APPENDIX A
Biographical Sketches

THOMAS A. SANDS, Chairman, is a partner with Adams and Reese, a law firm in New Orleans. He has extensive background in all aspects of the management of engineering and construction services and water resources programs, with particular emphasis on environmental and regulatory compliance. In addition, he has been involved in environmental litigation concerning compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the Clean Water Act. Prior experience includes field and staff assignments with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He served as the senior official responsible for Corps activities within the North Atlantic region and Lower Mississippi Valley region, where he also served as president of the Mississippi River Commission. Major General Sands received a B.S. in military engineering from the U.S. Military Academy, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Texas A&M University, and a J.D. from George Mason University.

DEWITT (WITT) D. BARLOW III is president and chief executive officer of Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company. Prior positions with the company include chief engineer and vice president, project manager for the International Division, manager for the Middle East Division, and dredging superintendent and field engineer with the North Atlantic Division. Mr. Barlow received a B.A. from Trinity College, a B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from Columbia University, and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago.

JOHN MARK DEAN is a professor of marine science and biology and director of the Center for Environmental Policy, Institute of Public Affairs, at the University of South Carolina. Previously he directed the marine science program and served as coordinator for the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. He has



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Restoring and Protecting Marine Habitat: The Role of Engineering and Technology APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches THOMAS A. SANDS, Chairman, is a partner with Adams and Reese, a law firm in New Orleans. He has extensive background in all aspects of the management of engineering and construction services and water resources programs, with particular emphasis on environmental and regulatory compliance. In addition, he has been involved in environmental litigation concerning compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the Clean Water Act. Prior experience includes field and staff assignments with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He served as the senior official responsible for Corps activities within the North Atlantic region and Lower Mississippi Valley region, where he also served as president of the Mississippi River Commission. Major General Sands received a B.S. in military engineering from the U.S. Military Academy, an M.S. in Civil Engineering from Texas A&M University, and a J.D. from George Mason University. DEWITT (WITT) D. BARLOW III is president and chief executive officer of Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company. Prior positions with the company include chief engineer and vice president, project manager for the International Division, manager for the Middle East Division, and dredging superintendent and field engineer with the North Atlantic Division. Mr. Barlow received a B.A. from Trinity College, a B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from Columbia University, and an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago. JOHN MARK DEAN is a professor of marine science and biology and director of the Center for Environmental Policy, Institute of Public Affairs, at the University of South Carolina. Previously he directed the marine science program and served as coordinator for the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium. He has

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Restoring and Protecting Marine Habitat: The Role of Engineering and Technology conducted research in coastal resource management, ecology of coastal ecosystems, fisheries biology, age and growth of fishes, and integration of science into public policy. Dr. Dean served on the South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council, the National Coastal Resources Advisory Committee, the South Carolina Governor's Natural Resources Education Council, the South Carolina Coastal Council, and the Office of Technology Assessment's Advisory Panel on Coastal Effects of Offshore Energy Systems. He was a member and chairman of the NRC National Science Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship Selection Committee. Dr. Dean received a B.A. in biology from Cornell College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in ecology from Purdue University. OLIVER HOUCK a is professor of law at Tulane Law School. He has more than 20 years' experience as a practicing attorney, researcher, and teacher on environmental, coastal, and water resources law. Previously he served with the National Wildlife Federation as vice president for conservation and education, general counsel, and director of the resources defense division. Earlier he was Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. He currently serves on the boards of the Defenders of Wildlife and the Environmental Defense Fund and was a founder of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana. Dr. Houck received a B.A. in English (cum laude) from Harvard University and a J.D. from Georgetown Law Center. MARY C. LANDIN is a research biologist with the Wetlands Branch, Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. She has more than 28 years' experience as a biologist and researcher for private industry, The U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Army Corps of Engineers, including extensive work in habitat restoration criteria and techniques, mitigation, endangered species, and the beneficial use of dredged materials. She was the lead scientist in the design and management of many restoration and habitat development projects, organized seven international conferences addressing beneficial uses of dredged materials, organized three international conferences on wetlands science, and has written more than 250 technical publications. She chaired an environmental study group for the Lower Mississippi River Delta Development Commission and is a member of the Water Quality 2000 Congress. Dr. Landin received a B.S. in horticulture, an M.S. in wildlife ecology, and a Ph.D. in wildlife management from Mississippi State University. ROBIN (ROY) R. LEWIS III is founder and president of Lewis Environmental Services and senior adjunct scientist with Mote Marine Laboratory. He has more than 15 years' experience in practical creation and restoration of coastal habitats. Previously he was vice president in charge of the environmental division of Proctor and Refern, an engineering consulting firm, and founder and president of Mangrove Systems, an environmental consulting firm. He also served as a professor of biology, chair of the biology department, and scientific advisor at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa. Mr. Lewis served as a member of a scientific advisory committee that advised the U.S. Army Corps of

