Authors

H. GUYFORD STEVER (symposium chairman), a member of the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government, has had a career as a scientist, engineer, educator, and administrator. He holds an A.B. from Colgate University, a Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology, and numerous honorary degrees. In the past decade he has been a director of TRW Inc., Schering-Plough Corporation, and Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company; a trustee of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, of Science Service, and of Universities Research Association; and foreign secretary of the National Academy of Engineering. He was science and technology adviser to President Ford, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and an ex officio member of the President's Commission on Science and Technology. He was director of the National Science Foundation and, concurrently, science adviser to Presidents Nixon and Ford. He has also been a member of the National Science Board. Before his government service, he was president of Carnegie Mellon University during the period when the Carnegie Institute of Technology and Mellon Institute were merged. He was professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace Authors H. GUYFORD STEVER (symposium chairman), a member of the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government, has had a career as a scientist, engineer, educator, and administrator. He holds an A.B. from Colgate University, a Ph.D. in physics from the California Institute of Technology, and numerous honorary degrees. In the past decade he has been a director of TRW Inc., Schering-Plough Corporation, and Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company; a trustee of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, of Science Service, and of Universities Research Association; and foreign secretary of the National Academy of Engineering. He was science and technology adviser to President Ford, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and an ex officio member of the President's Commission on Science and Technology. He was director of the National Science Foundation and, concurrently, science adviser to Presidents Nixon and Ford. He has also been a member of the National Science Board. Before his government service, he was president of Carnegie Mellon University during the period when the Carnegie Institute of Technology and Mellon Institute were merged. He was professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace as head of the departments of mechanical engineering and naval architecture and marine engineering. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Royal Aeronautical Society, and the Royal Society of Arts; a foreign associate of the Japan Academy of Engineering and a foreign member of Britain's Fellowship of Engineering. He has received the President's Certificate of Merit for his work in World War II, the Commander of the Order of Merit of Poland, Distinguished Public Service Medals of the Department of Defense and of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and other honors. RICHARD M. CARLSON is chief of the Advanced Systems Research and Analysis Office at Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. He earned a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Washington, an M.S. degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Seattle, and a Ph.D. degree in engineering mechanics from Stanford University. Before his career with Ames Research Laboratory, Dr. Carlson was employed in the aircraft industry for 24 years, during which time he was chief aerostructures engineer at Hiller Helicopters, Inc., and rotary-wing advanced design division engineer at the Lockheed California Company. He has been awarded three Army Meritorious Civilian Service awards and a Presidential Rank Meritorious Executive SES Award. He is a member of Sigma Xi and the Swedish Society of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is also a fellow in the British Royal Aeronautical Society, an honorary fellow of the American Helicopter Society and a recipient of that society's Klemin Award, a fellow in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. AARON COHEN is the director of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in Houston, Texas. Cohen received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University and an M.S. degree in applied mathematics from Stevens Institute of

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace Technology. He has taken advanced graduate study in mathematical physics at New York University and the University of California at Los Angeles. He received an Honorary Doctor of Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of Houston. Mr. Cohen's career at the Johnson Space Center began in the Apollo Spacecraft Program Office. He managed the hardware and software designed to provide guidance, navigation, and control for both the Command and Service Module (CSM) and the Lunar Module. He served as chief, Systems Integration Branch/Systems Engineering Division, and chief, Command Service Module Project Engineering Division. Mr. Cohen was also the manager for the Command and Service Modules unit of the Apollo Spacecraft Program. Prior to these assignments, he was a microwave tube design engineer at RCA and a senior research engineer at General Dynamics Corporation. Mr. Cohen is a fellow of the American Astronautics Society and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. His NASA awards include two Exceptional Service Medals, two Outstanding Leadership Medals, three Distinguished Service Medals, and an Engineer of the Year award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. WILLIAM J. PERRY is the deputy secretary of defense. He was formerly the chairman and chief executive officer of Technology Strategies & Alliances (formerly H&Q Technology Partners, Inc.) in Menlo Park, California, and also served part-time at Stanford University as a professor in the School of Engineering and as codirector of the Center for International Security and Arms Control. Dr. Perry received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, all in mathematics. Before forming Technology Strategies & Alliances, he was an executive vice president of Hambrecht & Quist Inc. (H&Q), an investment banking firm specializing in high-technology companies. Before joining H&Q, he was undersecretary of defense for research and engineering at the U.S. Department of Defense. He was one of the founders of ESL, Inc. and served as its president until he entered government service. Before that, he was with Sylvania/General Telephone and was the director of their Electronic Defense Labo-

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace ratories. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received the Army's Outstanding Service Medal, the Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Award two years in a row, and NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Other awards he has received include the Medal of Achievement by the American Electronics Association and the Knight Commander's Cross awarded by the Federal Republic of Germany. BRIAN H. ROWE is senior vice president of General Electric's Aircraft Engines Department, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Rowe received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering with honors from Kings College, Durham University. Most of Mr. Rowe's career has been with GE. He spent most of his early years with the company in design, development, and engineering, where he designed various types of vertical-takeoff-and-landing (VTOL) equipment. Mr. Rowe was elected vice president and general manager of the Airline Programs Division, and subsequently became vice president and general manager of the Aircraft Engineering Division. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He was awarded the Legion d'Honneur by the French Government. He was also awarded an honorary degree of doctor in science and technology from the University of Cincinnati. ALBERTUS D. WELLIVER is corporate senior vice president of the Engineering and Technology Division at the Boeing Company in Seattle, Washington. He earned a B.S. degree from Pennsylvania State University in mechanical engineering and completed the Stanford University Executive Business Program. After graduation from Penn State, Mr. Welliver joined the Research Division of Curtiss-Wright Corporation and remained there until he began his career with the Boeing Company. In his current position, he has responsibility for the company's critical, high-level engineering and technology development activities. He is a member of many professional organizations and has been selected as a fellow in the American Institute of

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is a member of the NASA Aeronautical Advisory Board and the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow in the Royal Aeronautical Society, and a past chairman of the National Research Council's Aeronautical and Space Engineering Board. He has been honored as a Penn State Outstanding Engineering Alumnus.

OCR for page 65
The Future of Aerospace This page in the original is blank.