chain equipment, training materials, technical advisers, and operations research support, as well as conferences and sponsorships. The Save the Children Fund has recently extended its goal to the establishment of sustainable delivery systems for a broad range of basic health services, which includes vaccines (Poore, 1992). Medicines sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders, France) and the Task Force on Hepatitis B Immunization (based in the United States) are other examples of nongovernmental organizations that continue to influence immunization programs worldwide.

REFERENCES

American Home Products. 1991. Annual Report. Madison, New Jersey.


Baudrihaye N. 1992. European vaccine manufacturers: Present status and future trends. Vaccine 10:893–895.

Budget of the U.S. Government. 1987. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Budget of the U.S. Government. 1988. Washington, D.C: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Budget of the U.S. Government. 1989. Washington, D.C: U.S. Government Printing Office.


Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Office of Management. 1993. Data regarding CBER FTEs and budget. Provided in response to Institute of Medicine request. Rockville, Maryland.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Immunization. 1992. Data regarding CDC budget. Provided in response to Institute of Medicine request. Atlanta.

Children's Defense Fund. Undated. General information. Washington, D.C.

Cohen J. 1993. Childhood vaccines: The R&D factor. Science 239:1528–1529.


Freeman P. 1991. Memo to Friends of the National Vaccine Program. The Vaccine Project. March 15. Law Center, University of Massachusetts at Boston.


Homma A. 1992. Technology transfer. Paper presented to the CVI Task Force on Priority Setting and Strategic Plans. Geneva: Children's Vaccine Initiative, Geneva.

Homma A Knouss RF. 1992. Transfer of vaccine technology to developing countries: The Latin American experience. Paper presented at the NIAID Conference on Vaccines and Public Health: Assessing Technologies and Global Policies for the Children's Vaccine initiative. November 5–6, 1992, Bethesda, Maryland.

Hoover G, Campbell A, Spain PJ, eds. 1991. Hoover's Handbook of American Business 1992. Emeryville, California: The Reference Press.


Institute of Medicine. 1985. Vaccine Supply and Innovation. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. 1986a. New Vaccine Development, Establishing Priorities. Volume 1. Diseases of Importance in the United States. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. 1986b. New Vaccine Development, Establishing Priorities. Volume II. Diseases of Importance in the Developing World. Washington. D.C.: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. 1991. Malaria: Obstacles and Opportunities. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.


Kessler DA. 1992. Testimony before Senate Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Committee on Appropriations. Childhood Vaccine Research and Development Issues. April. Washington, D.C: U.S. Congress, Senate.


March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 1991. Annual Report. Washington, D.C.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement