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APPENDIXES



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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite APPENDIXES

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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite This page in the original is blank.

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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite A Scientific and Background Presentations Made to the Committee January 6, 1992 David Saumweber, Director, Office of Archives and Information Services, National Academy of Sciences. Historical Background: The Role of the National Academy of Sciences During World War II. Robert Cook-Deegan, Institute of Medicine; Linda Rosenstock, University of Washington; Bailus Walker, Jr., University of Oklahoma. Poison Gas: A Continuing Threat, Experiences from Korea and Iraq. April 15-16, 1992 Bruno Papirmeister, Science Applications International Corporation. Current Research into the Biological Mechanisms of Mustard Gas Toxicity. Frederick Sidell, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Clinical Aspects of Mustard Gas. Howard Skipper, Southern Research Institute (retired). Chemical Warfare Research During World War II. Robert Ursano, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Psychological Aspects of Chemical Warfare Environments. Karen Freeman, Pennsylvania State University. Researching the World War II Testing Programs. Annetta Watson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Outline of Concurrent Activities Dealing with Chemical Weapons Disposal and Risk Assessment.

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Veterans at Risk: The Health Effects of Mustard Gas and Lewisite JUNE 11-12, 1992 Robert L. Dedrick, National Cancer Institute. Toxicology Lessons from Cancer Chemotherapy. David H. Wegman, University of Massachusetts. Examination of the Effects of Certain Acute Environmental Exposures on Future Respiratory Health Consequences. O. Michael Colvin, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Nitrogen Mustard Therapy and Second Cancers. James M. Melius, State of New York Department of Health. The Bhopal Disaster. Han K. Kang, Department of Veterans Affairs. Feasibility of Developing a Cohort of Veterans Exposed to Mustard Gas During WWII Testing Programs. Richard Solana, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. Toxicology of Lewisite. Peter Sandman, Rutgers University. Communicating Risk. Jay Katz, Yale University. Informed Consent: History, Development, and Application to Special Populations.