C
Biographical Sketches

CHARLES O'BRIEN is chief of psychiatry at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, professor and vice chairman of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of the University of Pennsylvania Addiction Research Center. He is board certified in both neurology and psychiatry, and his research interests include the psychopharmacology of addiction and the development of new behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addiction, including alcoholism using controlled clinical trials. Involved in delivering general psychiatric and substance abuse treatment, he also directs training for medical students, fellows, and residents. He has authored more than 260 publications in the area of addictive disorders and biological psychiatry. In 1988 he received the first annual Wikler award for excellence in drug abuse research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the MERIT award in 1992, and a Pacesetter research award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in 1993. In 1991 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. He has B.S., M.D., and Ph.D. degrees from Tulane University.

TERRY BLUM is professor of organizational behavior in the School of Management, Ivan Allen College of Management, Policy and International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, where she has been a member since 1986. She received a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University in 1982, and formerly was adjunct assistant professor of sociology and biostatistics at Tulane University. She served 4 years as a member of the Alcohol



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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force C Biographical Sketches CHARLES O'BRIEN is chief of psychiatry at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, professor and vice chairman of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of the University of Pennsylvania Addiction Research Center. He is board certified in both neurology and psychiatry, and his research interests include the psychopharmacology of addiction and the development of new behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addiction, including alcoholism using controlled clinical trials. Involved in delivering general psychiatric and substance abuse treatment, he also directs training for medical students, fellows, and residents. He has authored more than 260 publications in the area of addictive disorders and biological psychiatry. In 1988 he received the first annual Wikler award for excellence in drug abuse research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the MERIT award in 1992, and a Pacesetter research award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in 1993. In 1991 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. He has B.S., M.D., and Ph.D. degrees from Tulane University. TERRY BLUM is professor of organizational behavior in the School of Management, Ivan Allen College of Management, Policy and International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, where she has been a member since 1986. She received a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University in 1982, and formerly was adjunct assistant professor of sociology and biostatistics at Tulane University. She served 4 years as a member of the Alcohol

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force Psychosocial Review Committee of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, was editor of the Organizations and Occupations Newsletter of the American Sociological Association, and served a 3-year term on the editorial board of Social Forces. Her current research is focused on the dynamics of referral patterns within employee assistance programs, the epidemiology of depression in the workplace, and the genesis and maintenance of human resource practices to deal with social problem issues. ROBERT M. BRAY is a senior research psychologist at Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Previously he was at the University of Kentucky. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in psychology from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, and the American Public Health Association. His recent work has focused on substance use epidemiology and related problems in civilian and military populations, including those in the work force. He has directed the 1982, 1985, 1988, and 1992 Worldwide Surveys of Substance Abuse and Health Behaviors Among Military Personnel and has been coordinator of analytic reports for the 1988 and 1990 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse. He is currently directing the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area Drug Study, a 4-year comprehensive project of the prevalence, correlates, and consequences of drug abuse in household and nonhousehold populations (including people who are homeless, institutionalized, adult offenders, juvenile offenders, clients entering treatment programs, and new mothers). JAMES H. DWYER is associate professor of preventive medicine with joint appointments in the Atherosclerosis Research Institute and the Institute for Prevention Research at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Pepperdine University and a Ph.D. in psychology (statistics) from the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has been a visiting scientist at the University of Bern (Switzerland) and the Institute for Epidemiology (Berlin). The major focus of his substantive research is the relation between diet and atherosclerosis, but he serves as a coinvestigator and consultant on large community trials aimed at the prevention of drug abuse. He is the principal investigator on several National Institute of Health and state-supported research grants. In addition to numerous articles, he is the author of Statistical Models for the Social and Behavioral Sciences and one of the editors of Statistical Models for Longitudinal Studies of Health. BRYAN S. FINKLE is research professor of pharmacology-toxicology in the College of Pharmacy and the Department of Pathology in the College of

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force Medicine, University of Utah Health Sciences Centers. He is also a consultant in medico-legal toxicology and preclinical new drug development. He has a Ph.D. from the School of Medicine, University of Utah. From 1973 to 1983, he was director of the Center for Human Toxicology at the University of Utah and from 1983 to 1989 was director of the Department of Pharmacological Sciences at Genentech Inc. He has been a consultant to the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other government and private agencies involved with the toxicology of drug abuse. He is past president of the International Association of Forensic Toxicologists and of the Forensic Sciences Foundation, past vice-president of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and a member of several state, national, and international organizations of forensic scientists and toxicologists. He has also served on committees of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. He is the recipient of the Stas Medal, awarded by the German Society of Toxicology and Chemistry, and the Rolla Harger Award, the highest honor given by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences Toxicology Section. MARIAN W. FISCHMAN is professor of behavioral biology in the Department of Psychiatry and codirector of the Division on Substance Abuse at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. She is also a research scientist and director of the Substance Use Research Center at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. She has a B.A. from Barnard College, an M.S. in psychology from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in biopsychology from the University of Chicago. Her research has focused on the determinants and consequences of substance use and misuse and the implications of drug use for workplace performance, with special emphasis on stimulant drugs, alcohol, and marijuana. With her colleagues, she has developed important new approaches to evaluating, understanding, and treating the effects of drugs of abuse. She has served on a number of drug abuse advisory boards, including the Board of Scientific Counselors of the Addiction Research Center, Advisor to World Health Organization (Division of Mental Health), the Scientific Advisory Panel of the Ciba Foundation, the Scientific Advisory Board of National Families in Action, and as chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the American Council on Drug Education. She is a member of numerous professional organizations and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, and the American College of Neuro-Psychopharmacology. She is the author or coauthor of more than 100 papers covering various aspects of drugs of abuse, including their behavioral and physiological effects, as well as possible treatment approaches, and has lectured extensively, internationally as well as nationally, on these subjects. BRADLEY K. GOOGINS is founder and director of the Boston University

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force Center on Work and Family, a multidisciplinary research organization, formed under the aegis of the School of Management and the Graduate School of Social Work. The center works to bring new solutions and perspectives to family and work life issues. He received B.A. and M.S.W. degrees from Boston College and a Ph.D. in social policy and research from the Heller School, Brandeis University. He is also associate professor at the Graduate School of Social Work at Boston University and a recent National Kellogg fellow (1989-1992). His recent research funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute on Drug Abuse has focused on several areas relevant to employee assistance programs including supervisor training, the role of social supports, and assessment practices. He has published extensively on work/family issues, employee assistance programs, and workplace substance abuse. His recent work includes Work/Family Conflicts: Private Lives—Public Responses, Linking the Worlds of Family and Work, Family Dependent Care and Workers' Performance, and Balancing Job and Homelife Study. DANIEL LANIER, JR., is a visiting professor at the Florida State University, School of Social Work, and is also director of EAP HealthCare Institute. He was formerly assistant director of the United Auto Workers International Union-General Motors (UAW-GM) National Human Resource Center. Previously, he was associate director of the employee assistance program for General Motors Corporation. Before joining General Motors, he held a number of executive-level human service management positions as a senior officer in the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps. He received a B.S. from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, an M.S.W. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. He is the immediate past president of the Employee Assistance Professionals Association and was formerly chairman of the Employee Assistance Certification Commission. He is a Certified Employee Assistance Professional. He is also an adjunct profession at Western Michigan University. He has written numerous articles and professional publications, including, as coauthor, a best selling series of handbooks on employee assistance programming. WAYNE E.K. LEHMAN is a research scientist with the Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University and was previously with the Behavioral Research Program at Texas A&M University. He has a B.A. in psychology from Heidelberg College and a Ph.D. in psychology from Texas Christian University. His research centers on substance abuse issues, primarily in the area of drugs in the workplace. His current research program includes development of employee drug use measures and performance issues related to drug use in work settings. He is currently directing a large-scale,

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force multisite project involving employee surveys of substance use and its impact on organizations. He is a member of the American Psychological Society and the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology. RICHARD O. LEMPERT is the Francis A. Allen Collegiate professor of law, professor of sociology, and acting chair of the sociology department at the University of Michigan. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, past chair of the National Research Council's Committee on Law and Justice, and a former editor of the Law and Society Review. He has also served on National Research Council committees and panels on tax compliance, on statistical evidence and the courts, and on DNA technology in forensic science. His research interests include informal justice, the jury system, the law of evidence, and uses of scientific evidence. He is the author (with Stephen Saltzburg) of A Modern Approach to Evidence and (with Joseph Sanders) of An Invitation to Law and Social Science. COLLINS E. LEWIS is associate professor of psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine. He received a B.A. in biological sciences from Rutgers University and an M.D. from Harvard University Medical School. He also received an M.P.H. from the Harvard University School of Public Health. His interests center on the effect of comorbidity on problem drinking with particular emphasis on antisocial personality. He is the author of numerous publications and several invited book chapters. He has served on the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism initial review group and is currently on the National Institute of Mental Health's special projects review committee. He is currently on the editorial board of The Journal of Employee Assistance Program Research and is a member of the Research Society on Alcoholism and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism. ELAINE MCGARRAUGH is research associate for the Committee on the Impact of Needle Exchange and Bleach Distribution Programs, National Research Council, and production editor with the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council. For the past 9 years she has worked on numerous National Research Council and Institute of Medicine studies that looked at the treatment and prevention of alcohol and illicit drugs. Prior to joining the National Research Council, she was the educational director at an adolescent inpatient drug rehabilitation center. She has a B.S. from McMurry College. JEFFREY A. MIRON is professor of economics at Boston University and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College in 1979 and a Ph.D.

