Page 275

binding and mechanism of enzymes which alter the goemetry and topology of DNA. He has been a visiting professor at Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan and at the University of Geneva in Switzerland. He is a member of the Program in Mathematics and Molecular Biology at the University of California at Berkeley and has been a member of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, Berkeley and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Dr. Sumners received the B.Sc. degree in physics from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, in 1963 and the Ph.D. in mathematics (specializing in topology) from the University of Cambridge in 1967, where he was a Marshall Scholar. Dr. Sumners is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Knot Theory and Its Ramifications, Nonlinear World, and the Journal of Computational Biology.

Simon Tavaré
Professor of Mathematics and Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, California

Dr. Tavaré's scientific interests are in the application of probability and statistics to problems in population genetics, human genetics, and molecular evolution. He has held positions at the University of Utah and Colorado State University. Dr. Tavaré is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He received a Ph.D. in probability and statistics in 1979 from the University of Sheffield in England.

Michael S. Waterman
Professor of Mathematics and Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, California

Dr. Waterman's main scientific interests are in the application of mathematics, statistics, and computer science to molecular sequence data. He holds a USC Associates Endowed Chair and is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Waterman has held



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement