Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

JOEL F. HANDLER is professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, he was the Vilas research professor and the George A. Wiley professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and served on the senior research staff at the university's Institute for Research on Poverty. His primary research interests are in the areas of poverty law and administration, social welfare programs, race, social movements, and law reform activities. He has published a dozen books and numerous articles on these subjects. He has served on several committees of the National Research Council and chaired the Panel on Public Policies Contributing to the Deinstitutionalization of Children and Youth and the Panel on Political Participation and Administration of Justice of the Committee on the Status of Black Americans. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and served as president of the Law and Society Association. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School.

GORDON L. BERLIN is senior vice president at the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, an intermediary organization that tests new approaches to social welfare problems. He is also executive director of a Canadian nonprofit organization formed at the request of the Canadian government to undertake a two-province test of a wage subsidy program for single parents receiving public assistance. Previously, he was executive deputy administrator



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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff JOEL F. HANDLER is professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, he was the Vilas research professor and the George A. Wiley professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and served on the senior research staff at the university's Institute for Research on Poverty. His primary research interests are in the areas of poverty law and administration, social welfare programs, race, social movements, and law reform activities. He has published a dozen books and numerous articles on these subjects. He has served on several committees of the National Research Council and chaired the Panel on Public Policies Contributing to the Deinstitutionalization of Children and Youth and the Panel on Political Participation and Administration of Justice of the Committee on the Status of Black Americans. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and served as president of the Law and Society Association. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School. GORDON L. BERLIN is senior vice president at the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, an intermediary organization that tests new approaches to social welfare problems. He is also executive director of a Canadian nonprofit organization formed at the request of the Canadian government to undertake a two-province test of a wage subsidy program for single parents receiving public assistance. Previously, he was executive deputy administrator

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings for management, budget, and policy of the Human Resources Administration, New York City; program officer and deputy director at the Ford Foundation's urban poverty program; and a program analyst and project officer in the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration. Mr. Berlin is the author of numerous publications on youth, education, employment, and social welfare issues, including, Toward a More Perfect Union (with Andrew Sum), a report on basic skills, families, and the nation's economic future. THOMAS D. COOK is professor of sociology, psychology, education, and public policy at Northwestern University, where he is also a faculty research associate at the Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research. His research and teaching interests include urban policy, evaluation, and research methods. His books include ''Sesame Street" Revisited (1975, with others); Quasi-Experimentation: Design and Analysis Issues for Social Research in Field Settings (1979, with D.T. Campbell); Foundations of Program Evaluation: Twenty-Five Years of Theoretical Progress (1991, with W. Shadish and L. Leviton); and Meta-Analysis for Explanation (1992, with Cooper, Cordray, Hartman, Hedges, Light, Louis, and Mosteller). He received a B.A. degree from Oxford University in German and French and a Ph.D. degree in communication research from Stanford University. ALONZO A. CRIM is a professor at Georgia State University. His research, teaching, and administration interests include elementary school education, high school education, and adult education. Published works include "Preparing Students for Technology: The Atlanta Experiment" (with Boyd D. Odom) in Curriculum Review (March-April, 1987); "Desegregation in the Atlanta Public Schools: A Historical Overview" (with Nancy J. Emmons) in School Desegregation Plans that Work (1984); and "A Community of Believers" in Educating Our Citizens: The Search for Excellence, Center for National Policy, Alternatives for the 1980s—No. 9 (1983). He received a B.A. degree from Roosevelt College, an M.A. degree from the University of Chicago, and an Ed.D. degree from Harvard University. SANFORD M. DORNBUSCH is Reed-Hodgson professor of human biology and professor of sociology and education at Stanford University. Formerly, he was director of the Stanford Center for the Study of Families, Children and Youth, and he is now chair of

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings its advisory board; he also taught at Harvard and the University of Washington. He has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford, and he has served as the elected head of both the academic senate and the advisory board. He is the first sociologist to have served as chair of three different sections of the American Sociological Association—methodology, social psychology, and sociology of education; he is currently the elected president of the Society for Research on Adolescence, the first nonpsychologist to receive that honor. Dornbusch is the author of numerous articles and the author or editor of six books, most recently Feminism, Children, and the New Families (1988). He received a B.A. degree from Syracuse University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of chicago, all in sociology. JOY G. DRYFOOS is a researcher, writer, and lecturer. Previously, she was associated with the Alan Guttmacher Institute as director of research and planning and as a senior fellow. She has received support from the Carnegie Corporation since 1984 for a long-term youth-at-risk project with a focus on the integration of the knowledge base in four separate fields: substance abuse, delinquency, school failure, and teen pregnancy. Dryfoos's summary volume, Adolescents-at-Risk: Prevalence and Prevention (1990), presents strategies for developing more comprehensive programs at the community, state, and federal levels. Her current work focuses on school-based youth and family resource centers. Dryfoos serves on many advisory panels concerned with youth, including the Carnegie Task force on Youth Development and Community Programs, Children's Initiative of the New York State Community Aid Association, and Girls Inc.; she was also recently appointed to the Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Block Grant Advisory Council of New York. She is a member of the Editorial Boards of the American Journal of Public Health and the Journal of Adolescent Health Care. She received a B.A. degree from Antioch College and an M.A. degree in urban sociology from Sarah Lawrence College. ROBERTO M. FERNANDEZ is associate professor of sociology and faculty fellow at the Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research at Northwestern University. Previously, he was an instructor and assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Arizona. Fernandez has published extensively in the areas of race and ethnic relations, formal organizations, and social networks. His current research examines the impact of the

