APPENDIX C
About the Authors

Marcia Bartusiak

After obtaining an advanced degree in physics, Marcia Bartusiak has been covering the fields of astronomy and physics. Her work has appeared in a variety of national publications. A contributing editor of Discover magazine, she is also the author of ''Thursday's Universe," a layman's guide to the frontiers of astrophysics and cosmology, and "Through A Universe Darkly," a history of astronomers' centuries-long quest to discover the universe's composition. In 1982, Bartusiak was the first woman to receive the prestigious Science Writing Award from the American Institute of Physics. She now lives in Sudbury, Massachusetts.

Barbara Burke

Barbara Burke entered Harvard intending to study no more science than required, and certainly no math. Her opinion that science was dull changed as a result of a biology course and by two years as a science writer at MIT. Later, as a reporter for the Ithaca Journal, she won an American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse science writing award for a series on acid rain. Marriage to mathematician John Hubbard of Cornell convinced her that there was more to mathematics than what she had glimpsed from high school courses. She became intrigued by the challenge of communicating the ideas behind the formulas to people who think that math and related topics—physics, engineering, information processing—are boring, scary, or simply inaccessible without years of advanced training. She is now at work on a book in French on Fourier analysis and wavelets and has recently completed an article for the French Scientific American on the KAM theorem and its connection to longstanding problems in celestial mechanics. She currently resides in Ithaca, New York.

Andrew Chaikin

Andrew Chaikin is a Boston-based science writer who specializes in astronomy, planetary science, and space exploration. His articles have appeared in Popular Science, Air & Space/Smithsonian, Discover, OMNI, and other national



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A Positron Named Priscilla: Scientific Discovery at the Frontier APPENDIX C About the Authors Marcia Bartusiak After obtaining an advanced degree in physics, Marcia Bartusiak has been covering the fields of astronomy and physics. Her work has appeared in a variety of national publications. A contributing editor of Discover magazine, she is also the author of ''Thursday's Universe," a layman's guide to the frontiers of astrophysics and cosmology, and "Through A Universe Darkly," a history of astronomers' centuries-long quest to discover the universe's composition. In 1982, Bartusiak was the first woman to receive the prestigious Science Writing Award from the American Institute of Physics. She now lives in Sudbury, Massachusetts. Barbara Burke Barbara Burke entered Harvard intending to study no more science than required, and certainly no math. Her opinion that science was dull changed as a result of a biology course and by two years as a science writer at MIT. Later, as a reporter for the Ithaca Journal, she won an American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse science writing award for a series on acid rain. Marriage to mathematician John Hubbard of Cornell convinced her that there was more to mathematics than what she had glimpsed from high school courses. She became intrigued by the challenge of communicating the ideas behind the formulas to people who think that math and related topics—physics, engineering, information processing—are boring, scary, or simply inaccessible without years of advanced training. She is now at work on a book in French on Fourier analysis and wavelets and has recently completed an article for the French Scientific American on the KAM theorem and its connection to longstanding problems in celestial mechanics. She currently resides in Ithaca, New York. Andrew Chaikin Andrew Chaikin is a Boston-based science writer who specializes in astronomy, planetary science, and space exploration. His articles have appeared in Popular Science, Air & Space/Smithsonian, Discover, OMNI, and other national

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A Positron Named Priscilla: Scientific Discovery at the Frontier publications. His book on the Apollo lunar astronauts and their experiences will be published by Viking/Penguin in Spring 1994. A former editor of Sky & Telescope magazine, he is the co-editor of "The New Solar System," a compendium of planetary science issues now in its 3rd edition. He also authored a children's book, "Where Dinosaurs Walked," for World Book/Childcraft. Before entering the field of science writing in 1980, he served as a research geologist at the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Earth and Planetary Studies in Washington, D.C. He holds a bachelor's degree in geology from Brown University. Addison Greenwood Addison Greenwood is the author of six books, most recently "Science at the Frontier" (1992), published by National Academy Press. His magazine credits range from BrainWork to Rolling Stone. He writes about science for radio and television, and also lectures about the brain and mind. Greenwood lives in Washington, D.C., and is currently at work on a novel. T.A. Heppenheimer T.A. Heppenheimer holds a Ph.D in aerospace engineering, and has held research fellowships at the California Institute of Technology and the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, Germany. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Three of his hardcover books—"Colonies in Space" (1977), "Toward Distant Suns" (1979), and "The Man-Made Sun" (1984)—have been selections of the Book-of-the-Month Club and its affiliates. As a free-lance writer, he has contributed to most of the nation's popular magazines that deal with science and technology and is a frequent contributor to American Heritage. He also has written extensively on Air Force and naval technology. He lives in Fountain Valley, California. Michelle Hoffman Michelle Hoffman writes and edits articles about the life sciences with a particular emphasis on molecular and cell biology, biotechnology, immunology and genetics. She started her publishing career as a staff editor and the cover editor at Cell, and moved on to write for Focus , a weekly newsletter produced at Harvard Medical School. Later, she joined the news staff of Science as the magazine's northeast correspondent. In addition to her magazine work, she edited the molecular biology textbook Genes IV. She is now an associate editor for American Scientist and lives in North Carolina. David Holzman David Holzman is currently Washington editor of BioWorld, a daily fax newsletter on biotechnology. As a staff writer on science and medicine for Insight magazine, a position he held for five years, Holzman won first prize in feature writing in 1989 from the American College of Radiology for his cover story, "Imaging Unveils Medical Mysteries." Holzman has also freelanced articles for Science, Forbes, Mosaic, Business and Health, and numerous newspapers, including the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, and the Cleveland Plain Dealer . A cycling enthusiast, Holzman bicycled across America following his graduation from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1975. He resides in Washington, D.C. Elizabeth J. Maggio Elizabeth Maggio is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer. Her career in science journalism

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A Positron Named Priscilla: Scientific Discovery at the Frontier began in 1969 after graduation from New York University with a degree in geology. Maggio polished her journalism skills as a medical writer with a Manhattan public relations firm before joining the Arizona Daily Star (Tucson) where she served as science editor for nine years. She then left newspaper work for the University of Arizona to write about campus science news and founded what was to become a nationally recognized research magazine. In her spare time she earned a degree in Italian which led to a three-year consulting contract in Turin as the bilingual science editor for a major Italian aerospace company. Maggio's work has earned numerous state and national honors including the American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse science writing prize. Anne Simon Moffat Anne Simon Moffat is a Chicago-based writer specializing in the life sciences, with occasional forays into physics, chemistry and horticulture. She is the midwest correspondent for Science magazine, a regular contributor to The Sunday Times of London and Genetic Engineering News and for many years wrote for Mosaic, the magazine of the National Science Foundation. She started her writing career while doing public relations work for the Rockefeller University, Cornell University, and the University of California, San Francisco, and became a full time freelancer nine years ago. Moffat is a member of the National Association of Science Writers and the American Society of Journalists and Authors. She is married to a scientist, has a 12-year-old son, and, in her free time, practices applied biology in the back garden.