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C
Biographical Sketches

ANNE C. PETERSEN (panel chair) is vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School as well as professor of adolescent development and pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. Previously she served as dean of the College of Health and Human Development and professor in the department of human development and women's studies at Pennsylvania State University. She is a former president of the Society for Research on Adolescence and a member of the advisory council of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Petersen studies biopsychosocial development in adolescence, developmental psychopathology, gender differences in development, and methods for development and change. She has a Ph.D. in measurement, evaluation, and statistical analysis from the University of Chicago.

J. LAWRENCE ABER is associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Barnard College and director of the Barnard Center for Toddler Development at Columbia University. He has served as a consultant to the National Center on Children in Poverty since its inception. He teaches and has directed numerous research studies concerning the social, emotional, motivational, and behavioral development of high-risk infants, children, and youth. His developmental research has included the design of conceptual models and recommendations for program and policy changes that recognize the relationships between individual development and community, neighborhood, and family environments. He has a Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from Yale University.



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Page 372 C Biographical Sketches ANNE C. PETERSEN (panel chair) is vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School as well as professor of adolescent development and pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. Previously she served as dean of the College of Health and Human Development and professor in the department of human development and women's studies at Pennsylvania State University. She is a former president of the Society for Research on Adolescence and a member of the advisory council of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Petersen studies biopsychosocial development in adolescence, developmental psychopathology, gender differences in development, and methods for development and change. She has a Ph.D. in measurement, evaluation, and statistical analysis from the University of Chicago. J. LAWRENCE ABER is associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Barnard College and director of the Barnard Center for Toddler Development at Columbia University. He has served as a consultant to the National Center on Children in Poverty since its inception. He teaches and has directed numerous research studies concerning the social, emotional, motivational, and behavioral development of high-risk infants, children, and youth. His developmental research has included the design of conceptual models and recommendations for program and policy changes that recognize the relationships between individual development and community, neighborhood, and family environments. He has a Ph.D. in clinical and developmental psychology from Yale University.

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Page 373 ANDREW BILLINGSLEY is professor and chair of the Department of Family and Community Development at the University of Maryland. He has held this position since 1987. Previously he served as president of Morgan State University and vice president for academic affairs at Howard University. He is author of 4 books and more than 200 technical and professional articles, primarily on the social and economic status of African American families in the United States. He is currently completing a book on the role of black churches as an American social institution. He has a Ph.D. in social policy and social research from Brandeis University. JEANNE BROOKS-GUNN is Virginia and Leonard Marx professor in child and parent development and education and director of the Center for the Development and Education of Young Children and Their Parents at Columbia University. She was previously senior research scientist in the Division of Education Policy Research for the Educational Testing Service. She has coedited or authored about a dozen books and numerous research articles on youth and adolescence, focusing on teen parenting, adolescent transitions, and parent-child relationships. She has a Ph.D. in human learning and development from the University of Pennsylvania. ROSEMARY CHALK (study director) is a science policy analyst in the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education in the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. She has previously directed four studies for the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, including the study that produced the two-volume report Responsible Science (1993), a study on integrity and misconduct in science. Before joining the Academy staff in 1987, Ms. Chalk was program head for the Office of Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has consulted and written extensively on a range of science policy issues, including human rights and the civil liberties of scientists, social responsibility in the development and use of science and technology, and whistle-blowing in science. She has a B.A. in political science from the University of Cincinnati. DONALD J. COHEN is Irving B. Harris professor of child psychiatry, pediatrics and psychology and director of the Child Study Center at the Yale University School of Medicine. A child psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, he joined the faculty of the School of Medicine in 1972 and has been the director of the Child Study Center since 1983. His clinical and research activities have focused on the serious neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood, including pervasive developmental disorders (such as autism) and stereotypic and tick disorders (such as Tourette's syndrome). He has published hundreds of articles and monographs. He is codirector of the Yale

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Page 374 Mental Health Clinical Research Center and vice-president (for North America) of the International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Commission on Children. He has an M.D. from the Yale School of Medicine. MICHAEL I. COHEN has been chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center since 1980 and has been a member of the faculty of the same institution since 1972. He is also an attending pediatrician at the Bronx Municipal Hospital and former president and chief executive officer of the Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Dr. Cohen is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a member of the Council on Adolescent Development of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He has an M.D. from Columbia University. JON ROBERT CONTE is associate professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington and editor of The Journal of Interpersonal Violence and Violence Update. His research interests include preventing the sexual victimization of young children, the effects of sexual abuse on children, and studies of the effects of intervention in child sexual abuse. He is a former president of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children and a former member of the criminal and violence research review committee of the National Institute of Mental Health. He has a Ph.D. in social work from the University of Washington. BYRON EGELAND is the Irving B. Harris professor of child psychology for the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1972. Dr. Egeland has directed a comprehensive prospective study on high-risk mothers and the antecedents of child abuse. His research interests include patterns of adaptation to stressful events in childhood, profiles of women at risk for child abuse, and prevention interventions for high-risk parents. He is a member of the board of directors of the National Committee for the Prevention of Child Abuse, a member of the board of directors of the National Archives for Research in Child Abuse and Neglect at Cornell University, and a member of the Board of Directors of Project MELD in Minneapolis. Dr. Egeland has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Iowa. E. MAVIS HETHERINGTON is the James Page professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. She has been a member of the faculty at the University of Virginia since 1970 and is a former chair of the psychology department. Dr. Hetherington has edited 10 books and numerous research articles on the role of family structure and the effects of parental character-