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings relocation of a firm from a central city in the suburbs on the employment chances of black, white, and Hispanic workers. He received a B.A. degree from Harvard College and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Chicago. RICHARD B. FREEMAN is program director of the Program in Labor Studies of the National Bureau of Economic Research, professor of economics at Harvard University, and executive programme director of the Comparative Labour Market Institutions Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics. Previously, he taught at the University of Chicago and Yale University. Dr. Freeman has published over 100 articles dealing with topics in youth labor market problems, higher education, trade unionism, high-skilled labor markets, economic discrimination, social mobility, income distribution and equity in the marketplace. In addition, he has written 12 books, several of which have been translated into Japanese and Spanish. His recent books include Labor Markets in Actions: Essays in Empirical Economics (1989); Immigration, Trade and the Labor Market (1991); Immigration and the Work Force: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas (1992); and Capitalism and Generosity: Nonselfish Behavior in a Selfish Economy (forthcoming). He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard University. JOHN HAGAN is professor of sociology and law and Killam Research Fellow at the University of Toronto. His current research focuses on the causes and consequences of delinquency and crime in the life course and on the professional and personal lives of lawyers. In addition to more than 120 published papers on criminological and sociological topics, he has published seven books, one of which, Structural Criminology (1989), received awards from the Society for the Study of Social Problems and the American Sociological Association. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the American Society of Criminology, a former president of the American Society of Criminology, a research fellow of Statistics Canada, and a fellow of the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Illinois and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Alberta. CHARLES E. IRWIN, JR., is professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Adolescent Medicine at the University of California,

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings San Francisco School of Medicine. He also directs the Interdisciplinary Adolescent Health Training Project at the University of California, San Francisco, and is a member of the Institute for Health Policy Studies. His research has focused on risk-taking behaviors during adolescence and how clinicians can more effectively identify adolescents who are at risk for engaging in health-compromising behaviors. He is the author of several publications on the development of risky behavior during adolescence and the editor of Adolescent Social Behavior and Health (1987). He is the recipient of the Society for Adolescent Medicine's Outstanding Achievement Award in 1985, the National Center for Youth Law/Youth Law Center's annual award recognizing his research in high-risk youth (in 1988) and the ambulatory Pediatric Association's Teaching Award for training physicians in behavioral sciences (in 1990). He received a B.S. degree in biology from Hobart College, a B.M.S. degree from Dartmouth Medical School, a M.D. degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation clinical scholar at the University of California, San Francisco-Stanford. RICHARD JESSOR is a long-time member of the faculty in the Department of Psychology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He currently also serves as director of the Institute of Behavioral Science and directs the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Adolescent Development Among Youth in High-Risk Settings. His areas of research include adolescent and young adult development, the social psychology of problem behavior, and psychosocial aspects of poverty. Jessor has been a consultant to numerous organizations, including the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Health, and Welfare, Canada; and the World Health Organization. He has authored or edited approximately 100 publications, including 6 books. Jessor studied at the College of the City of New York and received a B.A. degree from Yale University, an M.A. degree from Columbia University in 1947, and a Ph.D. degree in clinical psychology from Ohio State University. GLORIA JOHNSON-POWELL is professor of child psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Camille Cosby Center at the Judge Baker Children's Center in Boston. Her research and teaching interests include child psychiatry, mental retardation, pathology of child abuse, human behavior, mental health services to poor and minority group children, Head Start, and the Job Corps.

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings Publications include Black Monday's Children: The Effects of School Desegregation, (1973), The Psycho-Social Development of Minority Group Children (with J. Yamamoto, et al.) (1984), and The Lasting Effects of Child Sexual Abuse (with G.E. Wyatt, ed.) (1990). She received a B.A. degree from Mount Holyoke College and an M.D. degree from Meharry Medical College, Nashville; she completed a residency in psychiatry, a fellowship in child psychiatry, a research fellowship at the Center for Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, and a fellowship in health policy at the RAND/UCLA Health Policy Institute. AARON SHIRLEY is a pediatrician and director of the Jackson-Hinds Comprehensive Health Center in Jackson, Mississippi. His practice and interests include the correlation between health and education services, Head Start, human relations, rural medical practice, and health services for the poor. He received a B.S. degree from Tougaloo College and an M.D. degree from Meharry Medical College; he served a general rotating internship at Hubbard Hospital, Nashville, and a pediatric residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. BARBARA STARFIELD is professor and head of the Division of Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Trained in pediatrics and epidemiology, she now devotes her energies to health services research and its translation into health policy at the national, state, and local levels. Her primary research interests are in primary care measurement, the relationship between the processes and outcomes of health care, quality of care, health status measurement (particularly for adolescents and children), and child health policy. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on several of its committees. She is currently chairing the Subcouncil on Medical Effectiveness and Outcomes of the National Advisory Council to the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and she recently chaired the Council on Research of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Starfield has published widely on the subject of child and youth health status and the impact of the health system on it. She received a B.A. from Swarthmore College, an M.D. from State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, and a M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University. LLOYD STREET is associate professor of human service studies at the College of Human Ecology, Cornell University. His research

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Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings and teaching interests include race and crime, human service delivery, and program planning. Publications that reflect these interests include The Transient Slum (with Phil Brown), Background for Planning (with E. Fruedenberg), and Race, Crime, and Community (in press). He received B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in sociology and a post master's certificate in community organization research from the University of California, Berkeley. R. SHEPARD ZELDIN, who served as study director for the panel, is now research director for the Center for Youth Development of the Academy for Education Development in Washington, D.C. His current research examines adolescent development as it occurs in schools and community-based youth programs. He also collaborates with community leaders and program managers nationwide to strengthen services on the basis of theory and research on youth development. Previously, he worked as an organizational consultant and education researcher and held senior positions in the legislative and executive branches of Virginia state government. He received a B.A. degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. degree in human development and family studies from Cornell University.

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