Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Authors

Kenneth D. Frederick holds a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a senior fellow at Resources for the Future since 1971. Previously, he was on the faculty of the California Institute of Technology and has held various consulting positions. Dr. Frederick has produced over 50 publications of various types on natural resources policy issues. In recent years his research has concentrated on policy aspects of climate change and various water management issues. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and is also a member of its recently completed Committee on Climate Change and Water Resources Management.

William L. Graf is a geomorphologist specializing in river mechanics, with a secondary interest in public land and water policy. He is professor of geography at Arizona State University. His B.A., M.Sc. (with certificate in water resources management), and Ph.D. in geography are from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published five books, including volumes on the Colorado River, geomorphic systems of North America (edited for the Geological Society of America), dryland river processes, and American public land management. He has published more than 50 scientific papers and an additional 50 research reports and related pieces, mostly focusing on rivers in the western United States. He has served as an expert witness in nearly 20 legal cases and has advised the National Park Service on river management in several western parks. His research has emphasized the analysis of river channel change under the influences of climatic adjustments and human intervention, with his most recent work focusing on the problems of heavy metal and radionuclide transport in river systems. Grants from the National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, Army Corps of Engineers, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of the Interior,



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Sustaining our Water Resources Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Authors Kenneth D. Frederick holds a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a senior fellow at Resources for the Future since 1971. Previously, he was on the faculty of the California Institute of Technology and has held various consulting positions. Dr. Frederick has produced over 50 publications of various types on natural resources policy issues. In recent years his research has concentrated on policy aspects of climate change and various water management issues. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and is also a member of its recently completed Committee on Climate Change and Water Resources Management. William L. Graf is a geomorphologist specializing in river mechanics, with a secondary interest in public land and water policy. He is professor of geography at Arizona State University. His B.A., M.Sc. (with certificate in water resources management), and Ph.D. in geography are from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published five books, including volumes on the Colorado River, geomorphic systems of North America (edited for the Geological Society of America), dryland river processes, and American public land management. He has published more than 50 scientific papers and an additional 50 research reports and related pieces, mostly focusing on rivers in the western United States. He has served as an expert witness in nearly 20 legal cases and has advised the National Park Service on river management in several western parks. His research has emphasized the analysis of river channel change under the influences of climatic adjustments and human intervention, with his most recent work focusing on the problems of heavy metal and radionuclide transport in river systems. Grants from the National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, Army Corps of Engineers, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Department of the Interior,

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Sustaining our Water Resources Department of Justice, and National Geographic Society have supported his work. Dr. Graf has received the G. K. Gilbert Award for Excellence in Geomorphological Research, the 1990 Honors Award from the Association of American Geographers, and the Cole Memorial Award for Arid Region Research from the Geological Society of America. He is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and is also a member of its Glen Canyon Environmental Studies Committee since its inception in 1986. George M. Hornberger obtained his Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University in 1970. He also holds a bachelor's degree (1965) and a master's (1967) degree in civil engineering from Drexel University. He is a professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. He is currently interested in modeling environmental systems with uncertainty, the hydrogeochemical response of small catchments, and the transport of bacteria in porous media. He is also chairman of the Water Science and Technology Board's Committee on Water Resources Research. Walter R. Lynn received a Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1963 and is an expert in environmental systems engineering. He is currently dean of the faculty and professor of civil and environmental engineering at Cornell University. Dr. Lynn has served on several NAE and NRC committees, boards, and panels and was the Water Science and Technology Board's first chairman (1982–1985). He now chairs the NRC's Board on Natural Disasters. Judy L. Meyer is professor of limnology and ecology at the University of Georgia. She received her Ph.D. in ecology from Cornell University. From 1970 to 1972 she was a research associate in the Oceanography Department at the University of Hawaii, and from 1977 to 1983 she was an assistant professor of zoology at the University of Georgia. She is currently professor of zoology at the University of Georgia. Her research interests are in aquatic ecology, terrestrial-aquatic ecology, terrestrial-aquatic ecosystem interactions, dissolved organic carbon in streams, blackwater rivers, and microbial food webs in streams. Dr. Meyer is a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was a member of its former Committee to Review the USGS National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. A. Dan Tarlock received his LL.B. from Stanford University. His professional experience includes private practice, San Francisco, 1966; professor-in-residence at a law firm in Nebraska during the summers of 1977 to 1979; and consultant. He has been a professor of law at Chicago Kent College of Law since 1981. He has authored and coauthored many

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Sustaining our Water Resources publications and articles concerning water resources management and environmental law and policy. Mr. Tarlock served as a member of the NRC Committee on Pest Management and is currently the vice chair of the Water Science and Technology Board. He also serves on the board's Glen Canyon Environmental Studies Committee and was chairman of the Committee on Western Water Management. He also coauthored one of the basic casebooks in water law. Edith Brown Weiss is a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, where she has taught international law, international environmental law, water law, and environmental law. She recently finished a sabbatical at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she served as associate general counsel for international activities. Dr. Weiss has served as chair of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on Research in Global Environmental Change and is former vice president of the American Society of International Law. Dr. Weiss was a member of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1985 to 1988 and has served on several NRC committees. She is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law, International Legal Materials, and Climate Change Digest and was elected to membership in the Council on Foreign Relations, American Law Institute, and the International council on Environmental Law. Her book, In Fairness to Future Generations, received the Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law in 1990. She received her A.B. from Stanford University, LL.B. from Harvard Law School, and her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. She is also a member of the NRC's Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources.