Appendix B
Biographical Sketches

GEORGE T. DUNCAN is professor of statistics in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management and in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. He previously held an academic appointment at the University of California, Davis, and was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines in 1965–1967, teaching at Mindanao State University. His current research work centers on the decision processes of conflict resolution as they apply to privacy and information issues. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has been editor of the Theory and Methods Section of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota, all in statistics.

JAMES T. BONNEN is professor of agricultural economics at Michigan State University. His current research interests include information systems theory, the design and management of statistically based policy decision systems, and agricultural research policy. Bonnen has served as chair of the National Research Council Panel on Statistics for Rural Development Policy (1979–1980), director of the President's Reorganization Project for the Federal Statistical System (1978–1980), president of the American Agricultural Economics Association (1975), member of the President's National



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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics Appendix B Biographical Sketches GEORGE T. DUNCAN is professor of statistics in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management and in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. He previously held an academic appointment at the University of California, Davis, and was a Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines in 1965–1967, teaching at Mindanao State University. His current research work centers on the decision processes of conflict resolution as they apply to privacy and information issues. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has been editor of the Theory and Methods Section of the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota, all in statistics. JAMES T. BONNEN is professor of agricultural economics at Michigan State University. His current research interests include information systems theory, the design and management of statistically based policy decision systems, and agricultural research policy. Bonnen has served as chair of the National Research Council Panel on Statistics for Rural Development Policy (1979–1980), director of the President's Reorganization Project for the Federal Statistical System (1978–1980), president of the American Agricultural Economics Association (1975), member of the President's National

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics Advisory Commission on Poverty, and as senior staff economist with the President's Council of Economic Advisers (1963–1965). In 1981 he received the American Statistical Association's Washington Statistical Society's Julius Shiskin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Economic Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association, the American Statistical Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a B.A. degree from Texas A&M University, an M.A. degree from Duke University, and a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University, all in economics. JOE S. CECIL is a project director at the Federal Judicial Center. He is the author of numerous publications concerning legal standards affecting exchange of information for research purposes. Other areas of research interest include the use of scientific and technical evidence in litigation, variations in procedures employed by federal courts of appeals, and management of mass tort litigation. He received a J.D. degree from Northwestern University School of Law and a Ph.D. degree in psychology and evaluation research from Northwestern University. MICHELE L. CONRAD is a senior project assistant with the Committee on National Statistics. Previously she was the senior project assistant for the Panel to Review Evaluation Studies of Bilingual Education, and she is currently working with the Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Pittsburgh. MARTIN HEIDENHAIN DAVID is professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research has explored a variety of problems relating to taxation and transfer programs, involving extensive work in collecting, analyzing, and managing complex data and the design of information systems to support such data. His books include two that report on major data collection efforts, Income and Welfare in the United States (McGraw-Hill, 1962) and Linkage and Retrieval of Microeconomic Data (Lexington Books, 1974). He has served on the National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Statistics for Family Assistance and on the Panel on Research Strategies in the Behavioral and Social Sciences on Environmental Problems and Policies. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He serves as adviser to the Statistics of Income Division of the Internal Revenue Service; a member of the Committee on National Statistics of the NRC; and

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics a member of the Advisory Board of the German Socio-economic Panel Study, which is conducted by the Deutsches Institut fur Wirtschafts-forschung. He received an A.B. degree from Swarthmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. VIRGINIA A. DE WOLF, who served as the panel study director, is currently a mathematical statistician at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Previously she worked at the national Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the U.S. General Accounting Office, and the University of Washington (Seattle). She received a B.A. degree in mathematics from the College of New Rochelle, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Washington (Seattle) in educational psychology with emphases in statistics, measurement, and research design. RUTH R. FADEN is professor of health policy and management and director of the Program in Law, Ethics, and Health in the School of Hygiene and Public Health of the Johns Hopkins University, and she is also a senior research scholar at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. She serves as a consultant to numerous government and private agencies and is the author of books and journal articles on health policy, biomedical ethics, and health behavior. She also works on procedure-based rationing in medical care. She holds an M.A. degree in humanities from the University of Chicago, a M.P.H. degree from the University of California-Berkeley, and a Ph.D. degree in attitudes and behavior from the University of California, Berkeley. DAVID H. FLAHERTY is a professor of history and law at the University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. He has had a long involvement with issues of personal privacy and information policy and has written several books on the issues of privacy and confidentiality, including Privacy and Government Data Banks: An International Perspective (Mansell, 1979) and Protecting Privacy in Surveillance Societies: The Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, France, Canada, and the United States (University of North Carolina Press, 1989). He has testified before many U.S. and Canadian legislative committees on computer matching, the privacy implications of computer crime, and bills on freedom of information and protection of individual privacy. He also participated in the first oversight hearings on the Privacy Act of 1974, held by the House Subcommittee on Government Information of

