APPENDIX C
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

JOHN D. BALDESCHWIELER received a B.Ch.E. degree from Cornell University and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. He was deputy director of the Office of Science and Technology, Executive Office of the President, and also served on the faculties of Stanford University and Harvard University. He was chairman of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology, where currently he is a professor of chemistry. Dr. Baldeschwieler is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests are molecular structure and spectroscopy including nuclear magnetic resonance, nuclear spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and application of these methods to biological systems.

JONATHAN W. AMY received a B.A. in Chemistry from Ohio Wesleyan University and a PhD. in Molecular spectros, in 1955 from Purdue University. He was a research associate chemist, associate professor and director of instrumentation at Purdue. He is a emeritus professor of chemistry at Purdue University. His research interests include chemical instrumentation, and areas of molecular and mass spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface chemistry.

ALFRED BLUMSTEIN received a B. Eng. in Physics and a Ph.D. degree in operations research from Cornell University. After employment at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory and the Institute for Defense Analyses, he joined the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University where he currently is the J. Erik Jonsson Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research and Dean of the School of Urban and Public Affairs. His research interests include quantitative and policy research in law enforcement and criminal justice; urban transportation; and family planning.

ARTHUR FRIES received a MA in Mathematics and a PhD. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin. He was a research and teaching assistant at Wisconsin University. He now works with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) where he is a staff member and project leader. He also is a part-time lecturer for George Mason University and the University of Southern California. His research interests include areas of test planning and evaluation methodology of major weapons systems as well as in reliability, statistics, and applied mathematics.

STANLEY S. HANNA received an A.B. degree and an honorary D.Sc. from Denison University and a Ph.D. degree in physics from Johns Hopkins University. After employment at Johns Hopkins University and Argonne National Laboratory he became a professor of physics at Stanford University. He was chairman of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society (APS) and served on the



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Detection of Explosives for Commercial Aviation Security APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS JOHN D. BALDESCHWIELER received a B.Ch.E. degree from Cornell University and a Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. He was deputy director of the Office of Science and Technology, Executive Office of the President, and also served on the faculties of Stanford University and Harvard University. He was chairman of the Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology, where currently he is a professor of chemistry. Dr. Baldeschwieler is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests are molecular structure and spectroscopy including nuclear magnetic resonance, nuclear spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and application of these methods to biological systems. JONATHAN W. AMY received a B.A. in Chemistry from Ohio Wesleyan University and a PhD. in Molecular spectros, in 1955 from Purdue University. He was a research associate chemist, associate professor and director of instrumentation at Purdue. He is a emeritus professor of chemistry at Purdue University. His research interests include chemical instrumentation, and areas of molecular and mass spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface chemistry. ALFRED BLUMSTEIN received a B. Eng. in Physics and a Ph.D. degree in operations research from Cornell University. After employment at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory and the Institute for Defense Analyses, he joined the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University where he currently is the J. Erik Jonsson Professor of Urban Systems and Operations Research and Dean of the School of Urban and Public Affairs. His research interests include quantitative and policy research in law enforcement and criminal justice; urban transportation; and family planning. ARTHUR FRIES received a MA in Mathematics and a PhD. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin. He was a research and teaching assistant at Wisconsin University. He now works with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) where he is a staff member and project leader. He also is a part-time lecturer for George Mason University and the University of Southern California. His research interests include areas of test planning and evaluation methodology of major weapons systems as well as in reliability, statistics, and applied mathematics. STANLEY S. HANNA received an A.B. degree and an honorary D.Sc. from Denison University and a Ph.D. degree in physics from Johns Hopkins University. After employment at Johns Hopkins University and Argonne National Laboratory he became a professor of physics at Stanford University. He was chairman of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society (APS) and served on the