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984. From 1984 to 1990, he served on the faculties of the University of Michigan and the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served as consultant to the Federal Reserve Board on several occasions. In 1988 he was awarded an Olin Fellowship from the National Bureau of Economics, and in 1989 he received a Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship. He has published extensively in professional journals on such topics as the theory and practice of monetary policy, the quality of government statistics, the seasonal fluctuations in aggregate activity, the seasonality of births, and the economics of illegal drugs. KEVIN R. MURPHY is a professor of psychology at Colorado State University. He has a B.A. in psychology from Siena College, an M.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University, both in industrial/organization psychology. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the American Psychological Society and serves as associate editor for the Journal of Applied Psychology. He is a member of the editorial boards of Human Performance, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and International Journal of Selection and Assessment. He has published extensively in a number of areas, including performance appraisal, psychological measurement, drug testing, and integrity testing. His most recent book, Honesty in the Workplace, examines a variety of techniques for reducing counterproductive behavior in the workplace, including programs aimed at reducing substance abuse. MICHAEL D. NEWCOMB is professor of counseling psychology and chairperson of the Division of Counseling and Educational Psychology at the University of Southern California. He is also a research psychologist and codirector of the Substance Abuse Research Center in the psychology department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from UCLA and is a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of California. He is a fellow in several divisions of the American Psychological Association and also fellow in the American Psychological Society. He is principal investigator on several grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He has published over 100 papers and book chapters and is the author of Consequences of Adolescent Drug Use (with Bentler), Drug Use in the Workplace, and Sexual Abuse and Consensual Sex: Women's Developmental Patterns and Outcomes (with Wyatt and Riederlie). He has served on several journal editorial boards, including the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Archives of Sexual Behavior, Journal of Addictive Diseases, and Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse. His research interests include the etiology and consequences of adolescent drug

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force abuse; structural equation modeling, methodology, and multivariate analysis; human sexuality; health psychology; attitudes and affect related to nuclear war; and cohabitation, marriage, and divorce. He has served on several national review and advisory committees for such groups as the National Research Council, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health, the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention, and various research centers. JACQUES NORMAND is a study director at the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. He is currently directing a study on the impact of needle exchange and bleach distribution programs on the incidence of HIV and drug use behavior among intravenous drug users. Prior to joining the National Research Council in 1991, he held research psychologist positions in both the private and public sectors. In that capacity, he was responsible for the development, validation, and implementation of various personnel selection and organizational intervention programs. He has published in various professional research journals and has spoken at numerous professional meetings on personnel evaluation issues. He has also served as a consultant to the National Institute on Drug Abuse and acts as an ad hoc reviewer of applied drug-use research manuscripts for various professional journals. He has also served as a technical advisor on the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Technical Review Meeting on Research Methods in Workplace Settings and recently completed a 4-year term as a full member of the Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Prevention Research Grant Review Committee at the National Institutes of Health. He has a B.A. from McGill University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Illinois Institute of Technology. PATRICK M. O'MALLEY is research scientist at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He has a B.S. degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in psychology and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan. Since 1975, he has been a codirector of the Monitoring the Future project, an ongoing study of the lifestyles and values of American youth. This study, which involves annual national surveys of secondary school students in grades 8, 10, and 12 and young adults through age 35, provides the nation with annual reports on trends in the use of psychoactive drugs, including alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs. Since 1987 he has been a member of the Drug Abuse Epidemiology and Prevention Research Review Committee for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He has published extensively on the use and abuse of psychoactive drugs and is senior author of a major report on the role of minimum drinking age laws in alcohol use by young Americans.

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Under the Influence? Drugs and the American Work Force ADRIAN M. OSTFELD is the Anna M.R. Lauder professor of epidemiology and public health and of medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and a senior member of the Institute of Medicine. He is a former member of the National Advisory Council on Aging and the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Most of his research has been concerned with the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease and of aging. He is author or coauthor of 10 books and 230 papers and book chapters on these subjects, and editor emeritus of the American Journal of Epidemiology, as well as an editorial board member or member emeritus of seven journals. ANDREW M. WEISS is professor of economics at Boston University. He received a B.A. from Williams College and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. He was a research economist with Bell Laboratories and Bell Communications Research, and a visiting professor at Tel Aviv University in 1991 and 1992. His research interests center on the role of imperfect information in economic and social processes. His research has recently focused on integrating recent developments in neuropsychology with modern techniques of economic analysis to gain a better understanding of individual responses to addictive substances. He has written numerous articles in professional journals and has lectured at major universities and professional associations in the United States, Japan, Great Britain, Israel, Germany, Czechoslovakia, France, Italy, Canada, Argentina, and Uruguay. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society. His recent book, Efficiency Wages, was published jointly in the United States and Great Britain. M. DONALD WHORTON is vice president of ENSR Consulting and Engineering, the environmental consulting division of American NuKEM, an integrated environmental services company in Alameda, California. He is a physical epidemiologist specializing in occupation and environmental health issues. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served or is serving on other Institute of Medicine and National Research Council committees. He is a fellow of the American College of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, chairman of its Occupational Medical Practices Committee, and a fellow of the American Public Health Association.

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