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Page 375 istics on child development. Her research interests include the effects of divorce, single parenting, and stepparenting on children; the role of family systems in child development; and environmental influences on adolescence. She is a former president of the Society for Research in Child Development, former president of the Society for Research in Adolescence, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Child Development. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. SARAH McCUE HORWITZ is associate professor of public health in the Department of Public Health and Epidemiology at the Yale University School of Medicine, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1986. Her research interests include the health and treatment of children born to teenage mothers and methodological issues in research on children. She has a Ph.D. in epidemiology and health services from Yale University and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Yale Institution for Social and Policy Studies. JILL E. KORBIN is associate professor and acting chair in the Department of Anthropology at Case Western Reserve University. She received the 1986 Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association, served as a Society for Research in Child Development congressional science fellow in 1985-1986, and was a scholar-in-residence at the Kempe National Center in 1977-1978. Dr. Korbin has published numerous articles on culture and child maltreatment, including her edited book, Child Abuse and Neglect: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. She has conducted research on women incarcerated for fatal child maltreatment, on child and elder abuse in Ohio, and currently on the impact of neighborhood factors on child maltreatment in Cleveland. She earned a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California at Los Angeles. DOROTHY OTNOW LEWIS is professor of psychiatry at the New York University School of Medicine and clinical professor of psychiatry at the Yale University Child Study Center. She is the recipient of the 1992 Norbert Rieger Award of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for her research paper on the physical consequences of child maltreatment. Her research interests include studies of juvenile violence, delinquency and psychopathology, and the psychophysiological consequences of child maltreatment. She has edited three books and numerous research articles and is a frequent consultant and speaker on the problems of youthful offenders. She has an M.D. from the Yale School of Medicine. RODERICK J.A. LITTLE is professor and chair of the Department of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan. He was formerly professor and vice-chair of the department of biomathematics in the School of Medicine

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Page 376 at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include the improvement of survey accuracy and the improvement of methodology and software for mental health research. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from London University, England. MURRAY STRAUS is a professor of sociology and founder and codirector of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire. He has also taught at the universities of Minnesota, Cornell, Wisconsin, Washington State, York (England), Bombay (India), and the University of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). He has been elected to a number of offices in scientific societies, including president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, president of the Eastern Sociological Society, president of the National Council on Family Relations, and member of the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received the Ernest W. Burgess Award of the National Council of Family Relations for outstanding research on the family and an American Sociological Association award for contributions to undergraduate teaching. Dr. Straus is author or coauthor of over 150 articles on the family, research methods, and South Asia; and 15 books on physical violence in American families, violence and crime in intimate relationships, and social stress in the United States. He is currently writing a book on the use of corporal punishment in American families. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. CATHY SPATZ WIDOM is professor of criminal justice and psychology and director of the Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center at the State University of New York at Albany. She is a former faculty member in psychology and social relations at Harvard University and in criminal justice and psychology at Indiana University. She received the 1989 American Association for the Advancement of Science Behavioral Science Research Prize and was elected a fellow of the American Psychological Association in 1993. She has published extensively on topics that include child abuse and neglect, juvenile delinquency, female criminality, and violence. Her recent research interests focus on the intergenerational transmission of violence and the long-term consequences of early childhood abuse and neglect. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from Brandeis University. GAIL E. WYATT is a licensed clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1974. She has been a National Institute of Mental Health research scientist since 1982, examining a range of women's consensual and nonconsensual sexual experiences and the effects on psychological functioning and sexual decision making. Dr. Wyatt is an internationally recognized sex educator,

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Page 377 certified sex therapist, and lecturer. She is also a diplomate and founding clinical fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Sexologists and a fellow of the American Psychological Association. She is the principal investigator of research projects examining AIDS-related sexual decision making in Jamaica among men and women and African American, Latina, and white women in Los Angeles County. Dr. Wyatt's numerous scientific publications and books involve ethnic and cultural considerations and methodological issues in research and the effects of sexual victimization on women. Her current research interests include cultural factors that influence understanding of human sexuality and decision making. She has a Ph.D. in developmental studies in education from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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