About the Authors

SANDRA S. BATIE (Chair) is the Elton R. Smith Professor of Food and Agricultural Policy at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Oregon State University. Her research includes work in natural resource and agricultural policy, soil conservation, water quality, research methodology, and rural development. She was professor of agricultural economics at Virginia Polytechnic and State University during most of the preparation of this report.

J. WENDELL GILLIAM is a professor of soil science at North Carolina State University. He earned his Ph.D. from Mississippi State University. His research work includes studies of the contribution of fertilizers to pollution, effect of large-scale agricultural development on water resources, nonpoint source pollution, pollutant removal effectiveness and the hydraulics of wetland filter areas, effect of erosion on soil productivity, the influence of riparian vegetation on water quality, and the impact of land drainage on estuarine habitat.

PETER MARK GROFFMAN is an associate scientist at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York. His Ph.D. in ecology he earned from the University of Georgia. His research interests include terrestrial microbial ecology, dynamics of microbial processes at the landscape level, and transformation of environmental pollutants.

GEORGE R. HALLBERG is chief of environmental geology for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. He earned his Ph.D. in geology



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 495
Soil and Water Quality: An Agenda for Agriculture About the Authors SANDRA S. BATIE (Chair) is the Elton R. Smith Professor of Food and Agricultural Policy at Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Oregon State University. Her research includes work in natural resource and agricultural policy, soil conservation, water quality, research methodology, and rural development. She was professor of agricultural economics at Virginia Polytechnic and State University during most of the preparation of this report. J. WENDELL GILLIAM is a professor of soil science at North Carolina State University. He earned his Ph.D. from Mississippi State University. His research work includes studies of the contribution of fertilizers to pollution, effect of large-scale agricultural development on water resources, nonpoint source pollution, pollutant removal effectiveness and the hydraulics of wetland filter areas, effect of erosion on soil productivity, the influence of riparian vegetation on water quality, and the impact of land drainage on estuarine habitat. PETER MARK GROFFMAN is an associate scientist at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York. His Ph.D. in ecology he earned from the University of Georgia. His research interests include terrestrial microbial ecology, dynamics of microbial processes at the landscape level, and transformation of environmental pollutants. GEORGE R. HALLBERG is chief of environmental geology for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. He earned his Ph.D. in geology

OCR for page 495
Soil and Water Quality: An Agenda for Agriculture from the University of Iowa. He has been actively involved in research of agricultural and nonpoint source pollution, soil genesis, hydrogeology, and groundwater quality. He directs a variety of environmental programs related to agriculture including the Big Spring Basin Demonstration Project and the Model Farms Demonstration Project. NEIL D. HAMILTON is the Ellis and Nelle Levitt Distinguished Professor of Law, and the director of the Agricultural Law Center at Drake University Law School. He earned his B.S. from Iowa State University and his J.D. from the University of Iowa College of Law. He has been involved in research covering the legal aspects of agricultural finance, land tenure and land use, property rights and conservation and environmental law. His area of primary interest is agricultural law and agricultural law as it applies to agricultural and environmental policy and land use. WILLIAM E. LARSON received his Ph.D. in 1949 from Iowa State University. Now retired, he was the head of the Department of Soil Sciences at the University of Minnesota. During his career he was involved in research of soil structure and mechanics, water infiltration, nutrient interrelations in plants, crop response to soil moisture levels and soil temperature, tillage requirements of crops, utilization of sewage wastes on land, and effects of erosion on productivity and fertility. LINDA K. LEE is a visiting associate professor teaching agricultural economics at the University of Connecticut. Her Ph.D. is in economics from Iowa State University. Research areas in which she has worked include natural resources and environmental economics, agricultural impacts on ground- and surface water, soil conservation, and land use. PETER J. NOWAK is an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. in rural sociology from the University of Minnesota. His research work involves the application of sociological models to agricultural problems, transfer of technology to the rural community, and the organizational and informational obstacles to adoption of conservation practices. KENNETH G. RENARD is a hydraulic engineer at the Southwestern Watershed Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Tucson, Arizona. His Ph.D. is in hydrology from the University of Arizona. Focal points of his research have been watershed hydrology relating land practices to water yields and peak

OCR for page 495
Soil and Water Quality: An Agenda for Agriculture rates of discharge, and sediment transport phenomenon in ephemeral stream beds specifically as these phenomena relate to hydraulic engineering. RICHARD E. ROMINGER was part owner and operator of A. H. Rominger and Sons, a family farm in Winters, California prior to being sworn in as Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, on May 12, 1993. He received his B.S. in plant science from the University of California at Davis. From 1977 to 1982 he was Director of the California Department of Food and Agriculture and has been on the board of American Farmland Trust since 1986. B. A. STEWART is laboratory director and research soil scientist at the Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bushland, Texas. He received his Ph.D. in soils from Colorado State University. Research in which he has been involved includes soil fertility, nitrogen management nutrient cycling, effects of agricultural practices on environment, soil and water management, water use efficiency, and erosion control. His work in soil chemistry, nitrogen management, and water management has been of primary importance. KENNETH K. TANJI is a professor of hydrologic science in the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis. He previously served as chair of the Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, director of the Kearney Foundation of Soil Science, assistant director of the agricultural experiment station, director of the University of California salinity/drainage task force, and coordinator of the USDA water quality program at the University of California. He earned his M.S. in soil science from the University of California. He teaches courses in chemical hydrology and modeling. His research program includes the chemistry of salt-affected soils and waters, salinity control and management, trace element chemistry, and hydrochemical modeling. JAN VAN SCHILFGAARDE is associate deputy administrator for natural resources and systems of the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. His Ph.D. in agricultural engineering and soil physics was earned from Iowa State University. His research has focused primarily on management of drainage water in crop production. He directs national research programs including soil management and erosion, water quality and management, and watershed engineering.

OCR for page 495
Soil and Water Quality: An Agenda for Agriculture He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1989. R. J. WAGENET is Professor and Chair of the Department of Soil, Crop, and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University. He received his Ph.D. in soil science from the University of California at Davis. His areas of research work include simulation modeling of soil water and solutes, description of transient nitrogen and pesticide fluxes under field conditions, and the utilization and improvement of salt-affected soils and saline soils. DOUGLAS L. YOUNG is a professor and agricultural economist at Washington State University. He earned his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Oregon State University. Research in which he has been involved includes risk management, economics of soil conservation, economies of size in agriculture, economics of low-input agriculture, agricultural and environmental policy, agricultural development, and farming systems. About the Cartoonist J. N. ''DING" DARLING was an eminent political cartoonist whose career spanned the 1930s through the 1950s. Through cartoons, he brought the idea of conservation to the forefront of public awareness. He became chief of the organization that became the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, founded the National Wildlife Federation, and originated the Federal Duck Stamp Program, which has generated millions of dollars for wildlife refuges. After his death in 1962, the J. N. "Ding" Darling Foundation was created to continue his efforts in conservation education.