Click for next page ( 271


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 270
Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Pane] Members and Staff GRAHAM KALTON (Chair) is senior statistician and vice president of Westat, Inc., in Rockville, Maryland. Previously he was research scientist in the Survey Research Center and professor of biostatistics at the Univer- sity of Michigan. Prior to that he was professor of social statistics at the University of Southampton and reader in social statistics at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in survey sampling and general survey methodology. He received a B.Sc. degree in economics and an M.Sc. degree in statistics from the University of London and a Ph.D. degree in survey methodology from the University of Southampton. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science and is the current president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians. He has been a member of the Committee on National Statistics; served as a member of its Panel to Evaluate the National Center for Education Statistics and of the Panel on the National Health Care Survey; and was the chair of the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System. PAUL P. BIEMER is principal scientist and manager of the Survey Method- ology Staff at Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Before joining RTI in 1991, he was chair of the Department of Experimental Statistics and director of the University Statistics Center at New Mexico State University. Prior to that, Biemer was assistant chief of the Statistical Research Division at the Bureau of the Census in Washing 270

OCR for page 270
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 271 ton, D.C., and has held various positions within the Census Bureau since 1978. In 1985 the Bureau of the Census awarded him its bronze medal for superior federal service. Biemer is also currently chair of the Survey Re- search Methods Section and serves on the Committee on Energy Statistics of the American Statistical Association. He serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Official Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. His research interests involve the design and estimation of nonsampling error in sample surveys, survey methodology, and quality man- agement for survey operations. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University. GORDON J. BRACKSTONE is assistant chief statistician responsible for statistical methodology, computing, and geography at Statistics Canada. From 1982 to 1985 he was the director-general of the Methodology Branch at Statistics Canada, and previously he was responsible for surveys and data acquisition in the Central Statistical Office of British Columbia. His pro- fessional work has been in survey methodology, particularly the assessment of the quality of survey data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. lIe received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in statistics from the London School of Economics. CONSTANCE F. CITRO (Study Director) is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statis- tical Association/National Science Foundation (NSF) research fellow at the Bureau of the Census. For the Committee on National Statistics, she has served or is currently serving as study director for the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System, the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology, the Panel on Statistics on Supply and Demand for Precollege Science and Mathematics Teachers, and the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs. Her research has focused on the usefulness and accessi- bility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to in- come measurement and demographic change. She is a fellow of the Amen- can Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. CLIFFORD C. CLOGG is professor of sociology and statistics at the Penn- sylvania State University. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Asso- ciation and the Sociological Research Association. He has been the editor of Sociological Methodology and the coordinating and applications editor of

OCR for page 270
272 APPENDIX C the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He has served on the Board of Directors of the American Statistical Association and the Popula- tion Association of America. His research interests include the demography of the labor force and statistical methods for categorical data. He received a B.A. degree in sociology from Ohio University and an M.S. degree in statistics and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. MARTIN HEIDENHAIN DAVID is professor of economics at the Univer- sity of Wisconsin-Madison. His research has explored a variety of prob- lems relating to taxation and transfer programs. Investigating those topics with data on individuals and families has led him to become expert in problems of managing complex data, including the design of information systems to support such data. Together with Alice Robbin and Tom Flory, he designed an integrated system that served as a national facility for re- search on the Survey of Income and Program Participation. PC-SIPPTEST and its accompanying manual, Analyzing Complex Data, provide a personal computer subsample of the data for exploratory learning and development of research queries. tie serves as adviser to the Statistics of Income Divi- sion of the Internal Revenue Service and is a member of the Committee on National Statistics and the Advisory Board of the German Socio-economic Panel Study. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and received a B.A. degree from Swarthmore and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Michigan. GREG J. DUNCAN is program director at the Survey Research Center and professor of economics at the University of Michigan. His research areas are in income distribution and poverty as well as methodological issues associated with household panel studies. For the past 10 years he has been codirector of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics project, which has con- ducted annual interviews with a representative sample of U.S. households since 1968. He received a B.A. degree from Grinnell College and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. RALPH E. FOLSOM is chief scientist for Survey and Computing Sciences at the Research Triangle Institute. From 1985 to 1988 he was acting direc- tor of RTI's Center for Research in Statistics, in which he held various positions since 1970. His area of expertise is the design and analysis of complex probability samples. In addition to his innovative work on many of the complex survey efforts conducted by RTI, he has made significant contributions to the development of RTI's computer software for survey data analysis. These contributions include sample design-based modes of estimation and inference for linear and logistic regression coefficients. Re