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Restoring and Protecting Marine Habitat: The Role of Engineering and Technology Engineers on a harbor-deepening project. Mr. Lewis received a B.S. in biology from the University of Florida and an M.A. in zoology from the University of South Florida. He is certified as an Environmental Professional by the National Association of Environmental Professionals and as a Senior Ecologist by the Ecological Society of America. ASHISH J. MEHTA is a professor of coastal and oceanographic engineering and of civil engineering for the University of Florida. He has more than 20 years' experience in research and teaching on fine sediment transport in estuaries and inlets. Prior positions at the University of Florida include associate and assistant professor and research scientist with the Department of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Sedimentation Control and is currently serving as a member of the Marine Board. Dr. Mehta received a B.S. in chemistry and physics from the University of Bombay, a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California, and an M.S. in chemical engineering and mathematics and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Florida. JOHN M. NICHOL is a partner with Moffatt & Nichol, Engineers, where he specializes in coastal, hydraulic, and harbor engineering. Earlier experience includes service as engineer with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, job engineer with Guy F. Atkinson Company for construction of wharfs and freeway bridge buildings, and construction engineer with Huntington Harbour Engineering and Construction for a 900-acre waterfront reclamation project. He chaired the American Society of Civil Engineering National Technical Committee for Coastal Engineering and was national director of the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association. Mr. Nichol received a B.S. in civil engineering from Oregon State College and a diploma in hydraulic and coastal engineering from the Technical University in Delft, The Netherlands. RUTH PATRICK, NAS, is the Francis Boyer Chair of Limnology and Curator of the Limnology Department at the Academy of Natural Sciences. She is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Patrick is an internationally distinguished leader in the field of ecology and limnology with more than 50 years' experience. She has led international expeditions, written extensively, and served on numerous presidential, national, and regional advisory committees. She has also served as chair and member of numerous NAS committees. She has advised Presidents Bush, Reagan, Carter, Nixon, and Johnson on ecological matters pertaining to water. Recently she has been a scientific advisor on the ecological restoration of the Savannah River estuary. Dr. Patrick received a B.S. from Coker College and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. She has received many awards and honorary degrees for the excellence of her work in botany, ecology, and other scientific disciplines. ROBERT E. TURNER is a professor of the Department of Coastal Sciences and Coastal Ecology Institute, Louisiana State University. He has more than

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Restoring and Protecting Marine Habitat: The Role of Engineering and Technology 20 years' international experience in research and teaching on coastal ecology, biological oceanography, environment and management, fisheries, and wetlands. Dr. Turner is chairman of the Intecol Working Group on Wetlands and Natural Resources and the Louisiana Governor's Coastal Restoration Technical Committee. He is co-chair of the EPA Gulf of Mexico technical subcommittee on habitat degradation and is editor-in-chief, Wetlands Ecology and Management. Dr. Turner received a B.A. in zoology from Monmouth College, an M.A. in zoology from Drake University, and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Georgia.