's research interests are in bioseparations, kinetics of biochemical reactions, chemical-reaction engineering, and biomass conversion. In 1978, he joined the faculty at Purdue University as assistant professor, and he has been a full professor since 1985. He has written numerous papers and book chapters and has worked actively with industry in implementing fundamental research results in the form of new process technology. He received the U.S. Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1984 and the James Van Lanen Distinguished Service Award of the American Chemical Society's Biochemical Technology Division in 1990. Charles L. Cooney is professor of chemical engineering and biochemical engineering in the Department of Chemical Engineering, co-director of the program on the pharmaceutical industry, and associate director for industrial activities at the Biotechnology Processing Engineering Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. He obtained his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1966 and his master's and Ph.D. degrees in biochemical engineering from MIT in 1967 and 1970, respectively. After working briefly at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research, he joined the faculty of MIT as

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering an assistant professor in 1970 and has been a full professor since 1982. His research interests are in computer control of biological processes, downstream processing for recovery of biological products, bioreactor design and operation, and manufacturing strategies in the pharmaceutical industry. He has received the Institute of Biotechnological Studies 1989 Gold Medal, the Food, Pharmaceutical and Bioengineering Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the James Van Lanen Distinguished Service Award from the American Chemical Society's Division of Microbial and Biochemical Technology and was recently elected to the American Institute of Medical and Biochemical Engineers. He serves as a consultant to or director of a number of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies and is on boards of several professional journals. Robert C. Dean, Jr. is the founder of two bioprocessing companies: Verax (production mammalian-cell culture systems) and Synosys (now PerSeptive Biosystems, Inc., production protein-purification systems). He has also founded four other companies: Creare, Inc., Hypertherm, Inc., Creare Innovations, Inc. (now Spectra, Inc.), and Dean Technology, Inc. He holds Sc.D. (1954), M.S. (1949), and B.S. (1948) degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1987, Dr. Dean founded the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Bioprocess Engineering Program. Dr. Dean was an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at MIT in 1951–1956. He was head of advanced engineering at Ingersoll-Rand Company in 1956–1960. He became associate professor in 1961 and later professor of engineering at Dartmouth College. He is a professor of engineering (adjunct) at Dartmouth and at Northeastern University. He heads his firm, Dean Technology, Inc., Lebanon, New Hampshire, where he is developing innovation processes, materials, and equipment for the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals specifically and biochemicals in general; for medical applications; for machining difficult materials; and for advanced materials fabrication. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Arthur E. Humphrey received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from the University of Idaho in 1948 and 1950, respectively. He received a Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from Columbia University in 1953. Dr. Humphrey joined the University of Pennsylvania in 1953 and conducted research and taught there until 1980. In 1960, he obtained an M.S. degree in food technology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. At the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Humphrey served as chair of the Chemical Engineering Department for 10 years and dean of engineering and applied science for 8 years. He moved to Lehigh University in

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering 1980, where he served for 6 years as provost and academic vice president and then held the positions of T. L. Diamond Professor of Biochemical Engineering and director of the Center for Molecular Bioscience and Biotechnology. In 1992, he became director of the Biotechnology Institute and professor of chemical engineering at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Humphrey's work on the design and control of bioprocesses has yielded more than 250 research papers, three books, and four patents. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. In 1984, Dr. Humphrey chaired the Research Briefing Panel for the Office of Science and Technology Policy on "Chemical and Process Engineering for Biotechnology." He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. T. Kent Kirk received his B.S. degree from Louisiana Polytechnic University in 1962 and his M.S. and Ph.D. (biochemistry, plant pathology) from North Carolina State University in 1964 and 1968, respectively. He completed postdoctoral studies in organic chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. Dr. Kirk is now director of the Institute for Microbial and Biochemical Technology, USDA Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. He is also professor in the Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and adjunct professor, Department of Wood and Paper Science, at North Carolina State University. Dr. Kirk's research has focused almost entirely on the microbiology, chemistry, and biochemistry of the fungal degradation of lignin and on industrial applications of fungi. He has received a number of awards and honors, including the USDA Superior Service Award and the Marcus Wallenberg Prize from Sweden. In 1988, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Larry V. McIntire is the E. D. Butcher Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering at Rice University. He is also chair of the Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering and director of the Cox Laboratory for Biomedical Engineering within the institute. Dr. McIntire received his B.Ch.E. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University in 1966 and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1970—all in chemical engineering. He has been at Rice University since 1970. His research interests include the effects of flow on mammalian-cell metabolism, molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion, tissue engineering, mammalian-cell culture, and bioengineering aspects of vascular biology. Dr. McIntire is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health MERIT Award and is a founding fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. McIntire was the 1992 ALZA Distinguished Lecturer of the Biomedical Engineering Society and the 1992 recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering Food, Pharmaceutical, and Bioengineering Division Award.

