Click for next page ( 128


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 127
Appendix B: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS DAVID A. TIRRELL, Chair, received a B.S. in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was an associate professor of chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University before joining the faculty of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His research interests include synthetic and natural macromolecular chemistry, biological materials, and structures. ILHAN A. AKSAY received a B.Sc. from the University of Washington and an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in materials science engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. After employment with Xerox, the Middle East Technical University, University of California Los Angeles, and the University of Washington, he joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1992. His research interests include processing science of ceramics, thermodynamics and phase equilibra, and interracial reactions and capillary phenomena, and bioinspired processing of materials. ERIC BAER received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Johns Hopkins University. After working at E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company and at the University of Illinois, he 127

OCR for page 127
128 Hierarchical Structures in Biology as a Guide for New Afatenals Technology joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University. His research interests include elucidation of hierarchical structures in natural and synthetic material systems, structure-property relationships, transitional phenomena, and failure and fracture processes. PAUL D. CALVERT received a B.A. and an M.A. from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in materials engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He worked at the University of Sussex and is now a professor at the University of Arizona. His research interests include biomimetic composite materials, polymers, and ceramic processing. JOSEPH CAPPELLO received a B.S. from the University of California, Davis, and a Ph.D. in biological chemistry from the University of Cincinnati. After working at Syntro Corporation, he cofounded Protein Polymers Technologies, Inc. His research interests include the design and biological production of synthetically designed proteins, assembly and structure of fiber- forming proteins, material properties of fibers and films, and the effect of chain structure and folding on materials processing. EDMUND A. DIMARZIO received a B.S. from St. Josephts College, an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in physics from Catholic University. He worked at American Viscose Company and Bell Telephone Laboratories before joining the National Institute of Standards and Technology. His research interests include helix-coil transitions in biological macromolecules, liquid-crystal phase transitions, surface polymers, and the kinetics of crystallization. Dr. Dimarzio is interested in phase transitions in polymers as models for self- assembly.

OCR for page 127
Appendix B 129 EVAN A. EVANS received a B.S. and an M.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in engineering science from the University of California, San Diego. After working at McMaster University and Duke University, he joined the faculty of the University of British Columbia. His research interests include mechanics and thermodynamics of biological cell structure motility, interactions between biological membranes, and the physical chemistry and mechanics of synthetic interfaces. JOHN H. FESSLER received a B.A., a B.Sc., an M.A., and a Ph.D. in chemistry' animal physiology, and physical biochemistry from Oxford University. After working at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School; the Medical Research Council, England; and the California Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include the biosynthesis of connective tissue and molecular developmental biology. JOHN D. HOFFMAN received a B.S. from Franklin and Marshall College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University. After working at General Electric Company, the National Bureau of Standards, the Univerity of Maryland, and Michigan Molecular Institute, he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Hoffman is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His research interests include dielectric phenomena and polymer physics. MICHAEL JAFFE received a B.A. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is presently a research fellow at the Hoechst Celanese Research Division. His research interests include the structure-property relationships of morphology of crystalline high polymers, phase transition behavior of polymers, and materials.

OCR for page 127
130 Hierarchical Structures in Biology as a Guide for New Afatenals Technology GEORGE MAYER received a B.S. from Boston University, an M.Met.E. from the University of Oklahoma, and a Ph.D. in metallurgy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has worked at the Chrysler Corporation, Ilikon Corporation, MIT, Monsanto Company, the Army Research Office, and the Institute for Defense Analyses. He is presently employed by the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Mayer's research interests include mechanical behavior of materials, composite materials, corrosion, nondestructive testing, and materials processing. VAN C. MOW received a B.A.E. and a Ph.D. in mechanics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). He has worked at RPI, New York University, and the Bell Telephone Laboratories. Presently he is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Orthopedic Bioengineering at Columbia University. Dr. Mow is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His research interests include continuum mechanics, classical elasticity and thermoelasticity theory, fluid mechanics, applied mathematics, and biomechanics of synovial joints. STEPHEN A. WAINWRIGHT received a B.S. from Duke University, a B.A. from the University of Cambridge, and a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley. He is presently a professor of zoology at Duke University. His research interests include the structure of locomotor and postural systems of animals and plants from the macromolecular through the organism levels of organization.