D
Biographical Sketches

Dr. John P. Longwell, Chairman

Dr. Longwell was graduated with a bachelor of science degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and with a doctor of science degree in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His distinguished career in research and engineering with Exxon Research and Engineering Company involved management of several research divisions and culminated with the position of senior scientific advisor for four years. Since 1977 Dr. Longwell has been E.R. Gilliland Professor of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests for the last decade have been primarily related to his activities as Associate Director of the M.I.T. Center for Environmental Health Sciences, with special focus on generation and health effects of combustion products. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society.

Dr. George Apostolakis

Dr. Apostolakis was graduated with a degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University, Athens, Greece, and with a masters degree in engineering science and a doctorate in engineering science and applied mathematics from the California Institute of Technology. He is currently a professor in the Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Department, at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has been a consultant to numerous national and state agencies, as well as to public and private businesses in the area of risk assessment and analysis, particularly as applied to all types of energy production and hazardous waste elimination. Dr. Apostolakis also has participated in the activities and deliberations of countless national and international committees, societies, and conferences. He has published extensively in his field of risk assessment and analysis. He has a particular interest in mathematical methods for risk and reliability



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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions D Biographical Sketches Dr. John P. Longwell, Chairman Dr. Longwell was graduated with a bachelor of science degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and with a doctor of science degree in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His distinguished career in research and engineering with Exxon Research and Engineering Company involved management of several research divisions and culminated with the position of senior scientific advisor for four years. Since 1977 Dr. Longwell has been E.R. Gilliland Professor of Chemical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests for the last decade have been primarily related to his activities as Associate Director of the M.I.T. Center for Environmental Health Sciences, with special focus on generation and health effects of combustion products. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Chemical Society. Dr. George Apostolakis Dr. Apostolakis was graduated with a degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University, Athens, Greece, and with a masters degree in engineering science and a doctorate in engineering science and applied mathematics from the California Institute of Technology. He is currently a professor in the Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Department, at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has been a consultant to numerous national and state agencies, as well as to public and private businesses in the area of risk assessment and analysis, particularly as applied to all types of energy production and hazardous waste elimination. Dr. Apostolakis also has participated in the activities and deliberations of countless national and international committees, societies, and conferences. He has published extensively in his field of risk assessment and analysis. He has a particular interest in mathematical methods for risk and reliability

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions assessment of complex technological systems; uncertainty analysis; decision analysis; and application of probabilistic models to safety and reliability analyses of nuclear reactors, chemical process systems, space systems, and the control of hazardous substances. Dr. Joseph Frederick Bunnett Dr. Bunnett was graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from Reed College and with a doctorate from the University of Rochester. He has been the recipient of several fellowships, including two Fulbrights and one Guggenheim. Briefly a research chemist for the Western Pine Association, he joined the faculty of Reed College in 1946. This was followed by positions at the University of North Carolina from 1952 to 1958 and Brown University from 1958 to 1966, including Chairman of the Chemistry Department from 1961 to 1964. From 1966 to the present he has been a faculty member of the University of California, Santa Cruz (emeritus since 1991). He was founding editor of the Journal: Accounts of Chemical Research, and served as its editor for 20 years. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. As a member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), he has occupied many diverse senior and executive positions. With a particular research interest in organic reaction mechanisms, as well as in the elimination of chemical weapons, Dr. Bunnett comes to the Alternatives Committee as the Chairman of the IUPAC Task Force on Scientific Aspects of the Destruction of Chemical Warfare Agents. Dr. Peter S. Daley Dr. Daley was graduated with bachelor of science and master of science degrees in chemical engineering from Cornell University and with a doctoral degree in environmental engineering from the University of Florida. He spent 20 years in the United States Air Force in a wide variety of environmental and environmental engineering assignments, culminating a distinguished career with his appointment as Director of Environmental Policy for the Department of Defense. There he directed the department's environmental policy and activities and was its spokesman to Congress and the press regarding environmental matters. He recently was appointed Vice President for Environment and Technology for Waste Management International, London, leaving the position of Senior Director of Research and Development at Waste Management, Inc., where his efforts were concentrated on methods

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions for treating, stabilizing, destroying and handling chemical wastes and on resource recovery and waste reduction. Mr. Gene H. Dyer Mr. Dyer was graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry, mathematics, and physics from the University of Nebraska. Over a 12-year period he worked for General Electric as a process engineer, the U.S. Navy as a Research and Development project engineer, and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission as a project engineer. He then began a more than 20-year career with the Bechtel Corporation in 1963. First a consultant on advanced nuclear power plants and later a program supervisor for nuclear facilities, he then served as manager of the Process and Environmental Department from 1969 to 1983. This department provided engineering services related to research and development projects, including technology probes, environmental assessment, air pollution control, water pollution control, process development, nuclear fuel process development, and regional planning. He culminated his career at Bechtel by serving as a senior staff consultant for several years, with responsibility for identifying and evaluating new technologies and managing their further development and testing for practical applications. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and a registered Professional Engineer. Dr. David S. Kosson Dr. Kosson was graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering, a masters degree in chemical and biochemical engineering, and a doctorate in chemical and biochemical engineering from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He joined the faculty at Rutgers in 1986 and was made an associate professor with tenure in 1990. He teaches graduate and undergraduate chemical engineering courses. In addition, he is the projects manager for the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, where considerable work is under way in developing microbial, chemical, and physical treatment methods for hazardous waste. He is responsible for project planning and coordination, from basic research through full-scale design and implementation. Dr. Kosson is a participant in several Environmental Protection Agency Advisory Panels involved in waste research and is the Director of the Physical Treatment Division of the Hazardous Substances Management Research Center in New Jersey. He is a prolific writer in the fields of chemical engineering and waste management and treatment. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions Dr. Walter Grant May Dr. May was graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering and master of science degree in chemistry from the University of Saskatchewan and with a doctor of science degree in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan as a professor of chemical engineering in 1943. In 1948, he began a distinguished career with Exxon Research and Engineering Company, where he was a Senior Science Advisor from 1976 to 1983. He was Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Illinois from 1983 until his retirement in 1991. There he conducted courses in process design, thermodynamics, chemical reactor design, separation processes, and industrial chemistry and stoichiometry. Dr. May has published extensively, served on the editorial boards of Chemical Engineering Reviews and Chemical Engineering Progress, and obtained numerous patents in his field. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and he has received special awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has a particular interest in separations research work. Dr. Matthew Meselson Dr. Meselson was graduated with a bachelor of philosophy degree from the University of Chicago and a doctorate in physical chemistry from California Institute of Technology. Following a brief term with the faculty at Caltech, he joined the faculty at Harvard University, where since 1976 he has been the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences. Dr. Meselson is the recipient of numerous awards for distinguished accomplishment, including the National Academy of Sciences Prize for Molecular Biology; the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Chicago, Yale, and Princeton; a MacArthur fellowship; and many others. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and member of numerous national and international honorary societies. For almost 30 years Dr. Meselson has had an interest in the arms control of chemical and biological weapons and has served as a consultant on this subject to various government agencies.

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions Dr. Henry Shaw Dr. Shaw was graduated with a bachelors degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York, a masters degree in chemical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and a master of business administration degree and a doctorate in physical chemistry from Rutgers University. From 1957 to 1965 Dr. Shaw worked as a nuclear chemical engineer for Babcock and Wilcox Company and for Mobil Oil Corporation. Then, over a period of 20 years, he rose from research engineer to Manager of the Environmental Research Area of the Exxon Research and Engineering Company. In this latter position, his responsibilities included conducting research on global environmental problems such as acid precipitation and atmospheric build-up of CO2. In 1986 Dr. Shaw was appointed Professor of Chemical Engineering in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Environmental Science at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, Dr. Shaw was the director of a multi-university study involving the New Jersey Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, and Pennsylvania State University that established the Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Emissions Reduction. Dr. Shaw is also supervising research on the thermal destruction of hazardous and toxic wastes using plasmas and catalytic oxidation and the aqueous scrubbing of acid rain precursors. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Thomas O. Tiernan Dr. Tiernan was graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, and with master of science and doctoral degrees in chemistry from Carnegie-Mellon University. He worked for the United States Air Force for 15 years as a research chemist, including 8 years as the director of the Gaseous Excitation and Ionization Processes Group, Aerospace Research Laboratories, where his work primarily involved radiation chemistry, radiation effects, and ion and electron collision processes. In 1975, he joined the faculty of Wright State University as Professor of Chemistry. Concurrently, he was Director of Brehm Laboratory from 1976 to 1987, and has been Director of the Toxic Contaminant Research Program from 1987 to the present. His laboratory was involved in the earliest work to develop techniques for measuring ultra-low levels of chlorinated dioxins. Today it is involved in base-catalyzed decomposition, or dehalogenation, processes that are principally concerned with chlorinated

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions aromatics, such as PCBs, chlorinated dioxins, chlorinated dimethyl furans, as well as a large number of pesticides and solvents. The recipient of numerous grants, and a prodigious writer in his field, Dr. Tiernan has attained many special honors and awards. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemists and a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, and the American Society for Testing Materials. Dr. Barry Martin Trost Dr. Trost was graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania, and with a doctorate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin, rising in a very short time to full Professor of Chemistry, and later to chairman of the department. In 1987, he was appointed Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University and became the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor of Humanities and Sciences in 1990. He has received appointments as Visiting Professor and Lecturer at numerous universities throughout the United States, Canada, and Western Europe. He has very actively participated on the editorial and editorial advisory boards of many books and journals. His many awards and honors include early election to the National Academy of Sciences, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemistry Society Awards in Pure Chemistry and for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, and recently the Dr. Paul Janssen Prize for Creativity in Organic Synthesis. Dr. Trost has been a consultant to industry, a prodigious author, and a member of numerous committees, panels, juries, and delegations serving the academic and scientific communities involved in chemistry. His special interests are organic reactions and processes. Dr. James Robert Wild Dr. Wild was graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from the University of California, Davis, and with a doctorate in cell biology from the University of 238 California/Riverside. Following service as a research microbiologist-biochemist at the U.S. Navy Medical Research Institute, he joined the faculty at Texas A&M University in 1975 as an Assistant Professor of Genetics. He was an Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Genetics from 1980 to 1984 and was appointed a Professor of Biochemistry and Genetics in 1984. In addition to being an extremely active teacher, he has served the university in increasingly responsible positions, including as Chairman of the Intercollegiate Faculty of Genetics from 1984 to 1987, Professor and Interim Head of the

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Alternative Technologies for the Destruction of Chemical Agents and Munitions Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics from 1986 to 1990, and Executive Associate Dean/Associate Dean for Academic Programs of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences from 1988 to the present. Dr. Wild has conducted and directed extensive genetic and biochemical research and has published many articles and participated in countless seminars and invited presentations. He holds a particular interest in the design of biological systems that might positively contribute to the enormous problem of environmental cleanup.