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering Alan S. Michaels received the Sc.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in chemical engineering in 1948, joined the faculty of MIT on graduation, and became full professor in 1961. In 1962, he founded and became president of Amicon Corporation, which pioneered the development of membrane ultrafiltration as a novel molecular-separation process. Dr. Michaels resigned his tenure position at MIT in 1966 to devote full time to the management of Amicon, where he remained as president until 1970, when he founded and became president of Pharmetrics, Inc., Palo Alto, California, a company engaged in research and development of controlled drug-delivery systems, in collaboration with ALZA Corporation. Pharmetrics was merged into ALZA in 1972, and Dr. Michaels became senior vice president and technical director of ALZA and president of its research division. He was instrumental in the development of ALZA's transdermal (TRANSDERM) and oral osmotic (OROS) delivery systems, which are now in widespread use around the world. In 1976, he became professor of chemical engineering and medicine at Stanford University, where he remained until 1981. He then returned to New York and Boston to conduct an independent industrial-consulting practice. In 1986, he joined the chemical-engineering faculty at North Carolina State University as distinguished university professor. He retired from his faculty position in 1989 (he is currently distinguished professor, emeritus) and returned to Boston to resume his full-time industrial-consulting practice as president of Alan Sherman Michaels, Sc.D., Inc. He is the author or coauthor of more than 140 refereed journal articles and contributed to eight textbooks and monographs. His honors include the McGraw-Hill Outstanding Personal Achievement Award in Chemical Engineering; 37th Institute Lecturer of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE); the Food, Pharmaceutical, and Bioengineering Award of AIChE; the Materials Engineering and Science Award of AIChE; and the ACS Award in Separation Science and Technology. He was honored as Ninth Centennial Chemical Engineering Lecturer, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy, in 1988. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Paula Myers-Keith is director of bioprocess research at Pitman-Moore, Inc., where she is responsible for directing research programs in molecular biology, microbial genetics, fermentation-process development, and bioseparations. In addition, she chairs Pitman-Moore's corporate technology-assessment group with responsibility for evaluation of new technology and its application to novel animal products or veterinary pharmaceuticals. Dr. Keith holds a bachelor's degree in biology (1971, West Liberty State College), an M.S. in microbiology (1978, West Virginia University), and a Ph.D. in microbiology (1978, Virginia Polytechnic Institute). After a year of postdoctoral research, she joined Pitman-Moore, where her primary research interest has been fermentation-process development of new animal