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Detection of Explosives for Commercial Aviation Security Executive Committee of the APS. His research interests include nuclear physics and structure; giant resonances; polarizations of nuclear radiations; lifetimes of nuclear states; resonance absorption; Mossbauer effect; nuclear moments; analog states; hyperfine interactions; magnetism; and electron scattering. WILFRED A. (BILL) JACKSON received a B.S. in business administration from West Virginia University and a M.S. in management from George Washington University in 1954, and attended Industrial College of the Armed Forces at Ft. McNair, VA in 1974. He was with the U.S. Army for 26 years, before being employed by the BDM Corporation, Mitre Corporation, BWI Airport, before coming Director of Security and Facilitation, with the Airport Operators Council International until 1992, and has recently taken a position with the University of North Dakota as Assistant Professor for the Center for Aerospace Sciences. His research interests include airport operations, airport security, and computer-controlled access systems. RICHARD H. JUDY, received a BA degree in airport management at the University of Miami in 1953. He was employed as an Office Manager for Merrill Lynch, worked as an auditor for Florida State, was a senior auditor with Morgan, Altemus and Barrs, was a comptroller for Dade Co. Port Authority, Biggs Shipping Corporation, Royal Castle Systems, State of Florida Road Department, was Deputy Director Dade Council Aviation Department, and before becoming President of Richard H. Judy and Associates, he was Director of the Dade County Aviation Department. He was chairman of the Airport Operator's Council International, and is a member of several associations. His research is in the development of domestic and international aviation regulations, policy and law pertaining to airports, airlines, the environment and the consumer. BRUCE R. KOWALSKI received a B.A. degree in analytical chemistry, from Millikin University, and a PhD. from the University of Washington, Seattle. He was employed with the Shell Development Company as a chemist, was associate professor at Colorado State University, and is presently employed with the University of Washington, Seattle as associate professor. His research interests include areas of chemometrics, application of pattern recognition and other multivariant analysis methods to chemical data. HAROLD MCNAIR received a degree B.S. from the University of Arizona in analytical chemistry, along with his M.S. and PhD. He was employed with Esso Research & Engineering as a research chemist, as a technical director with the European Division of F&M Science Corporation, Amsterdam; was a general manager and became director of international operations Varian Aerograph, Switzerland, and marketing director with the California branch. He is currently employed as a professor of analytical chemistry at Virginia Polytech Institute and State University. kHis research interests are extensive experience in quantitative analysis of ionization detectors and temperature programming, trace gas analysis by ionization detectors, theory of chromatography.

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Detection of Explosives for Commercial Aviation Security DAVID MILLIGAN received a B.A. degree from Princeton University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana. After employment with 3M Company as well as Litton and Xonics Medical Systems he joined Abbott Laboratories where he is presently vice president of Diagnostic Products R&D. His research interests include photographic science immunodiagnostic systems and immunoassay techniques. JOHN R. ''Dick'' ORR, attended the Georgia Institute of Technology, worked with Delta Airlines, in the technical operations division, on aircraft structure, was engineering director, and is presently manager of operations service administration. His research interests are operational security matters, both domestic and international for Delta Air Lines. He is involved with security equipment selection, procurement, installation, and operational procedures to comply with FAA regulations, as well as basic understanding of how a security program must be integrated in an airport community. NORMAN SLAGG received a B.S. degree in chemistry from Brooklyn College and a Ph.D. degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, majoring in physical chemistry with an emphasis on kinetics. He obtained a fellowship to the National Bureau of Standards where he performed photochemical studies. After working for seven years in industry he obtained a position as a research chemist with the U.S. Army at Picatinny Arsenal. He is currently the chief of the Explosives and Warheads Branch. In addition, he has taught undergraduate physical chemistry part-time at Fairleigh Dickenson and Rutgers University for several years. His research interests include reaction kinetics, explosion phenomena, free radical reactions, thermal stability, and shock phenomena. MICHAEL STORY received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. After graduation he worked at Litton Industries in material science of microwave tubes and at Electronic Associates in the design and manufacture of residual gas analyzers. He was a cofounder of Finnigan Corporation. He is presently employed as Senior Vice President, and Technical Director of Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. His interests have been the research and development of mass spectrometers. HARVEY E. WEGNER received a B.S. degree from the University of Puget Sound and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Washington. After employment at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, he returned to Brookhaven as a Senior Scientist to build the three-stage Van de Graaff accelerator facility for low-energy heavy-ion physics. He then helped design and develop the relativistic heavy-ion capability of the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. His research interests include low-energy, heavy-ion accelerator design and construction, fast-neutron physics, low-energy reaction physics, and currently, relativistic heavy-ion physics. He has recently retired from Brookhaven.