OCR for page 270
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 273 cently he collaborated with RTI colleagues in the implementation of soft- ware for fitting continuous time "Cox Proportional Hazards" models to survey data. His recent work on generalized raking has led to efficient software for survey weight adjustments. He is a member of the Working Group on Technical Aspects of SIPP of the Survey Research Methods Sec- tion of the American Statistical Association and of the Board of Governors for the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. He received a B.S. degree from Texas A&M University in wildlife management, an M.S. in statistics from Iowa State University, and a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina. ROBERT M. HAWSER is Vilas research professor of sociology and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, where he has been on the faculty since 1969. He has also held a faculty appointment at Brown University and visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Vienna and at the University of Bergen. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. His doctoral thesis was chosen for publi- cation in the Rose Monograph Series of the American Sociological Associa- tion, and he has won the Paul F. Lazarsfeld award in research methods from the American Sociological Association. lIe is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and the Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His publications related to education and social inequality include five books and numerous articles. His current research interests include trends in edu- cational progression and social mobility in the United States among racial and ethnic groups, the effects of families on social and economic inequality, and changes in socioeconomic standing, health, and well-being across the life course. V. JOSEPH HOTZ is associate professor in the Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. He serves as the direc- tor of the Population Research Center at the University of Chicago and the National Opinion Research Center, Inc.; is a research associate at the Insti- tute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and is a coeditor of the Journal of Labor Economics. He also is a member of the Department of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on the JOBS Evaluation. His primary research interests are in the areas of labor force and population dynamics, the econometrics of dynamic choice mod- els, and the evaluation of social programs. His most recent work has inves

OCR for page 270
274 APPENDIX C ligated the use of nonexperimental methods in the evaluation of job training programs and the importance of child care regulations and other factors on the demand for and cost of child care in the United States. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin. RANDALL J. OLSEN is professor of economics and director of the Center for Human Resource Research at Ohio State University. He also serves as principal investigator on the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Mar- ket Experience. He is an associate editor for applications and case studies for the Journal of the American Statistical Association and serves on the social science and population study section for the National Institutes of Health. His primary research interests are in applied econometrics, eco- nomic demography, and labor economics with some recent work on survey methodology. He received a B.A. degree in economics and mathematics from Ripon College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Chicago. PATRICIA RUGGLES is a senior research associate at the Urban Institute, where she has been a staff member since 1984. She has written extensively on poverty, the distribution of income, and public income support programs. She has also directed a number of studies for the Food and Nutrition Ser- vice of the Department of Agnculture and for the Department of Health and Human Services, among others. In 1989-1990 she served as a senior econo- mist with the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress while on leave from the Institute. In 1987-1988 she was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the Bureau of the Census, where she studied determinants of the durations of poverty and welfare spells. She is the author of a book on alternatives in measuring poverty and numerous papers and articles, and has considerable experience in working with the SIPP data. Before joining the Urban Institute, she spent four years as an analyst at the Congressional Budget Office, where she was responsible for analyses of social security and means-tested trans- fer programs. At CBO she completed a series of studies of the distribu- tional impacts of tax and transfer program changes and directed a major study of legislative changes in human resources programs. She received a B.A. from Yale University and did graduate work in economics at Harvard University. Her dissertation examined the effects of taxes and program expenditures on households of different types. TERENCE SPEED is professor and chair in the Department of Statistics at the University of California at Berkeley. Prior to that, he was chief of the CSIRO Division of Mathematics and Statistics in Canberra, Australia, and

OCR for page 270
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 275 he has held academic posts in Australia and the United Kingdom. He received a Ph.D. from Monash University in Australia in mathematics, and he has published research in probability theory and theoretical statistics and in a number of applied areas. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.

OCR for page 270