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering products (recombinant growth hormones, polyether antibiotics, vaccines, anabolics). She has written more than 25 papers and patents. Dr. Keith has served on the board of directors of the Society for Industrial Microbiology for several years and recently completed a term as president. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Industrial Microbiology and was the 1992 recipient of the Charles Porter Award. Dewey D. Y. Ryu is professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and director of the Biochemical Engineering Program at the University of California, Davis. He received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering in 1961 and Ph.D. degree in biochemical engineering in 1967—both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He worked for several years as a senior research engineer at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research (now Bristol-Myers Squibb). He was one of the founding members of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science in Seoul, where he was professor and chair of the Department of Biotechnology. He joined the University of California, Davis in 1981. His research interests include recombinant and nonrecombinant fermentation technology, biocatalysis and enzyme engineering, large-scale mammalian-and plant-cell cultivation technology for production of biologically active compounds of medical importance, use of renewable resources, and bioseparations. He has contributed about 160 scientific publications and 17 invention patents dealing with novel products, bioprocesses, and bioreactor design, all applicable to production of new gene products, antibiotics, steroid hormones, enzymes, and food additives. He has provided a wide range of professional services to industry, national and international professional organizations, government organizations, and other academic institutions, including membership of the editorial boards of biotechnology journals and of study groups and review committees for the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the National Research Council, the United Nations, and other academic and research organizations. James R. Swartz obtained his B.Ch.E. degree from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. After working for 2 years for Union Oil Co. of California, he attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned his M.S. and D.Sc. in chemical engineering and biochemical engineering, respectively. His focus on the development and control of fermentation processes led him to a scientific exchange visit to the USSR and to employment at Eli Lilly and Co. in Indianapolis. In 1981, he went to Genentech, first serving as a scientist and then forming and serving as director of the Department of Fermentation Research and Process Development. He returned to active research and development, focusing on the expression and secretion of mammalian proteins from E. coli in 1988. He is also active in the development of large-scale bacterial fermentation process-

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering es and is serving as insulin-like growth factor-I project team leader at Genentech. He is a member of several professional societies and has served as program chairman and division chairman for the American Chemical Society Division of Biochemical Technology. Daniel I. C. Wang is Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering and director of the Biotechnology Process Engineering Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Wang received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering and his M.S. degree in biochemical engineering from MIT in 1959 and 1961, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1963. Professor Wang's research interests include transport phenomena in animal-cell bioreactors, biosensors in bioprocess monitoring and control, protein purification and protein refolding in downstream processing, bioreactor design in viscous fermentations, and oxygen transfer in fermentation vessels. His work has produced four books, more than 150 publications, and 11 patents. He currently serves on the National Institutes of Health Board on Biotechnology Policy, the National Research Council Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology and Board on Biology, the NRC Committee on Biotechnology, the National Academy of Engineering Peer Review Committee, the Republic of China Biotechnology Center Advisory Board, and the Singapore Science Council Advisory Board. Professor Wang was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986. Janet Westpheling is an assistant professor of genetics at the University of Georgia. Dr. Westpheling received her B.S. degree in microbiology from Purdue University and her Ph.D. in genetics from the John Innes Institute in 1980 and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. Her primary research interest involves the control of gene expression in Streptomyces, with emphasis on the study of carbon utilization and primary metabolism and the strategies used by bacteria to regulate genes involved in morphogenesis and secondary metabolism. George M. Whitesides received his A.B. degree from Harvard University in 1960 and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1964. He was a member of the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1963 to 1982. He joined the Department of Chemistry of Harvard University in 1982 and was department chairman in 1986–1989. He is now Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University. His present research interests include biochemistry, surface chemistry, materials science, reaction mechanisms, and catalysis. His recent advisory positions include service on the National Research Council Board on Chemical Sci-

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Putting Biotechnology to Work Bioprocess Engineering ences and Technology (1984–1989), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Defense Science Research Council (1984–), the MIT Advisory Committee for Lincoln Laboratory (1985–), the NRC Naval Studies Board (1989–), the NRC Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (1991–), and the National Science Foundation Materials Research Advisory Committee. He received an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in 1968, the American Chemical Society Award in Pure Chemistry in 1975, the Harrison Howe Award (Rochester Section of the American Chemical Society) in 1979, an Alumni Distinguished Service Award (California Institute of Technology) in 1983, the Remsen Award (American Chemical Society, Maryland) in 1983, and an Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award (American Chemical Society) in 1989. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.