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics the U.S. Congress. In 1992–1993 Flaherty held appointments as a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a Canada-U.S. Fulbright fellow, a visiting scholar at Georgetown National Law Center, and a fellow of the Kennedy Institute for Ethics at Georgetown University. He received a B.A. degree from McGill University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. THOMAS B. JABINE is an independent statistical consultant who specializes in sampling, survey research methods, and statistical policy. He was formerly a statistical policy expert for the Energy Information Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy, chief mathematical statistician for the Social Security Administration, and chief of the Statistical Research Division of the Bureau of the Census. He is a member of the International Statistical Institute and a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and he served as president of the Washington Statistical Society. He is the author of several articles on the confidentiality and data access policies and practices of federal statistical agencies and served as chair of the American Statistical Association Committee on Privacy and Confidentiality. With Richard P. Claude, he edited Statistics and Human Rights: Getting the Record Straight (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992). He has a B.S. degree in mathematics and an M.S. degree in economics and science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. F. THOMAS JUSTER is a research scientist at the Survey Research Center and professor of economics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research includes the design of economic and social accounting systems, the analysis of saving and wealth accumulation patterns among U.S. households, the analysis of time allocation among households, and the development of measures of economic well-being. He has served on a number of National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on National Statistics, and he has chaired the NRC Committee on the Supply and Demand for Mathematics and Science Teachers and the American Economic Association Committee on the Quality of Economic Data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the National Association of Business Economists. He received a B.S. degree in education from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from Columbia University.

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics GARY T. MARX is professor and chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder and director of the Center for the Social Study of Information Technology. Previously he taught at the University of California, Berkeley, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author most recently of Undercover: Police Surveillance in America (University of California Press, 1988) and of academic and popular articles on the social implications of information technology. His work has been translated into many languages, including Japanese and Chinese. He has worked on privacy and technology issues for the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment, the U.S. General Accounting Office, Senate and House Subcommittees, state and local governments, the Canadian House of Commons, and the Council of Europe. His current work focuses on technologies for extracting personal information and research on cross-border forms of social control. He received a Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. WILLIAM M. MASON is professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has held academic appointments at the University of Michigan, Duke University, and the University of Chicago. His research has been in the areas of research design, multilevel models, social demography, and political sociology; he is currently studying infant mortality in China. He has been a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellow and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He received a B.A. degree from Reed College and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. WLODZIMIERZ OKRASA is a staff associate at the Social Science Research Council. He is currently developing a social science research laboratory for collaborative, comparative research in and about Eastern and Central Europe. He specializes in the methodology of social investigation, social statistics, and microeconomics. He has held appointments as an American Statistical Association research fellow and as a fellow of the British Academy and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung. Previously he served as head of a research unit at the Institute of Economic Science at the Polish Academy of Sciences and as adviser to the president of the Polish Central Statistical Office. He has written and edited several books, including Social Welfare in Britain and Poland, with Julian Le Grand (London School of Economics, 1988). He received a Ph.D. degree in 1977 from the University of Warsaw.

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics ROBERT W. PEARSON is Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Barnard College. He previously served as Assistant Survey Director at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago and as staff associate at the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). While at SSRC, he worked with the panel and with committees on cognition and survey research, the comparative evaluation of longitudinal surveys, and research on the urban underclass. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and a Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Chicago. DONALD B. RUBIN is professor of statistics and chair of the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. Previously he was professor of statistics and of education at the University of Chicago and chair of the Statistics Research Group at the Educational Testing Service. His research has dealt with causal inference in experimental and observational studies, missing data and nonresponse in surveys, and applied Bayesian statistics, including computational methods. He has been coordinating and applications editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association and is a past member of the National Research Council Committee on National Statistics. He is a fellow of a number of professional associations, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Statistical Association, and the International Statistics Institute. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and an M.S. degree in computer science and a Ph.D. degree in statistics, both from Harvard University. ELEANOR SINGER is a senior research scholar at the Center for the Social Sciences at Columbia University. Her primary areas of work include public opinion and survey methods research, and she has conducted several studies of the impact of informed consent procedures and confidentiality assurances on survey participation rates and response quality. She is a past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and a former editor of Public Opinion Quarterly. With Stanley Presser, she edited Survey Research Methods: A Reader (University of Chicago Press, 1989). She received a B.A. degree from Queens College and a Ph.D. degree from Columbia University.

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Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics DAVID L. SZANTON is Executive Director of International and Area Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is an anthropologist with research interests in contemporary Southeast Asia. From 1975 to 1991 he organized and staffed numerous area and research planning committees at the Social Science Research Council in New York. He received a B.A. degree from Harvard College and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. W.H. WILLIAMS is professor of mathematics and statistics at Hunter College in New York City. His current research interests are in the statistics of employment discrimination and the influence of language factors in mathematics learning. Previously he was in the Mathematics and Statistics Research Center at Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey, and he later headed a division of A.T.&T. responsible for econometric analysis of corporate financial structures. He has also been Executive Vice-President of Louis Harris and Associates, the public polling firm, and president of Strategic Comaps, a firm that develops software for the credit and collections industry. He has had visiting appointments at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Michigan, and the Census Bureau. He has published more than 50 papers and three books on statistical methods applicable to economic and business problems. He was educated at McMaster and Iowa State Universities.